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Roger Altman

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OPINION
February 21, 1993 | David Lauter and James Risen
It may seem odd, given the populist tone of Bill Clinton's campaign, but two of the most powerful economic policy-makers of his Administration hail directly from Wall Street, from two of the bluest chips on the block. The two are old friends--Robert E. Rubin, 54, the former head of the Goldman Sachs investment house and Roger Altman, 46, a successful Wall Street consultant affiliated with the Blackstone Group.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1999
Re "The Big Risk of Tinkering With Success," Opinion, Aug. 15: Roger Altman is right. Right now, when the economy is about as good as it gets, paying down our multitrillion-dollar national debt is far more important than cutting taxes. Every dollar of debt we pay off today means lower interest payments forever. Conservatives should love the idea of using any future surpluses to pay down the national debt: It's a simple way to cut government spending permanently. GARETT JONES La Jolla
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1999
Re "The Big Risk of Tinkering With Success," Opinion, Aug. 15: Roger Altman is right. Right now, when the economy is about as good as it gets, paying down our multitrillion-dollar national debt is far more important than cutting taxes. Every dollar of debt we pay off today means lower interest payments forever. Conservatives should love the idea of using any future surpluses to pay down the national debt: It's a simple way to cut government spending permanently. GARETT JONES La Jolla
BUSINESS
September 4, 1994 | JAMES RISEN
Last weekend, Roger Altman was back at his ranch in Wyoming's Jackson Hole, looking tanned and relaxed, entertaining friends like White House chief economist Laura D'Andrea Tyson and her family and planning a backcountry camping trip where the only white water he's likely to encounter will be on the Snake River. Altman, the deputy Treasury secretary who was forced to resign Aug.
BUSINESS
March 16, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Services
President Clinton on Monday named Deputy Treasury Secretary Roger Altman to head up the Resolution Trust Corp. while the Administration looks for a permanent chief executive at the thrift cleanup agency. Altman's responsibilities at the RTC will be in addition to his Treasury duties. The appointment of an interim chief executive follows the departure of Albert V. Casey as the head of the RTC. The Clinton Administration accepted Casey's resignation Monday.
BUSINESS
September 4, 1994 | JAMES RISEN
Last weekend, Roger Altman was back at his ranch in Wyoming's Jackson Hole, looking tanned and relaxed, entertaining friends like White House chief economist Laura D'Andrea Tyson and her family and planning a backcountry camping trip where the only white water he's likely to encounter will be on the Snake River. Altman, the deputy Treasury secretary who was forced to resign Aug.
NEWS
August 8, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jean Hanson, the Treasury Department lawyer who contradicted a senior Clinton Administration official before a bank of television cameras, appears likely to become the first casualty of congressional hearings into the Whitewater affair. Before it's over, she may have plenty of company. Hanson, the department's general counsel, is expected to be pressured to resign by Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen in the near future, according to department officials who spoke on condition of anonymity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1994
If Roger Altman, deputy Treasury secretary--and the star witness at the marathon Senate hearing on Whitewater that went on until the wee hours Wednesday morning--did shave the truth in his previous testimony, he is not the first government official appearing before Congress to have done so. Nor did many of his inquisitors have very high ground to stand on.
NEWS
December 11, 1992 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President-elect Bill Clinton, in a gesture of solidarity with Congress and reassurance for Wall Street, Thursday announced his choice of Sen. Lloyd Bentsen of Texas and Rep. Leon E. Panetta of California to head the team that will guide economic policy in the new Administration.
NEWS
August 5, 1994 | MICHAEL ROSS and SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Under intense questioning from Republican senators, a senior White House official gave contradictory testimony Thursday about a meeting at which Deputy Treasury Secretary Roger Altman briefed aides to President Clinton on a Whitewater-related investigation by the Resolution Trust Corp. In prepared remarks read to the Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee, White House Deputy Chief of Staff Harold M.
NEWS
August 18, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deputy Treasury Secretary Roger Altman, facing intense criticism from Congress for his role in the Whitewater affair, resigned Wednesday, becoming the Clinton Administration's highest-ranking victim of the controversy. President Clinton accepted Altman's resignation after Democratic leaders on Capitol Hill made it clear to the White House and to Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen that they believed Altman's credibility with Congress had been irreparably damaged.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1994
After an exciting week of Senate Whitewater hearings, I have a few observations: It's pretty obvious that Deputy Treasury Secretary Roger Altman did lie to the Senate, if not affirmatively, then by omission. I guess we should be thankful that even the partisan Democrats in the Senate did not gloss over Altman's lies. However, what is difficult for me to understand is the hypocrisy of the Republican senators. A Democrat who lies to the Senate is not worthy of the office and should resign immediately.
NEWS
August 8, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jean Hanson, the Treasury Department lawyer who contradicted a senior Clinton Administration official before a bank of television cameras, appears likely to become the first casualty of congressional hearings into the Whitewater affair. Before it's over, she may have plenty of company. Hanson, the department's general counsel, is expected to be pressured to resign by Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen in the near future, according to department officials who spoke on condition of anonymity.
NEWS
August 7, 1994 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Republicans first learned that President Clinton's aides had been tipped off about the government investigation of his old friend and investment partner, James B. McDougal, they began using words not often heard here since the days of Watergate--words like cover-up and obstruction of justice. But nearly two weeks of intense congressional hearings have failed to produce any substantial evidence that the Clinton Administration actually interfered with the Resolution Trust Corp.'
NEWS
August 5, 1994 | MICHAEL ROSS and SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Under intense questioning from Republican senators, a senior White House official gave contradictory testimony Thursday about a meeting at which Deputy Treasury Secretary Roger Altman briefed aides to President Clinton on a Whitewater-related investigation by the Resolution Trust Corp. In prepared remarks read to the Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee, White House Deputy Chief of Staff Harold M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1994
If Roger Altman, deputy Treasury secretary--and the star witness at the marathon Senate hearing on Whitewater that went on until the wee hours Wednesday morning--did shave the truth in his previous testimony, he is not the first government official appearing before Congress to have done so. Nor did many of his inquisitors have very high ground to stand on.
NEWS
March 22, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deputy Treasury Secretary Roger Altman was told in advance by a top federal regulator that the investigation into the failed Madison Guaranty Savings & Loan would be referred to the Justice Department for possible prosecution. There is no indication that Altman tipped off the White House about the looming criminal referral. The session predates Treasury general counsel Jean E. Hanson's controversial Sept.
NEWS
December 11, 1992 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
As he announced the first members of his economic team Thursday, President-elect Bill Clinton made clear that the loudest voice in the new Administration's economic policy will be his own. With unusual force, Clinton stressed that, while he will look to his new team for advice, "in the end, I will make the ultimate decisions and be the ultimate arbiter."
BUSINESS
April 24, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was chilled and overcast as the borrowed corporate jet, inbound from Washington, sliced through the cloud cover into the Little Rock, Ark., airport early on the morning of Jan. 7, 1993. Robert Rubin, a wealthy Wall Street financier and one of President-elect Bill Clinton's closest confidants, had arranged for the plane so they could all fly down together: Rubin, Lloyd Bentsen, Leon Panetta, Ira Magaziner, Roger Altman, Alice Rivlin and perhaps half a dozen others.
NEWS
March 22, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Deputy Treasury Secretary Roger Altman was told in advance by a top federal regulator that the investigation into the failed Madison Guaranty Savings & Loan would be referred to the Justice Department for possible prosecution. There is no indication that Altman tipped off the White House about the looming criminal referral. The session predates Treasury general counsel Jean E. Hanson's controversial Sept.
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