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NEWS
February 15, 2011 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
When Rooster Cogburn, Jeff Bridges' gravel-voiced federal marshal in Joel and Ethan Coen's "True Grit," defends his tendency to shoot first and ask questions later in a courtroom scene, he is a figure engulfed in shadows. Slowly, a shaft of light streams through the courtroom's giant windows, revealing Cogburn's craggy, bearded face to the film's protagonist, 14-year-old Mattie Ross (Hailee Steinfeld), and the audience for the very first time. The dramatic effect, announcing the movie's larger-than-life antihero through light and darkness, is the work of Academy Award-nominated cinematographer Roger Deakins.
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NEWS
February 15, 2011 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
When Rooster Cogburn, Jeff Bridges' gravel-voiced federal marshal in Joel and Ethan Coen's "True Grit," defends his tendency to shoot first and ask questions later in a courtroom scene, he is a figure engulfed in shadows. Slowly, a shaft of light streams through the courtroom's giant windows, revealing Cogburn's craggy, bearded face to the film's protagonist, 14-year-old Mattie Ross (Hailee Steinfeld), and the audience for the very first time. The dramatic effect, announcing the movie's larger-than-life antihero through light and darkness, is the work of Academy Award-nominated cinematographer Roger Deakins.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2007 | Cristy Lytal, Special to The Times
When Roger Deakins applied to England's National Film and Television School for the first time, the man who has become one of the world's most respected cinematographers was informed that his stills weren't "filmic." Today, he sits in a sun-drenched beach cottage in Santa Monica and contemplates the concept. "I had this big discussion with [the head of the school] the second time I applied," says Deakins, now 58 years old. "I said, 'The first time you said it wasn't filmic.'
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2009 | Susan Salter Reynolds
Wildwood A Journey Through Trees Roger Deakin Free Press: 392 pp., $26.95 Can someone tell me why old-fashioned naturalists write so beautifully and present-day environmentalists write so badly? Deakin's writing, in this and his previous book, "Waterlog: A Swimmer's Journey Through Britain," is teeming with creation. Bluebells, badgers, cow parsley, hazel, hedgerows, foxglove, rooks, robins and small-leaved limes -- this is pagan England, land of Celts and fairies.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2009 | Susan Salter Reynolds
Wildwood A Journey Through Trees Roger Deakin Free Press: 392 pp., $26.95 Can someone tell me why old-fashioned naturalists write so beautifully and present-day environmentalists write so badly? Deakin's writing, in this and his previous book, "Waterlog: A Swimmer's Journey Through Britain," is teeming with creation. Bluebells, badgers, cow parsley, hazel, hedgerows, foxglove, rooks, robins and small-leaved limes -- this is pagan England, land of Celts and fairies.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2001 | RICHARD NATALE, Richard Natale is a regular contributor to Calendar
A beautiful sunset is a beautiful sunset no matter who's filming it--and that's a thought that disturbs Roger Deakins, perhaps the most acclaimed and sought-after cinematographer currently working in Hollywood. "What I hate about modern cinematography is how simplistic it is," says the lanky, 52-year-old Deakins, sitting in the living room of his custom-built Santa Monica Craftsman-style home. "The picture is either pretty or sensationalistic.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2009 | Susan King
The American Society of Cinematographers and the NAACP Image Awards both announced their nominations Wednesday for the best of 2008. The ASC awards cover feature film, while the Image Awards nominations span movies, TV, music and literature. For the second consecutive year, Roger Deakins earned double nominations for the ASC's outstanding achievement award. Deakins received nominations for his work on two period films: "Revolutionary Road" and "The Reader."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1992
Association: LOS ANGELES FILM CRITICS Picture: Bugsy (Drama); Beauty and Beast (Animated) Actor: Nick Nolte, The Prince of Tides Actress: Mercedes Ruehl, The Fisher King Supporting Actor: Michael Lerner, Barton Fink Supporting Actress: Jane Horrocks, Life Is Sweet Director: Barry Levinson, Bugsy Cinematographer: Roger Deakins, Barton Fink and Homicide Writer: James Toback, Bugsy Association: GOLDEN GLOBE AWARDS Picture: Bugsy (Drama); Beauty and Beast (Musical) Actor: Nick Nolte, Prince of
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2008 | Kenneth Turan
This week is an ideal one to check out the tremendous resource that is the UCLA Film and Television Archive, which screens films at the Billy Wilder Theater at the Hammer Museum in Westwood. Playing Friday night is a nifty pre-Code double bill, William Powell in "Street of Chance" and Lew Ayres in "Okay, America!" And Wednesday, as part of its "The Movie That Inspired Me" series, top cinematographer Roger Deakins talks to Curtis Hanson about Jean-Pierre Melville's masterful "Army of Shadows."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2013 | By Susan King
The cinematographers of "Anna Karenina," "Les Miserables," "Life of Pi," "Lincoln" and "Skyfall" were nominated Wednesday morning for outstanding achievement in the feature film category for the 27th  American Society of Cinematographers Awards. All five cinematographers are previous ASC Awards nominees. Roger Deakins earned his 11th ASC nomination for the James Bond blockbuster, "Skyfall. " He previously won for the 1994 drama "The Shawshank Redemption" and 2001 thriller "The Man Who Wasn't There.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2009 | Susan King
The American Society of Cinematographers and the NAACP Image Awards both announced their nominations Wednesday for the best of 2008. The ASC awards cover feature film, while the Image Awards nominations span movies, TV, music and literature. For the second consecutive year, Roger Deakins earned double nominations for the ASC's outstanding achievement award. Deakins received nominations for his work on two period films: "Revolutionary Road" and "The Reader."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2007 | Cristy Lytal, Special to The Times
When Roger Deakins applied to England's National Film and Television School for the first time, the man who has become one of the world's most respected cinematographers was informed that his stills weren't "filmic." Today, he sits in a sun-drenched beach cottage in Santa Monica and contemplates the concept. "I had this big discussion with [the head of the school] the second time I applied," says Deakins, now 58 years old. "I said, 'The first time you said it wasn't filmic.'
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2001 | RICHARD NATALE, Richard Natale is a regular contributor to Calendar
A beautiful sunset is a beautiful sunset no matter who's filming it--and that's a thought that disturbs Roger Deakins, perhaps the most acclaimed and sought-after cinematographer currently working in Hollywood. "What I hate about modern cinematography is how simplistic it is," says the lanky, 52-year-old Deakins, sitting in the living room of his custom-built Santa Monica Craftsman-style home. "The picture is either pretty or sensationalistic.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1998
"L.A. Confidential" was voted best film of 1997 by the National Society of Film Critics, finishing ahead of "The Sweet Hereafter" and "Boogie Nights," the 48-member group announced Sunday. The results capped a sweep of major critics awards for "L.A. Confidential," which had previously been chosen best picture by the National Board of Review, the New York Film Critics Circle and the Los Angeles Film Critics Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2008 | KEVIN CRUST
When Jean-Pierre Melville's film "Army of Shadows" was released in the U.S. in 2006, 37 years after being unjustly dismissed by French critics, it became an immediate classic. An almost clinical psychological study of the French Resistance during World War II (of which Melville was part), and based on Joseph Kessel's novel, it chronicles stoic day-to-day perseverance in the face of Nazi occupation.
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