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Roger Daltrey

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October 19, 2009 | Randy Lewis
What's the difference between hearing Roger Daltrey perform the Who's music when he's fronting the legendary band versus hearing him play those same songs solo? With the Who, you get Daltrey's voice, one of the Olympian wonders of classic rock; with Daltrey alone, you get an entire human being. Daltrey spent a generous amount of time sharing of himself during a nearly two-hour show Saturday at the historic Orpheum Theatre in downtown Los Angeles, the fifth concert on his first solo trek in nearly a quarter-century.
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NEWS
September 25, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Roger Daltrey of the Who and the Moody Blues will share the bill in April not at a concert but on a Caribbean cruise aboard the MSC Divina. The British rockers will take to the seas along with members of others 1960s and 1970s bands booked for the five-night cruise that begins in Miami. The theme of the cruise will be the 1970 Isle of Wight Festival, which is the last time Daltrey and the Moody Blues played at the same show. The Zombies, Carl Palmer of Emerson, Lake and Palmer, the Orchestra starring ELO, Starship, Little River Band and others join the lineup too. It's the second time the Moody Blues have scheduled a cruise for fans.
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NEWS
September 25, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Roger Daltrey of the Who and the Moody Blues will share the bill in April not at a concert but on a Caribbean cruise aboard the MSC Divina. The British rockers will take to the seas along with members of others 1960s and 1970s bands booked for the five-night cruise that begins in Miami. The theme of the cruise will be the 1970 Isle of Wight Festival, which is the last time Daltrey and the Moody Blues played at the same show. The Zombies, Carl Palmer of Emerson, Lake and Palmer, the Orchestra starring ELO, Starship, Little River Band and others join the lineup too. It's the second time the Moody Blues have scheduled a cruise for fans.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Few songwriters in British rock have had loftier goals, and more success, than Pete Townshend of the Who, and few works from the classic rock era are as accomplished and emotionally rich as "Quadrophenia," the Who's 1973 double-album rock opera focused on rebel youth in working class England. Townshend and longtime bandmate Roger Daltrey celebrated the four decades since its release in a concert at Staples Center on Wednesday night, presenting to a capacity crowd the melodically and thematically linked 80-minute work as it was originally sequenced -- as one big story to be appreciated as a whole.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1991 | LAUREN LIPTON
Take a close look at the guest star on Midnight Caller Friday, and you'll see that he bears an almost uncanny resemblance to Roger Daltrey, lead singer of the legendary British rock group the Who. Take another look: It is Roger Daltrey, who appears as a rock singer (what else?) on the NBC series set at a San Francisco radio station. But lest you think this is solely a case of art imitating life, "I don't play myself" in the episode, Daltrey says.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1998 | STEVE HOCHMAN
It was inevitable that some middle-aged singer would wind up doing classic-rock favorites in front of an orchestra. David Coverdale, maybe. Or David St. Hubbins in a lost "Spinal Tap" sequel. But the Who's Roger Daltrey? Yes, the generally respectable Daltrey did front the British Rock Symphony at the Universal Amphitheatre on Thursday, doing songs not only of his band, but also the Beatles, Rolling Stones, Pink Floyd and Procol Harum. And good for him.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1994 | RICHARD CROMELIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
People tend to observe their 50th birthdays in special ways, but no one has marked the milestone quite the way Roger Daltrey did last February. The English singer rented Carnegie Hall for two nights, hired an orchestra, collected guest stars ranging from Eddie Vedder to the Chieftains and sang the music that made him famous--the songs Pete Townshend wrote for the Who. Now the "Daltrey Sings Townshend" show is on a U.S. tour that arrives at the Greek Theatre on Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1999 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roger Daltrey's trademark blond curls may have been sheared into a short, close-cropped do, but the 55-year-old lead singer of the legendary Who remains quite a charismatic, handsome figure. Showtime's outrageous comedy series "Rude Awakening" has brought him to Los Angeles. He has a recurring role on the show as a flamboyant rock star who has entered a 12-step program, and it was time for him to drop in on the action once again.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1994 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Frank Sinatra, Natalie Cole and Raphael are among the wide variety of acts coming to Los Angeles as part of the expanded summer schedules of the Greek Theatre and the Universal Amphitheatre. Those artists are part of a season skewed toward the older segments of the pop audience--including a Greek appearance by Roger Daltrey singing the music of his Who mate Pete Townshend on July 1 to complement the July 13-31 run of "The Who's Tommy" Broadway production at the Universal.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2003 | James Verini, Special to The Times
Stomping and strutting like a peacock around a rehearsal space on a shabby corner in Burbank, Roger Daltrey looks like nothing less than the eternal youth of rock 'n' roll embodied. The once and future frontman for the Who and a bona fide rock demigod, Daltrey seems only slightly dulled from that summer 34 years ago when he belted out "I Can See for Miles" at a little concert called Woodstock and permanently redefined the way rock singers were supposed to work.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2011
'Carnal Knowledge' Ann-Margret was nominated for a supporting actress Oscar in Mike Nichols' controversial 1971 drama. She stole the film as Susan, a party girl who enters into a horrific relationship with a womanizer (Jack Nicholson). 'Tommy' The actress picked up a Golden Globe and lead actress Oscar nod as pinball wizard Tommy's (Roger Daltrey) outrageous mother in Ken Russell's electric 1975 adaptation of the Who's seminal rock opera. 'Viva Las Vegas' Ann-Margret reunited with her "Bye Bye Birdie" director, George Sidney, for this rollicking 1964 Elvis Presley musical in which she plays swimming instructor Rusty Martin, who is romanced by Presley's Grand Prix racer, Lucky.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2009 | Randy Lewis
What's the difference between hearing Roger Daltrey perform the Who's music when he's fronting the legendary band versus hearing him play those same songs solo? With the Who, you get Daltrey's voice, one of the Olympian wonders of classic rock; with Daltrey alone, you get an entire human being. Daltrey spent a generous amount of time sharing of himself during a nearly two-hour show Saturday at the historic Orpheum Theatre in downtown Los Angeles, the fifth concert on his first solo trek in nearly a quarter-century.
NATIONAL
December 8, 2008 | Cynthia Dizikes, Dizikes is a writer in our Washington bureau.
Barbra Streisand, a vocal critic of President Bush, visited the White House this weekend but kept the gloves on. The Brooklyn-born diva was one of six performing artists celebrated at this year's Kennedy Center Honors, one of the most prestigious awards in the arts.
NEWS
August 24, 2008 | Geoff Boucher; Tony Barboza; Randy Harvey
SOUNDBOARD Who wants to be a roadie? Want to be a substitute for another guy? It ain't cheap. The Who has an auction at eBay for a fan who wants to pay to be a roadie for a day during its U.S. tour. The bidding hit $20,000 after four days, and it may go higher by Sunday's cutoff. The auction is for a good cause: Roger Daltrey is saving up for a villa in the south of France. No, that's just a joke. The auction is a fundraiser for the Santa Monica nonprofit group K9 Connection, which brings at-risk teenagers together with homeless dogs.
TRAVEL
January 3, 2008 | By Liam Gowing, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The feeling of dread was overwhelming as I rendezvoused with my band and noted the absence of our foremost member, drummer Chris Gailfoil. Stricken with stage-four cancer, Chris had been teetering on the brink of death for weeks, and seeing his seat uncharacteristically empty, I couldn't help but assume the worst. It was a gut-wrenching scene, made all the more incredible because it occurred not at a hospital, but in a rehearsal room at the MGM Grand's Garden Arena in Las Vegas.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2007 | Geoff Boucher
Is there a big enough movie to tell the tale of Keith Moon? Rock singer Roger Daltrey hoped to produce a feature film about Moon, his late friend and fellow member of the Who, but after years of searching can't find a screenplay that matches the robust and reckless life of the iconic drummer. "The trick is you have to find a script that is really worth shooting," Daltrey said this week while in town promoting the new documentary "Amazing Journey: The Story of the Who."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2003 | Stuart Miller, Special to The Times
Meet the new History Channel. Not the same as the old History Channel. The network, occasionally criticized for stodgy, static programming, wants to make sure baby boomers and younger viewers won't be bored again. So History is cranking it up with new series featuring a more dynamic, aggressive style -- leading the charge is the Who's lead singer, Roger Daltrey, who brings his irreverence and charismatic swagger to "Extreme History," the highest-profile new show.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2001 | EMANUELLE SOICHET, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A s the lead vocalist in era-defining anthems such as "My Generation," Roger Daltrey for many Americans remains the force behind the rock band the Who. But since his movie debut in the 1975 film version of the rock opera "Tommy" and subsequent gigs in theater and television, the musician has been trying to recast himself as an actor as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2004 | From Associated Press
The Who may be returning, again. In a posting on his website, Pete Townshend says that he and singer Roger Daltrey are planning to get together for the first Who studio album in more than two decades. "Roger and I [will] meet in mid-December to play what we have written," Townshend, the guitarist and primary songwriter of the group, writes. "If we move ahead from there, we may have a CD ready to release in the spring. My working title for the project -- 'Who2' -- is only partly tongue-in-cheek."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2003 | Stuart Miller, Special to The Times
Meet the new History Channel. Not the same as the old History Channel. The network, occasionally criticized for stodgy, static programming, wants to make sure baby boomers and younger viewers won't be bored again. So History is cranking it up with new series featuring a more dynamic, aggressive style -- leading the charge is the Who's lead singer, Roger Daltrey, who brings his irreverence and charismatic swagger to "Extreme History," the highest-profile new show.
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