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Roger F Martin

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BUSINESS
September 6, 1988 | TOM FURLONG
The banking regulator most directly involved in the attempted rescue of American Savings is Roger F. Martin, a 61-year-old businessman from Wisconsin who joined the three-member Federal Home Loan Bank Board a year ago. From the beginning of his tenure on the board, Martin has had the difficult and highly charged task of finding new capital for American Savings. It did not take long for Martin, although likable, to earn a reputation as a loose cannon on the deck of the bank board.
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BUSINESS
September 6, 1988 | TOM FURLONG
The banking regulator most directly involved in the attempted rescue of American Savings is Roger F. Martin, a 61-year-old businessman from Wisconsin who joined the three-member Federal Home Loan Bank Board a year ago. From the beginning of his tenure on the board, Martin has had the difficult and highly charged task of finding new capital for American Savings. It did not take long for Martin, although likable, to earn a reputation as a loose cannon on the deck of the bank board.
NEWS
July 12, 1987 | United Press International
President Reagan Friday named businessman Roger F. Martin to the Federal Home Loan Bank Board to succeed Lee Henkel, a controversial member of the panel that oversees savings and loans.
BUSINESS
April 6, 1989
Roger F. Martin has resigned as a member of the Federal Home Loan Bank Board effective May 8. Martin would have left the agency at the end of his term June 30. Martin, who joined the bank board on Aug. 7, 1987, to fill an unexpired term, said he is returning to private life. Martin is the second of the three board members to resign. On March 30, Lawrence J. White announced his resignation, effective Aug. 18.
NEWS
October 18, 1990 | From Associated Press
Three senators under investigation for their ties to Charles H. Keating Jr., ex-owner of the failed Lincoln Savings & Loan, had more extensive dealings with him than they acknowledged publicly, Senate documents show. The Senate Ethics Committee documents detail efforts made by Democratic Sens. Alan Cranston of California, Dennis DeConcini of Arizona and Donald W. Riegle Jr. of Michigan on Keating's behalf. They also shed new light on some of Keating's fund-raising efforts.
BUSINESS
May 4, 1988 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, Times Staff Writer
Accusing federal regulators of secrecy and stonewalling, House Banking Committee Chairman Fernand St Germain (D-R.I.) said Tuesday that he will press his investigation of the Federal Home Loan Bank Board's campaign to find a buyer for crippled Financial Corp. of America. An angry St Germain said the bank board, in its eagerness to find a buyer, had been persistently ignoring his requests for information about Irvine-based FCA.
NEWS
October 24, 1990 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Senate Ethics Committee on Tuesday set public hearings Nov. 15 on ties between savings and loan magnate Charles H. Keating Jr. and five senators. In deciding on the hearings, the panel reportedly rejected a recommendation by special counsel Robert S. Bennett to launch a full-scale inquiry into the actions of Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) and two of his Democratic colleagues and to drop charges against two others, one a Democrat and the other a Republican.
BUSINESS
January 8, 1988 | TOM FURLONG, Times Staff Writer
Talks aimed at selling American Savings & Loan Assn., the nation's largest thrift, to Ford Motor Co., were abruptly broken off Thursday following days of intense speculation that a deal was at hand. The news adds to the uncertainty over American Savings and its parent company, Irvine-based Financial Corp. of America. FCA's fortunes have deteriorated markedly in the past year as federal regulators have searched in vain to find a buyer.
NEWS
October 19, 1990 | RONALD J. OSTROW and SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Senate Ethics Committee on Thursday began pivotal deliberations on the "Keating Five," amid indications that it will approve a full-scale investigation of actions that Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) and two other key Democratic senators took to help savings and loan magnate Charles H. Keating Jr. The panel's closed-door session came with the disclosure of new documents showing the lengths to which Cranston and Sens. Dennis DeConcini of Arizona and Donald W. Riegle Jr.
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