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Roger Angell

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NEWS
April 7, 1991 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last fall, when the Oakland A's flattened the Boston Red Sox in the American League playoffs, most baseball writers rounded up the usual suspects--balls, bats and outs--to describe Beantown's stunning collapse. Writing on tight deadlines and with limited space, they had little choice. But one scribe, seeking his muse in the old Roadrunner cartoons and with considerably more time on his hands, saw things a bit differently: "The Sox in late innings reminded you of Wile E.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
This week's New Yorker features an essay by Roger Angell that is as unexpected as it is understated - a meditation on the death of his wife Carol earlier this year. Or not on the death but on its aftermath, framed in terms of all the things she's missed. “My wife, Carol,” Angell begins, “doesn't know that President Obama won re-election last Tuesday, carrying Ohio and Pennsylvania and Colorado, and compiling more than three hundred electoral votes. She doesn't know anything about Hurricane Sandy.
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BOOKS
April 3, 1988 | Gary Dretzka, Dretzka is deputy sports editor of the Chicago Tribune. . . and a Brewers fan
Face it, unless you're a die-hard fan, the mere thought of going to a baseball game these days is enough to inspire dread. Getting good seats is next to impossible, waiting in long lines for expensive food isn't much fun, and the traffic jams are too painful to contemplate.
BOOKS
May 21, 2006 | Richard Eder, Richard Eder, former book critic of The Times, was awarded a Pulitzer Prize for criticism in 1987.
THERE was a time, mostly past, when the New Yorker short story was admired or criticized as its own genre: civilized, subtle, its point hidden like a stiletto in a linen napkin, and no cussing. Less noted but at least as distinctive was a school of stoic, antically grave and fine-etched expository writing. E.B. White was the star, but William Maxwell, Joseph Mitchell and Roger Angell were among his schoolmates and disciples.
SPORTS
July 18, 2001 | Justin Heckert
A consumer's guide to the best and worst of sports media and merchandise. Ground rules: If it can be read, played, heard, observed, worn, viewed, dialed or downloaded, it's in play here. What: "A Pitcher's Story: Innings with David Cone" Author: Roger Angell (Warner Books). Price: $24.95. When legendary baseball writer Roger Angell from the New Yorker begins the task of writing a book profiling Yankee right-hander David Cone, he hasn't the slightest idea of what's about to happen. Could anyone?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
This week's New Yorker features an essay by Roger Angell that is as unexpected as it is understated - a meditation on the death of his wife Carol earlier this year. Or not on the death but on its aftermath, framed in terms of all the things she's missed. “My wife, Carol,” Angell begins, “doesn't know that President Obama won re-election last Tuesday, carrying Ohio and Pennsylvania and Colorado, and compiling more than three hundred electoral votes. She doesn't know anything about Hurricane Sandy.
SPORTS
July 3, 1985 | ROSS NEWHAN
Former Montreal right-hander Steve Rogers, who had made five starts for the Angels' Edmonton farm team, rejected an offer to continue pitching there and was given his release Tuesday. Angel Manager Gene Mauch said Rogers had pitched well in only one of the five starts, allowing 15 earned runs and 42 hits in his 35 innings. "The consensus of opinion was that at this time he couldn't outpitch anyone we have here," Mauch said, alluding to the Angels' rotation.
BOOKS
May 21, 2006 | Richard Eder, Richard Eder, former book critic of The Times, was awarded a Pulitzer Prize for criticism in 1987.
THERE was a time, mostly past, when the New Yorker short story was admired or criticized as its own genre: civilized, subtle, its point hidden like a stiletto in a linen napkin, and no cussing. Less noted but at least as distinctive was a school of stoic, antically grave and fine-etched expository writing. E.B. White was the star, but William Maxwell, Joseph Mitchell and Roger Angell were among his schoolmates and disciples.
SPORTS
June 4, 1985 | ROSS NEWHAN, Times Staff Writer
Steve Rogers, a winner of 158 games in 12 seasons with Montreal, is returning to the minor leagues for the first time since 1973. The 35-year-old right-hander agreed to a contract with the Angels' Edmonton farm club Monday. He and the Angels are hopeful it is a temporary assignment, a steppingstone back to a starting job with the Angels, for whom he auditioned seven days ago in New York. The Expos had released Rogers two weeks earlier. He was 2-4 with a 5.
NEWS
December 31, 1987
Re "Christmas Rites Require Rousing Ritual of Rhyme," Dec. 23: In Marylou Oates's Christmas list One seasonal thought is carefully missed, A "thank you" from your gossip hawker To Roger Angell of "The Noo Yawker". DIGBY WOLF Los Angeles
SPORTS
July 18, 2001 | Justin Heckert
A consumer's guide to the best and worst of sports media and merchandise. Ground rules: If it can be read, played, heard, observed, worn, viewed, dialed or downloaded, it's in play here. What: "A Pitcher's Story: Innings with David Cone" Author: Roger Angell (Warner Books). Price: $24.95. When legendary baseball writer Roger Angell from the New Yorker begins the task of writing a book profiling Yankee right-hander David Cone, he hasn't the slightest idea of what's about to happen. Could anyone?
NEWS
April 7, 1991 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last fall, when the Oakland A's flattened the Boston Red Sox in the American League playoffs, most baseball writers rounded up the usual suspects--balls, bats and outs--to describe Beantown's stunning collapse. Writing on tight deadlines and with limited space, they had little choice. But one scribe, seeking his muse in the old Roadrunner cartoons and with considerably more time on his hands, saw things a bit differently: "The Sox in late innings reminded you of Wile E.
BOOKS
April 3, 1988 | Gary Dretzka, Dretzka is deputy sports editor of the Chicago Tribune. . . and a Brewers fan
Face it, unless you're a die-hard fan, the mere thought of going to a baseball game these days is enough to inspire dread. Getting good seats is next to impossible, waiting in long lines for expensive food isn't much fun, and the traffic jams are too painful to contemplate.
SPORTS
July 3, 1985 | ROSS NEWHAN
Former Montreal right-hander Steve Rogers, who had made five starts for the Angels' Edmonton farm team, rejected an offer to continue pitching there and was given his release Tuesday. Angel Manager Gene Mauch said Rogers had pitched well in only one of the five starts, allowing 15 earned runs and 42 hits in his 35 innings. "The consensus of opinion was that at this time he couldn't outpitch anyone we have here," Mauch said, alluding to the Angels' rotation.
SPORTS
June 4, 1985 | ROSS NEWHAN, Times Staff Writer
Steve Rogers, a winner of 158 games in 12 seasons with Montreal, is returning to the minor leagues for the first time since 1973. The 35-year-old right-hander agreed to a contract with the Angels' Edmonton farm club Monday. He and the Angels are hopeful it is a temporary assignment, a steppingstone back to a starting job with the Angels, for whom he auditioned seven days ago in New York. The Expos had released Rogers two weeks earlier. He was 2-4 with a 5.
MAGAZINE
August 12, 1990
WHEN PETER H. GORDON of the New York State Museum began putting together an exhibition of baseball-themed art, he discovered it was a massive task. With its thrilling heroics and mesmerizing rhythms, the national pastime has captured the imaginations of American artists and writers in a way that, say, badminton or even soccer never could. What is it about baseball that makes us cherish it so?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Gardner Botsford, 87, a longtime editor at the New Yorker magazine who was considered instrumental in shaping its style, died Monday of bone marrow disease at his home in New York City. Over a 40-year career that spanned the magazine's most influential years, Botsford edited work from writers such as A.J. Liebling, Roger Angell and, later, his wife, author Janet Malcolm. Under the editorship of William Shawn, Botsford was considered one of the magazine's most powerful voices.
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