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Roelf Meyer

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NEWS
June 14, 1997 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 49, Roelf Meyer has already made his mark on history. The boyish-faced lawyer was the former apartheid regime's chief negotiator in the tortuous transition from white rule to multi-party democracy in 1994 and was co-architect of the new constitution. As secretary-general of the National Party, which ruled South Africa for 46 years, he was the potential successor to Frederik W. de Klerk, the party leader and former president.
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NEWS
June 14, 1997 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 49, Roelf Meyer has already made his mark on history. The boyish-faced lawyer was the former apartheid regime's chief negotiator in the tortuous transition from white rule to multi-party democracy in 1994 and was co-architect of the new constitution. As secretary-general of the National Party, which ruled South Africa for 46 years, he was the potential successor to Frederik W. de Klerk, the party leader and former president.
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NEWS
June 18, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Leading South African political parties patched up the latest crisis in their democracy talks but acknowledged that a final showdown had only been postponed. The government's chief negotiator, Roelf Meyer, defused at least temporarily the anger of six conservative black and white groups, the Concerned South Africans Group, by placing on the agenda their demand that South Africa become a federation of autonomous regions.
NEWS
November 28, 1992 | Associated Press
The government and the ANC will meet next week to discuss a date for elections to end white-minority rule, a joint statement said Friday. The meeting is seen as a first step toward settling disagreements over when to hold the vote and resume talks on giving political power to the black majority. The African National Congress has rejected a government proposal to have elections in early 1994.
NEWS
June 4, 1993 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Black and white negotiators tentatively agreed Thursday night to set April 27, 1994, as the date for the first multiracial democratic elections in South Africa's 350-year history. The parties postponed final approval of the date until multi-party talks resume later this month, but the agreement marks an important victory for President Frederik W. de Klerk's government and the African National Congress, the two powerful opponents that have emerged as unlikely allies in the election-date debate.
NEWS
April 2, 1993 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly a year after their talks collapsed in acrimony, black and white leaders Thursday restarted negotiations on the future of South Africa but found themselves trading accusations on political violence and unable even to agree on a name for their new forum. South Africans hope this new round of constitutional talks will lead to multiracial democratic elections by early next year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1994
South Africa's first black president, Nelson Mandela, will be inaugurated today. Vice President Al Gore and First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton will be among the dignitaries and heads of state who will bring good wishes and plenty of foreign assistance to Pretoria. At least 1 billion viewers will witness this historic moment on television. It has been an astonishing two weeks for the 75-year-old Mandela and his African National Congress.
NEWS
October 24, 1999 | From Reuters
U.S. negotiator George J. Mitchell announced Saturday that the Northern Ireland peace talks had been adjourned until Wednesday. "The parties have agreed to continue the review with meetings among themselves on Monday and Tuesday, and I will return to meet with them on Wednesday," he said in a statement. Mitchell warned against false optimism and said significant differences remained between pro-British Ulster Unionists and Irish republicans.
NEWS
May 29, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
The government patched up a dispute with a radical black group Friday, but wider negotiations on ending white rule made limited progress. Two Cabinet ministers and senior officials of the Pan-Africanist Congress (PAC) hammered out an agreement behind closed doors to soothe the black group's anger over a police raid this week in which 75 PAC members were detained.
NEWS
September 13, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The killing of 28 African National Congress supporters by black homeland soldiers last week appeared Saturday to have done what four months of demanding and mudslinging from all sides had failed to do--nudge ANC leader Nelson Mandela and President Frederik W. de Klerk back to the discussion table.
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