Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRoe Tah Woo
IN THE NEWS

Roe Tah Woo

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 11, 1990 | From Associated Press
Radical students and dissidents fought South Korean riot police in street battles in Seoul and other cities Thursday for the second day, despite a government warning against violence. Riot police moved swiftly to disperse the groups of 200 to 500 students who chanted "Down with President Roh Tae Woo!" during scattered protests in the capital. Thousands of riot police were deployed in downtown areas.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 11, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move considered certain to exacerbate already intensifying political unrest, President Roh Tae Woo's ruling party Friday rammed through the National Assembly two bills it described as reforms of authoritarian laws left over from his predecessor's regime. With opposition politicians occupying the rostrum, Speaker Park Joon Kyu stood at the entrance of the assembly hall, announced the introduction of the bills and declared them passed--all within one minute.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 11, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move considered certain to exacerbate already intensifying political unrest, President Roh Tae Woo's ruling party Friday rammed through the National Assembly two bills it described as reforms of authoritarian laws left over from his predecessor's regime. With opposition politicians occupying the rostrum, Speaker Park Joon Kyu stood at the entrance of the assembly hall, announced the introduction of the bills and declared them passed--all within one minute.
NEWS
May 11, 1990 | From Associated Press
Radical students and dissidents fought South Korean riot police in street battles in Seoul and other cities Thursday for the second day, despite a government warning against violence. Riot police moved swiftly to disperse the groups of 200 to 500 students who chanted "Down with President Roh Tae Woo!" during scattered protests in the capital. Thousands of riot police were deployed in downtown areas.
NEWS
January 25, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korea's political savants, by forming what they hope will become their nation's perennial ruling party, have looked toward Japan for a vision of what the future might bring. President Roh Tae Woo and two of South Korea's three opposition leaders shocked their countrymen--and the political rank and file--by announcing this week that they had secretly negotiated to merge their parties into a gigantic conservative alliance.
NEWS
January 25, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korea's political savants, by forming what they hope will become their nation's perennial ruling party, have looked toward Japan for a vision of what the future might bring. President Roh Tae Woo and two of South Korea's three opposition leaders shocked their countrymen--and the political rank and file--by announcing this week that they had secretly negotiated to merge their parties into a gigantic conservative alliance.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|