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Roger Boisjoly

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NEWS
January 28, 1987 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL, Times Staff Writer
Today marks the first anniversary of Roger Boisjoly's crippling rage. It was born in the angry fireball that consumed the space shuttle Challenger on Jan. 28, 1986, just 73 seconds into the heavens above Florida, and killed its seven crew members. It didn't have to happen. That's what troubled Boisjoly.
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OPINION
February 10, 2012
Breath of fresh air Re "Media gain access to L.A. County children's courts," Feb. 8 As a two-attorney couple who adopted a teenager from L.A.'s foster care system, we applaud Presiding Judge Michael Nash for removing the "cloak of invisibility" over the children's court. This was a reasonable step after decades of stalemate in Sacramento. The photo that accompanied the article showed a teenager holding a protest sign. He apparently doesn't mind having his name and picture published, so long as it's in the service of keeping the media from learning about other foster kids' experiences.
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NEWS
April 16, 1987
A federal judge ordered the release of court documents detailing an FBI investigation of Morton Thiokol Inc., builder of the solid rocket boosters that triggered the shuttle Challenger accident.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2012 | Ralph Vartabedian
The 1986 explosion that destroyed the space shuttle Challenger and killed seven astronauts shocked the nation, but for one rocket engineer the tragedy became a personal burden and created a lifelong quest to challenge the bureaucratic ethics that had caused the tragedy. Roger Boisjoly was an engineer at solid rocket booster manufacturer Morton Thiokol and had begun warning as early as 1985 that the joints in the boosters could fail in cold weather, leading to a catastrophic failure of the casing.
NEWS
April 4, 1987 | From the Washington Post
The FBI is conducting a "criminal investigation" of Morton Thiokol Inc., builder of the solid rocket boosters that caused the Challenger space shuttle disaster, according to a document filed in U.S. District Court here. No details about the investigation were revealed in the document, and it was not known if it relates to the Challenger accident in January, 1986.
NEWS
July 14, 1987
A redesigned rocket booster joint for the space shuttle is less reliable than the one that caused the Challenger explosion, Roger M. Boisjoly told the National Society of Professional Engineers in Denver. Boisjoly, who is now on long-term disability leave, was an engineer with Morton Thiokol Inc. and worked on the design of the rocket booster that failed. He and another engineer urged officials not to go forward with the Jan. 28, 1986, Challenger launch, but the launch was approved.
NEWS
May 20, 1986 | RUDY ABRAMSON, Times Staff Writer
Four days after receiving allegations that space shuttle documents had been destroyed at the Marshall Space Flight Center, the presidential commission investigating the loss of the shuttle Challenger said Monday that it has received the documents it needs to do its job.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2012 | Ralph Vartabedian
The 1986 explosion that destroyed the space shuttle Challenger and killed seven astronauts shocked the nation, but for one rocket engineer the tragedy became a personal burden and created a lifelong quest to challenge the bureaucratic ethics that had caused the tragedy. Roger Boisjoly was an engineer at solid rocket booster manufacturer Morton Thiokol and had begun warning as early as 1985 that the joints in the boosters could fail in cold weather, leading to a catastrophic failure of the casing.
NEWS
April 17, 1987 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL, Times Staff Writer
Substantial allegations of fraud, made secretly to FBI agents in Salt Lake City by employees of space shuttle rocket maker Morton Thiokol Inc. earlier this year, have resulted in a federal investigation of the Utah-based aerospace company, according to previously sealed documents released Thursday in U.S. District Court.
NEWS
January 29, 1987 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL, Times Staff Writer
Rocket engineer Roger Boisjoly, whose warnings to delay the ill-fated launch of the space shuttle Challenger were ignored by his superiors and space agency officials, filed a $1-billion defamation and antitrust suit against his employer Wednesday, on the first anniversary of the disaster. The suit, filed in federal court here, accuses Chicago-based rocket booster manufacturer Morton Thiokol Inc.
NEWS
September 2, 1988
A federal judge dismissed two multibillion-dollar lawsuits filed against Morton Thiokol by former engineer Roger Boisjoly, who warned against the disastrous launch of the space shuttle Challenger, said Robert Levin, a lawyer for Boisjoly. Levin told a Salt Lake City television station that U.S. District Judge David K. Winder had dismissed the $3-billion suits with prejudice, so they cannot be refiled.
NEWS
July 14, 1987
A redesigned rocket booster joint for the space shuttle is less reliable than the one that caused the Challenger explosion, Roger M. Boisjoly told the National Society of Professional Engineers in Denver. Boisjoly, who is now on long-term disability leave, was an engineer with Morton Thiokol Inc. and worked on the design of the rocket booster that failed. He and another engineer urged officials not to go forward with the Jan. 28, 1986, Challenger launch, but the launch was approved.
NEWS
April 17, 1987 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL, Times Staff Writer
Substantial allegations of fraud, made secretly to FBI agents in Salt Lake City by employees of space shuttle rocket maker Morton Thiokol Inc. earlier this year, have resulted in a federal investigation of the Utah-based aerospace company, according to previously sealed documents released Thursday in U.S. District Court.
NEWS
April 4, 1987 | From the Washington Post
The FBI is conducting a "criminal investigation" of Morton Thiokol Inc., builder of the solid rocket boosters that caused the Challenger space shuttle disaster, according to a document filed in U.S. District Court here. No details about the investigation were revealed in the document, and it was not known if it relates to the Challenger accident in January, 1986.
NEWS
January 29, 1987 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL, Times Staff Writer
Rocket engineer Roger Boisjoly, whose warnings to delay the ill-fated launch of the space shuttle Challenger were ignored by his superiors and space agency officials, filed a $1-billion defamation and antitrust suit against his employer Wednesday, on the first anniversary of the disaster. The suit, filed in federal court here, accuses Chicago-based rocket booster manufacturer Morton Thiokol Inc.
NEWS
January 28, 1987 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL, Times Staff Writer
Today marks the first anniversary of Roger Boisjoly's crippling rage. It was born in the angry fireball that consumed the space shuttle Challenger on Jan. 28, 1986, just 73 seconds into the heavens above Florida, and killed its seven crew members. It didn't have to happen. That's what troubled Boisjoly.
NEWS
May 11, 1986 | RUDY ABRAMSON, Times Staff Writer
Two Morton Thiokol Corp. engineers who opposed the ill-fated launching of the Challenger space shuttle last January have been assigned to new jobs, and investigators have questioned whether they were being punished for their role in the presidential inquiry into the tragedy. Testifying before a closed session of the Challenger investigating commission, Allan J.
NEWS
June 9, 1986 | MAURA DOLAN and WILLIAM C. REMPEL, Times Staff Writers
It had been two weeks since the horrifying explosion of the space shuttle Challenger, and the blue-ribbon investigating commission named by President Reagan was concluding one of its early closed meetings. Allan J. McDonald, an engineer for the company that built the shuttle's solid rocket boosters, sat with his face buried in his hands and wept. He had just revealed to the commission that he and other Morton Thiokol Inc.
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