Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRoger B Porter
IN THE NEWS

Roger B Porter

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 12, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
President-elect Bush, filling the final slot in his Cabinet, plans today to name as his secretary of energy retired Adm. James D. Watkins, former chief of naval operations and chairman of the highly regarded presidential commission on AIDS, sources close to Bush said Wednesday. Watkins, 61, fits one of the prime criteria that Bush has laid out for the energy post--knowledge of the nation's nuclear industry and the problems of the country's troubled nuclear weapons plants.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 12, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
President-elect Bush, filling the final slot in his Cabinet, plans today to name as his secretary of energy retired Adm. James D. Watkins, former chief of naval operations and chairman of the highly regarded presidential commission on AIDS, sources close to Bush said Wednesday. Watkins, 61, fits one of the prime criteria that Bush has laid out for the energy post--knowledge of the nation's nuclear industry and the problems of the country's troubled nuclear weapons plants.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 10, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White House, facing strong congressional opposition to rules that forbid abortion counseling at federally supported family planning clinics, appeared to open the door Tuesday to a compromise on the issue. Although President Bush still favors the controversial rules and is expected to veto House-approved legislation to block their enforcement, Press Secretary Marlin Fitzwater said that the Administration is reviewing its options in working with Congress.
NEWS
April 15, 1992 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking again to cast himself as an agent of change, President Bush used a trip to Michigan on Wednesday to unveil a government reform proposal for the second time in three months. A White House fact sheet touted the event as Bush's announcement that he would "transmit to Congress upon its return" the plan for consolidating federal job-training programs.
NEWS
February 25, 1990 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
A National Governors' Assn. task force adopted a six-point program Saturday for upgrading American education by the start of the next century. But the group skirted what many educators and politicians consider the thorniest scholastic problem of all--funding. The major points of the plan are expected to receive the approval of all of the governors attending the association's mid-winter conference, along with at least a qualified endorsement from President Bush.
NEWS
July 30, 1990 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
After a day of behind the scenes haggling over partisan differences, leaders of the National Governors' Assn. on Sunday adopted a compromise plan for a commission that will grade the states--and the federal government--on progress toward education reform goals.
NEWS
August 5, 1991 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush's chief domestic adviser, laying the groundwork for the 1992 campaign, said Sunday that the Administration has designed a comprehensive domestic program in education, health care, economic growth and crime-fighting, "and we're waiting for Congress to take action." Seeking to rebut arguments that the continent-hopping President has neglected domestic problems, Roger B.
NEWS
May 11, 1989 | RONALD J. OSTROW and DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writers
In his first major domestic policy initiative, President Bush is considering declaring a national crime emergency and plans to propose a combination of prison construction, a crackdown on criminal gun-users and wider use of the death penalty to cope with lawlessness, government sources said Wednesday. But Bush has not yet resolved a deep split within his Administration on the sensitive issue of how--or even whether--to regulate assault weapons as part of the effort, the sources said.
NEWS
January 17, 1996 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For true believers in the Republican revolution, a hefty tax cut was a magic bullet: a way to overcome past mistakes, cut down the federal bureaucracy and ease the pain of deficit reduction--all in one electrifying shot. It has not turned out that way. Americans, according to recent public opinion surveys, are deeply divided over the merits of reducing taxes.
OPINION
March 11, 1990 | Gregg Easterbrook, Gregg Easterbrook is a contributing editor to Newsweek
The Washington pundit class loves tales of personality conflicts at senior levels. Speculating about who's knifing whom is more fun than addressing that annoyance, the issues. In this spirit, the recent, heavily hyped "clash" between White House Chief of Staff John H. Sununu and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator William K. Reilly has been, to columnists and the shout-show circuit, just what the doctor ordered.
NEWS
May 15, 1990 | TOM REDBURN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Call it "Nightmare on Pennsylvania Ave." The driving force behind the budget negotiations that start today between the Bush Administration and congressional leaders is the fear of political bloodletting this fall if automatic spending cuts are not prevented from going into effect.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|