Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRoger Friedland
IN THE NEWS

Roger Friedland

FEATURED ARTICLES
BOOKS
December 29, 1996 | JONATHAN KIRSCH
As Karen Armstrong emphasizes in "Jerusalem: One City, Three Faiths," Jerusalem was founded by an obscure people called the Jebusites at some unknowable date in the distant past. The 3,000th anniversary now being celebrated is roughly based on the supposed date of the conquest of Jerusalem by King David, an event that is reported only in the Bible and, even according to the Bible, took place long after Jerusalem first came into existence.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BOOKS
September 3, 2006 | Jonathan Levi, Jonathan Levi is a founding editor of Granta magazine and the author of the novel "A Guide for the Perplexed."
IN 1933, Ernest Hemingway took a break from hunting kudu on the Serengeti to write the introduction to "This Must Be the Place," Jimmie Charters' memoir about his Parisian bar, the Dingo. "Once a woman has opened a salon, it is certain that she will write her memoirs," Hemingway wrote. "If you go to the salon you will be in the memoirs. Now a saloon, or bar, is different.
Advertisement
BOOKS
September 3, 2006 | Jonathan Levi, Jonathan Levi is a founding editor of Granta magazine and the author of the novel "A Guide for the Perplexed."
IN 1933, Ernest Hemingway took a break from hunting kudu on the Serengeti to write the introduction to "This Must Be the Place," Jimmie Charters' memoir about his Parisian bar, the Dingo. "Once a woman has opened a salon, it is certain that she will write her memoirs," Hemingway wrote. "If you go to the salon you will be in the memoirs. Now a saloon, or bar, is different.
BOOKS
December 29, 1996 | JONATHAN KIRSCH
As Karen Armstrong emphasizes in "Jerusalem: One City, Three Faiths," Jerusalem was founded by an obscure people called the Jebusites at some unknowable date in the distant past. The 3,000th anniversary now being celebrated is roughly based on the supposed date of the conquest of Jerusalem by King David, an event that is reported only in the Bible and, even according to the Bible, took place long after Jerusalem first came into existence.
NEWS
October 29, 1989
In your letters column (Book Review, Oct. 15), there is a commentary, from an Arab perspective, on Roger Friedland and Richard Hecht's review of Amos Elon's new book, "Jerusalem: City of Mirrors." What follows are some comments about the Friedland-Hecht review from a Jewish perspective. "Only in 1949," the reviewers write, " after voices were raised in the United Nations to internationalize the city, did Israel move its capital to Jerusalem."
BOOKS
October 15, 1989
In their review of Amos Elon's "Jerusalem: City of Mirrors" (Book Review, Oct. 1), Roger Friedland and Richard Hecht essentially revise history by writing: "The Muslims claim the cleared platform of Solomon's Temple as the launching pad for Mohammed's night journey to heaven. In fact, the Koran does not mention Jerusalem by name and the city was probably identified with the sacred text's 'far distant mosque' only a century later by Damascus-based Umayyad sultans to whom Mecca was denied."
OPINION
December 24, 2006 | David L. Ulin, David L. Ulin is book editor of The Times.
FOR MANY PEOPLE in publishing, the firing of Judith Regan this month represented a bit of instant karma, cosmic comeuppance at its most profound. Regan, most recently in the news for her part in the aborted O.J. Simpson book fiasco over "If I Did It," is the kind of publisher book people love to hate. Over the years, she's brought out work by Sean Hannity and Rush Limbaugh, Jenna Jameson and Jose Canseco.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2012 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
Barack Obama had his Greek columns. Mitt Romney is turning to Frank Lloyd Wright. When the Republican National Convention begins Monday inside the Tampa Bay Times Forum, a 19,500-seat arena in Tampa, Fla., that's home during hockey season to the NHL's Lightning, the stage will be crowded with large video screens framed in wood. Actually the "wood" will be made of vinyl and various laminates, but it'll read on television as cherry, mahogany and walnut. The inspiration for the set, said Jim Fenhagen, lead production designer for the convention, is Wright's residential architecture, which often featured long horizontal bands of wood-framed windows.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2006 | Christopher Hawthorne, Times Staff Writer
IT won't take long for readers of "The Fellowship," an ambitious new study of Frank Lloyd Wright by Roger Friedland and Harold Zellman, to realize that the book is no ordinary exercise in architectural history. Maybe it will happen on Page 8, when the authors describe the teenage Wright daydreaming about sex, drifting into his "moist dream space."
NEWS
April 24, 2000 | BRENDA REES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The heart of Crestwood Hills, a woodsy enclave in the hills above Sunset Boulevard on Los Angeles' Westside, is a cooperative nursery school where parents are required to volunteer twice a month to help their children learn about silkworms, build sandcastles and touch the sky on a swing.
OPINION
February 16, 1997 | Joel Kotkin, Joel Kotkin, a contributing editor to Opinion, is the John M. Olin Fellow at the Pepperdine Institute for Public Policy and a senior fellow at the Pacific Research Institute
In the 1980s, Los Angeles seemed poised to assume its long-envisioned role as the corporate and business center of the North American end of the Pacific Rim. Today, the region more resembles the opposite: a production-dominated artisan economy, designing and manufacturing everything from garments to sitcoms to education software.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|