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January 19, 1995 | JAN BRESLAUER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Old radicals don't die, they just get recycled as pop imagery. In the 1970s, the bearded and bereted Che Guevara graced a poster that was de rigueur for campus lefties' dorm rooms. More recently, the mark of Malcolm X turned up as the logo on a baseball cap. Now, with the Melvin and Mario Van Peebles film "Panther," at least two stage works and a number of books and articles on the Black Panthers due out this year, Huey P.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2013 | By Reed Johnson
Like Walt Whitman, Roger Guenveur Smith contains multitudes. In various past one-man shows he has portrayed Huey P. Newton, baseball brawling immortals Juan Marichal and John Roseboro and dozens of others, while probing the great American themes of identity, individuality, ethnicity, class and power. His latest solo endeavor, "Rodney King," with an original sound design by Marc Anthony Thompson and lighting by Jose Lopez, is playing through Sunday at the Kirk Douglas Theatre in Culver City as part of RADAR L.A., International Festival of Contemporary Theater.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2008 | Charlotte Stoudt, Special to The Times
She wants fidelity, he wants freedom. She's thinking of children, he thinks of his work as offspring. Writer-director-performer Roger Guenveur Smith plumbs this familiar romantic crevasse in "Iceland," his rambling, trippy choreopoem playing this weekend at REDCAT. What he finds is visually dazzling, but a little empty. The setup is simple: The charismatic Smith portrays a painter in fresh love with a Jamaican dancer (the superb Treva Offutt, formerly of Urban Bush Women).
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
The three solo performance pieces being presented on separate bills at the Kirk Douglas Theatre - Luis Alfaro's "St. Jude," Roger Guenveur Smith's "Rodney King," and Trieu Tran's "Uncle Ho to Uncle Sam" - haven't much in common stylistically. And why should they? They're the product of different sensibilities in a theatrical form dedicated to celebrating radical individuality. But taken together these DouglasPlus offerings, which are part of the Radar L.A. festival, present a portrait of an America made up of insiders and outsiders.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1993 | JAN BRESLAUER
Ahhh, a new year and so many unknowns: Will Jay, Dave and Johnny be genetically spliced to produce the Ultimate Talk Show Host? Will the Yuppie-in-Chief name Stevie Nicks to run the NEA? Who will Sinead pick as her tag team partner against Madonna and the Pope? Will the activist group AWOE (Actresses With One Eyebrow) demand that one of them be chosen to play Frida Kahlo? Oh well, frivolity aside, one thing is certain: You'll be hearing these names and seeing these faces in the next 365.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2013 | By Reed Johnson
Like Walt Whitman, Roger Guenveur Smith contains multitudes. In various past one-man shows he has portrayed Huey P. Newton, baseball brawling immortals Juan Marichal and John Roseboro and dozens of others, while probing the great American themes of identity, individuality, ethnicity, class and power. His latest solo endeavor, "Rodney King," with an original sound design by Marc Anthony Thompson and lighting by Jose Lopez, is playing through Sunday at the Kirk Douglas Theatre in Culver City as part of RADAR L.A., International Festival of Contemporary Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2011 | By Scott Timberg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
At a youthful 55, Roger Guenveur Smith is at least a few decades too old to carry baseball cards in his wallet, but the one he takes out to show has a special meaning. The memories he discusses on the outdoor patio of an Echo Park coffee shop are not serene: The card — which he found at a swap meet a few years ago — is a replacement for one he burned more than 40 years ago. On the card is Juan Marichal — then a San Francisco Giants pitcher — who, one summer day in 1965, at bat in the third inning of a close game, hauled off and hit Dodgers catcher John Roseboro, who he thought had provoked him. He hit Roseboro hard, with his bat, in the head, three times — enough to draw blood from a 2-inch gash.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
The three solo performance pieces being presented on separate bills at the Kirk Douglas Theatre - Luis Alfaro's "St. Jude," Roger Guenveur Smith's "Rodney King," and Trieu Tran's "Uncle Ho to Uncle Sam" - haven't much in common stylistically. And why should they? They're the product of different sensibilities in a theatrical form dedicated to celebrating radical individuality. But taken together these DouglasPlus offerings, which are part of the Radar L.A. festival, present a portrait of an America made up of insiders and outsiders.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 1992 | Aleene MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Anniversary Time "Out in Front," a weekend of theater, comedy, music, poetry and dance celebrating the Mark Taper Forum's 25th season, will take place on the Taper's stage Oct. 1-4. American Indian musician John Trudell and his Graffiti Man band and the Latino comedy troupe Culture Clash will perform each evening.
NEWS
June 28, 2007 | Mike Boehm
Filmmaker Spike Lee will branch into stage directing with a Broadway revival next spring of "Stalag 17," the prototypical prisoner-of-war story about captured American airmen trying to escape a German compound during World War II. Lee said in a statement that he responded to producer Michael Abbott's overtures because of his admiration for Billy Wilder's 1953 film adaptation of the 1951 play by Donald Bevan and Edmund Trzcinski, based on their POW experiences.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2011 | By Scott Timberg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
At a youthful 55, Roger Guenveur Smith is at least a few decades too old to carry baseball cards in his wallet, but the one he takes out to show has a special meaning. The memories he discusses on the outdoor patio of an Echo Park coffee shop are not serene: The card — which he found at a swap meet a few years ago — is a replacement for one he burned more than 40 years ago. On the card is Juan Marichal — then a San Francisco Giants pitcher — who, one summer day in 1965, at bat in the third inning of a close game, hauled off and hit Dodgers catcher John Roseboro, who he thought had provoked him. He hit Roseboro hard, with his bat, in the head, three times — enough to draw blood from a 2-inch gash.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2008 | Charlotte Stoudt, Special to The Times
She wants fidelity, he wants freedom. She's thinking of children, he thinks of his work as offspring. Writer-director-performer Roger Guenveur Smith plumbs this familiar romantic crevasse in "Iceland," his rambling, trippy choreopoem playing this weekend at REDCAT. What he finds is visually dazzling, but a little empty. The setup is simple: The charismatic Smith portrays a painter in fresh love with a Jamaican dancer (the superb Treva Offutt, formerly of Urban Bush Women).
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1995 | JAN BRESLAUER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Old radicals don't die, they just get recycled as pop imagery. In the 1970s, the bearded and bereted Che Guevara graced a poster that was de rigueur for campus lefties' dorm rooms. More recently, the mark of Malcolm X turned up as the logo on a baseball cap. Now, with the Melvin and Mario Van Peebles film "Panther," at least two stage works and a number of books and articles on the Black Panthers due out this year, Huey P.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1993 | JAN BRESLAUER
Ahhh, a new year and so many unknowns: Will Jay, Dave and Johnny be genetically spliced to produce the Ultimate Talk Show Host? Will the Yuppie-in-Chief name Stevie Nicks to run the NEA? Who will Sinead pick as her tag team partner against Madonna and the Pope? Will the activist group AWOE (Actresses With One Eyebrow) demand that one of them be chosen to play Frida Kahlo? Oh well, frivolity aside, one thing is certain: You'll be hearing these names and seeing these faces in the next 365.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1992
"Santa Monica Arts Festival 1992," a free event featuring theater, performance, dance, music, storytelling, folk and contemporary arts, books, family programming and international foods, will be held Sunday from noon to 7 p.m. at the Santa Monica Pier. Produced by Community Arts Resources (CARS), it is a counter-celebration of the 500th anniversary of the Columbus expedition. Scheduled performances include the Cahuilla Bird Singers at 2:15 p.m.
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