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May 6, 1994 | BUD GREENSPAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On May 6, 1954, Roger Bannister, completing his final year in medical school, arrived early at St. Mary's Hospital in London, honed the spikes on his track shoes, then took the train to Oxford, less than an hour away. There, he and fellow Olympians Chris Brasher and Chris Chataway were to represent the British Amateur Athletic Assn. in a mile race that evening at 6.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2014
Christopher Chataway British track star helped break 4-minute mile Christopher Chataway, 82, a British track star and world record-holder who helped Roger Bannister break the four-minute mile, died of cancer Sunday in London, his son Mark said. Chataway, who later became a newscaster and then a British cabinet minister, was one of two runners who trained for months with Bannister, a 25-year-old British medical student, as he prepared to make his bid to run the fastest mile then ever recorded.
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SPORTS
May 8, 1994 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forty years ago today, a USC graduate named Parry O'Brien broke an athletic barrier and went on to set a standard few in sports have since surpassed. On May 8, 1954, on the floor of the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, O'Brien put the shot where every other post-World War II shotputter had been trying to put it--beyond the 60-foot mark. Thus, two track and field barriers had fallen within 48 hours.
SPORTS
July 27, 2012 | By Lisa Dillman
LONDON -- Organizers of the London Olympics did exactly what they intended. They surprised the world. Roger Bannister, the first man to break the four-minute barrier in a mile race, did not take the final torch leg to light the Olympic flame as many had expected. Instead it was a ceremony of inclusion. Seven young athletes, the hope of the sports future in Britain, were joined by past icons in the torch ceremony Friday night in the opening ceremony. The youngsters moved to the center of the field of play and each lighted a stem that ignited more than 200 petals.
SPORTS
July 27, 2012 | By Lisa Dillman
LONDON -- Organizers of the London Olympics did exactly what they intended. They surprised the world. Roger Bannister, the first man to break the four-minute barrier in a mile race, did not take the final torch leg to light the Olympic flame as many had expected. Instead it was a ceremony of inclusion. Seven young athletes, the hope of the sports future in Britain, were joined by past icons in the torch ceremony Friday night in the opening ceremony. The youngsters moved to the center of the field of play and each lighted a stem that ignited more than 200 petals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2014
Christopher Chataway British track star helped break 4-minute mile Christopher Chataway, 82, a British track star and world record-holder who helped Roger Bannister break the four-minute mile, died of cancer Sunday in London, his son Mark said. Chataway, who later became a newscaster and then a British cabinet minister, was one of two runners who trained for months with Bannister, a 25-year-old British medical student, as he prepared to make his bid to run the fastest mile then ever recorded.
SPORTS
May 2, 2004 | From Associated Press
Fifty years ago, a young English medical student ran four laps around a cinder track at Oxford University on a dank, blustery May evening in front of about 1,000 spectators. With a late burst of speed, Roger Bannister shattered one of sport's most fabled physical and psychological barriers -- running a mile in under four minutes. Half a century later, that magic time -- 3:59.
SPORTS
May 6, 2004 | Elliott Teaford, Times Staff Writer
Four laps, four minutes, one mile. So simple, so tidy, yet so unattainable until a rainy evening 50 years ago today, when Roger Bannister, a 25-year-old medical student, became the first person to break the athletic equivalent of the sound barrier. "The four-minute mile had a beauty about it, a symmetry," Norris McWhirter, a track and field statistician and founder of the "Guinness Book of World Records" once said.
SPORTS
May 28, 1986
Richard Kirwan Ferguson, a native of Canada who finished third in the "Miracle Mile" in 1954, has died of cancer at the Eisenhower Medical Center in Rancho Mirage. Ferguson was 54. Ferguson, who died Saturday, finished behind Roger Bannister and John Landy in the mile run during a track meet 32 years ago at Vancouver.
SPORTS
April 16, 1989
Track and field athletes from Ivy League rivals Harvard and Yale joined forces to defeat a combined team from English universities Oxford and Cambridge in the rain at New Haven, Conn. The U.S. team defeated the British, 21-13, in the 32nd trans-Atlantic meet, a traditional event that has featured such legendary track and field athletes as Roger Bannister, the first man to run the mile faster than four minutes. The meet also was scored as a dual meet between Harvard and Yale, which the Crimson won, 88-75, as freshman sprinter Derrick Horner won the 100 and 200 meters, placed second in the long jump and anchored Harvard's winning 400-meter relay team.
SPORTS
May 6, 2004 | Elliott Teaford, Times Staff Writer
Four laps, four minutes, one mile. So simple, so tidy, yet so unattainable until a rainy evening 50 years ago today, when Roger Bannister, a 25-year-old medical student, became the first person to break the athletic equivalent of the sound barrier. "The four-minute mile had a beauty about it, a symmetry," Norris McWhirter, a track and field statistician and founder of the "Guinness Book of World Records" once said.
SPORTS
May 2, 2004 | From Associated Press
Fifty years ago, a young English medical student ran four laps around a cinder track at Oxford University on a dank, blustery May evening in front of about 1,000 spectators. With a late burst of speed, Roger Bannister shattered one of sport's most fabled physical and psychological barriers -- running a mile in under four minutes. Half a century later, that magic time -- 3:59.
SPORTS
May 8, 1994 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forty years ago today, a USC graduate named Parry O'Brien broke an athletic barrier and went on to set a standard few in sports have since surpassed. On May 8, 1954, on the floor of the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, O'Brien put the shot where every other post-World War II shotputter had been trying to put it--beyond the 60-foot mark. Thus, two track and field barriers had fallen within 48 hours.
SPORTS
May 6, 1994 | BUD GREENSPAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On May 6, 1954, Roger Bannister, completing his final year in medical school, arrived early at St. Mary's Hospital in London, honed the spikes on his track shoes, then took the train to Oxford, less than an hour away. There, he and fellow Olympians Chris Brasher and Chris Chataway were to represent the British Amateur Athletic Assn. in a mile race that evening at 6.
SPORTS
May 6, 1999 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just as in the cases of the seven-foot high jump, 60-foot shotput, 200-foot discus throw and 27-foot long jump, a track and field "barrier" can be broken only once. Milers had aspired for 20 years to be the first under four minutes. Two Swedes, Gunder Haegg and Arne Andersson, broke 4:02 shortly after World War II, but four minutes remained a barrier. In 1954, track people worldwide believed the first sub-four-minute mile was close at hand.
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