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Rogaine Drug

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NEWS
March 13, 1990 | LINDA ROACH MONROE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Howard Hintz looks in the mirror every morning, he sees a guy with a full head of hair. Maybe it's not quite as thick on top as it was when he was 18, but neither is it as thin as it was a few years ago--and Hintz has a morning and evening ritual to keep it that way. "I'll continue to use it until something else comes along. Or until I get to a point where I'm too old to be bothered," said the 31-year-old Los Angeles chef.
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NEWS
September 28, 1999 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The current New England Journal of Medicine--one of the world's top outlets of clinical information--carries a favorable article on two popular hair-loss treatments without disclosing the author's financial ties to the companies that make the drugs. Publication of the article, by Dr. Vera Price, a UC San Francisco professor of clinical dermatology, raises questions about the journal's monitoring of potential conflicts of interest.
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BUSINESS
August 19, 1988 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, Times Staff Writer
It may be the marketing dream of this century--if not this millennium. An honest-to-pate anti-baldness treatment that even Uncle Sam says can sometimes work. Something to advertise from dome to shining dome? Not quite. Just two days after the federal government approved an anti-baldness treatment, its maker, Upjohn Co., says it initially plans a rather low-key marketing approach for the prescription drug Rogaine.
BUSINESS
September 27, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Drug Maker Seeks OK to Sell Stronger Rogaine: Pharmacia & Upjohn Inc. has asked the Food and Drug Administration to approve increasing the concentration of topical minoxidil, Rogaine's main ingredient, from 2% to 5% and to allow the 5% solution to be sold over the counter immediately, sources familiar with the situation said. Pharmacia declined to comment on the specifics of the application.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1990 | LINDA DARNELL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Upjohn Co. is reaching out to Latino men worried about losing their hair in an effort to get them to try its prescription drug for the treatment of male-pattern baldness. Some analysts said the advertising campaign, which debuts in Spanish-language newspapers on July 25, is a sign of Upjohn's new aggressiveness in marketing Rogaine Topical Solution (2% minoxidil), a product that is selling well by prescription drug standards but has yet to fully realize its market potential. The Kalamazoo, Mich.
BUSINESS
May 29, 1989 | From Associated Press
When Rogaine was unveiled last September by Upjohn Co. as the first scientifically proven hair-loss remedy, financial analysts envisioned desperate balding men running to doctors for prescriptions. Today, those analysts--and many consumers--are disappointed, and Upjohn is preparing a new, more aggressive marketing campaign aimed at men whose embarrassment over seeking help for their hair loss may have prevented them from trying the drug. Upjohn says it is pleased with Rogaine's performance and blames drug industry analysts--some of whom predicted 1989 U.S. sales would top $300 million--for unrealistic expectations.
BUSINESS
September 27, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Drug Maker Seeks OK to Sell Stronger Rogaine: Pharmacia & Upjohn Inc. has asked the Food and Drug Administration to approve increasing the concentration of topical minoxidil, Rogaine's main ingredient, from 2% to 5% and to allow the 5% solution to be sold over the counter immediately, sources familiar with the situation said. Pharmacia declined to comment on the specifics of the application.
NEWS
August 18, 1988 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer
The federal government gave approval for the first time Wednesday to an anti-baldness treatment that produced some hair growth in four out of 10 men tested and should be available in drugstores within six weeks. The prescription drug, known as Rogaine, is the first to gain the endorsement of the Food and Drug Administration for use by the approximately 30 million people in the United States who suffer hair loss.
BUSINESS
August 28, 1991 | From Associated Press
A prescription hair restorer for men will soon be advertised in women's magazines now that the government has approved its use for both sexes, officials said Tuesday. Rogaine, a 2% solution of the drug minoxidil, was introduced by Upjohn Co. of Kalamazoo, Mich., with great fanfare in 1988. But its use was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for men only, while the company continued testing it on women. Drug industry analysts have been disappointed by Rogaine's U.S. sales.
BUSINESS
April 19, 1996 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pharmacia & Upjohn is launching TV spots for its over-the-counter baldness treatment this weekend amid a high-stakes effort to fend off competitors to Rogaine. The spots, aimed at men and women, aren't hair-raising in themselves. In one commercial, a balding man uses Rogaine at the urging of his wife and sees modest results four months later. "See, there's room for growth in every relationship," says his wife.
BUSINESS
April 9, 1996 | From Associated Press
Trying to get rid of that bald spot may get cheaper yet. The Food and Drug Administration has given permission to two companies to sell generic nonprescription versions of Rogaine, the hair-regrowth solution. The decision by the FDA, announced Monday, comes two months after it gave Rogaine's maker, Pharmacia & Upjohn Inc., permission to sell topical minoxidil without a prescription.
NEWS
November 18, 1995 | From Associated Press
Balding Americans should be able to buy the hair-growth drug Rogaine without a prescription, a panel of scientists told the Food and Drug Administration on Friday. The FDA advisers voted, 12 to 4, that if Rogaine is well labeled, Americans should be able to follow the instructions to determine if they have the kind of hereditary baldness that the drug can treat.
BUSINESS
July 28, 1994 | From Associated Press
A drug to fight baldness should not be sold without a prescription, a scientific advisory panel told government regulators Wednesday. The Upjohn Co. is seeking permission from the Food and Drug Administration to sell Rogaine, the hair growth medicine, over the counter. But an FDA advisory committee recommended against the move, saying that so few people benefit from Rogaine that wider availability would merely encourage the general public to waste its money.
NEWS
November 15, 1991 | ROSE-MARIE TURK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For two years, California businesswoman Rita Lazar panicked every time she looked at her hair. It was thinning and she couldn't stop the process. But Lazar is lucky. Diagnosed with androgenetic alopecia, or genetic hair loss, she was able to stop the fallout and regrow hair with minoxidil, the only FDA-approved treatment for her condition. Patented by Upjohn and marketed as Rogaine, the topical preparation was introduced for men only in 1988.
BUSINESS
August 28, 1991 | From Associated Press
A prescription hair restorer for men will soon be advertised in women's magazines now that the government has approved its use for both sexes, officials said Tuesday. Rogaine, a 2% solution of the drug minoxidil, was introduced by Upjohn Co. of Kalamazoo, Mich., with great fanfare in 1988. But its use was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for men only, while the company continued testing it on women. Drug industry analysts have been disappointed by Rogaine's U.S. sales.
NEWS
November 18, 1995 | From Associated Press
Balding Americans should be able to buy the hair-growth drug Rogaine without a prescription, a panel of scientists told the Food and Drug Administration on Friday. The FDA advisers voted, 12 to 4, that if Rogaine is well labeled, Americans should be able to follow the instructions to determine if they have the kind of hereditary baldness that the drug can treat.
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