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Roger Herman

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June 11, 2000 | HUNTER DROHOJOWSKA-PHILP, Hunter Drohojowska-Philp is a regular contributor to Calendar
Roger Herman lives life large. His dark green house with the bright blue door towers above the bungalows of his Elysian Park neighbors. A friendly but huge bull mastiff and Great Dane greet a wary visitor. The interior is as cozy as a warehouse. His industrial-strength oil paintings are stored in racks. The white walls are papered with variations of 9-by-5-foot woodblock prints of tanks, ranch houses and vases of flowers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2009 | Leah Ollman
Whether you're reading this in print or online, it's likely that the meaning of these words matters more to you than their visual form. The elegance of written language's delivery system has largely become secondary to its efficiency. Not so for the three artists in "Palimpsests," a thoroughly intriguing show at Tarryn Teresa. Each explores the sensual presence of words in time and space. In their work, message and medium resume an intimate relationship, not one that is sacrosanct but pliable, in turns surprising, self-referential, contradictory, charming, wry. A palimpsest is traditionally defined as a parchment or other material whose writing has been effaced to make room for a new entry.
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MAGAZINE
September 24, 2000 | BARBARA THORNBURG
For Roger Herman, building a house is like making a piece of art: first comes the vision, then the refinements. "When I make a woodblock I have an image in mind," says the painter, printmaker, ceramist and professor of painting at UCLA's Department of Art. "I paint on wood and then start cutting it out, [but] I still don't know how it's going to look. Then I print and, depending on the paper and inks, it takes on a different appearance. "Then there are always the surprises," he adds.
MAGAZINE
June 11, 2006 | Michael Webb, Michael Webb is the author, most recently, of "Art/Invention/House." He is also a contributing writer for Architectural Digest.
Peter Alexander Having a magnificent workspace doesn't guarantee that the art will be great, but it sure doesn't hurt. Peter Alexander moved from a horse barn behind a Victorian house in West Adams to a Venice garage, where he cleaned up the grease pit and converted it into a lap pool. He now has an expansive metal shed in Santa Monica in which to read, sleep, think and--when the spirit moves him--get to work.
MAGAZINE
June 11, 2006 | Michael Webb, Michael Webb is the author, most recently, of "Art/Invention/House." He is also a contributing writer for Architectural Digest.
Peter Alexander Having a magnificent workspace doesn't guarantee that the art will be great, but it sure doesn't hurt. Peter Alexander moved from a horse barn behind a Victorian house in West Adams to a Venice garage, where he cleaned up the grease pit and converted it into a lap pool. He now has an expansive metal shed in Santa Monica in which to read, sleep, think and--when the spirit moves him--get to work.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1986 | ROBERT McDONALD
He is one of the most highly respected younger artists now working in Los Angeles. His vision is mature, his style is distinctive, and his works are memorable. The source of their strengths, however, remains a mystery. But that is perhaps as it should be. Roger Herman comes from the Saarland, an industrial area disputed for many years by France and Germany, now a part of the German Federal Republic. His very name reflects those two national influences.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2009 | Leah Ollman
Whether you're reading this in print or online, it's likely that the meaning of these words matters more to you than their visual form. The elegance of written language's delivery system has largely become secondary to its efficiency. Not so for the three artists in "Palimpsests," a thoroughly intriguing show at Tarryn Teresa. Each explores the sensual presence of words in time and space. In their work, message and medium resume an intimate relationship, not one that is sacrosanct but pliable, in turns surprising, self-referential, contradictory, charming, wry. A palimpsest is traditionally defined as a parchment or other material whose writing has been effaced to make room for a new entry.
HOME & GARDEN
December 13, 2007 | Lisa Boone
After 2 1/2 years, Flux gallery in Chinatown will close its doors at the end of the year. But in true holiday spirit, the reason for its closure is a happy one. After adopting their 28-month-old daughter, Opal, this year, owners Lilith and Eliot Rockett have found themselves too busy to juggle creating art, parenting and fronting a gallery.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1988 | MARLENA DONOHUE
Art fit for a small museum offers four good size solo exhibitions and another satellite show of some two dozen New York artists. Mary Corse shows black paintings modulated into atmospheric surfaces with glitter, as well as glossy Miminal grids built from black ceramic squares. The work straddles the fence between ruminations on surface and pure unadulterated glitz.
MAGAZINE
November 21, 1993 | SUSAN HEEGER
For artist Roger Herman, gardening is no orderly exercise in color and form. Like his enormous paintings--dense, lush outbursts of oil on canvas--his Elysian Park landscape is a foray into controlled confusion. "I like to experiment, do something, see what happens," he says. "I rarely interfere with that process."
MAGAZINE
September 24, 2000 | BARBARA THORNBURG
For Roger Herman, building a house is like making a piece of art: first comes the vision, then the refinements. "When I make a woodblock I have an image in mind," says the painter, printmaker, ceramist and professor of painting at UCLA's Department of Art. "I paint on wood and then start cutting it out, [but] I still don't know how it's going to look. Then I print and, depending on the paper and inks, it takes on a different appearance. "Then there are always the surprises," he adds.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2000 | HUNTER DROHOJOWSKA-PHILP, Hunter Drohojowska-Philp is a regular contributor to Calendar
Roger Herman lives life large. His dark green house with the bright blue door towers above the bungalows of his Elysian Park neighbors. A friendly but huge bull mastiff and Great Dane greet a wary visitor. The interior is as cozy as a warehouse. His industrial-strength oil paintings are stored in racks. The white walls are papered with variations of 9-by-5-foot woodblock prints of tanks, ranch houses and vases of flowers.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1986 | ROBERT McDONALD
He is one of the most highly respected younger artists now working in Los Angeles. His vision is mature, his style is distinctive, and his works are memorable. The source of their strengths, however, remains a mystery. But that is perhaps as it should be. Roger Herman comes from the Saarland, an industrial area disputed for many years by France and Germany, now a part of the German Federal Republic. His very name reflects those two national influences.
NEWS
September 7, 2012 | By Lisa Boone
Created to whet your appetite for the Ken Price ceramics retrospective opening Sept. 16 at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, "The Planter Show" opened Thursday with a delightful collection of more than 200 handmade plant containers by established and emerging artists.  "We wanted to give people another layer of context to the Price show," said Bettina Korek, director of the arts events group ForYourArt , at the opening Thursday night.  ...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1997 | SUSAN KANDEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Roger Herman's paintings at Ace Contemporary Exhibitions are deceptive. However simple, even bland, they first appear, they open onto a variety of complex questions. Each work consists of a group of paintings of different sizes (some intimate in scale, others approaching the monumental), arranged on the wall in an irregular grid.
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