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NEWS
June 13, 1988 | BOB SIPCHEN, Times Staff Writer
Paul Monette sat on the terrace of his hillside home, pondering the Big Questions: Life and Death. Love and Hate. Life has taught Monette a lot about love and death lately. But the subject of hatred, which he seems to be encountering more of, still leaves him at a loss for words. That morning he'd read a newspaper column by James J. Kilpatrick, in which the syndicated writer posed a "hard question" about AIDS: "What's the big deal?"
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NEWS
June 13, 1988 | BOB SIPCHEN, Times Staff Writer
Paul Monette sat on the terrace of his hillside home, pondering the Big Questions: Life and Death. Love and Hate. Life has taught Monette a lot about love and death lately. But the subject of hatred, which he seems to be encountering more of, still leaves him at a loss for words. That morning he'd read a newspaper column by James J. Kilpatrick, in which the syndicated writer posed a "hard question" about AIDS: "What's the big deal?"
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BOOKS
March 4, 1990 | CHARLES SOLOMON
In this often moving chronicle, Paul Monette describes the 19-month battle his lover, Roger Horwitz, waged against AIDS. A deeply felt account of love and sorrow, "Borrowed Time" recounts how the two men strove to preserve the life they shared, despite Horwitz's inevitable decline. The luxuriousness of that life often undercuts the story: Monette and Horwitz had wealth and connections that enabled them to obtain comforts and experimental treatments not available to other patients.
NEWS
May 24, 1987 | LYNN SIMROSS, Times Staff Writer
The statistics about acquired immune deficiency syndrome are easily available: 20,557 Americans have died, nearly 2,000 of those in Los Angeles County. By 1991, there will be 270,000 cases of AIDS. Nationally, health-care costs for AIDS patients have been estimated at $100 million so far; by 1991, they are expected to reach $8 billion. But the names of its victims often are not so accessible, such is the stigma of the disease.
NEWS
March 23, 1989 | JEANNINE STEIN, Times Staff Writer
A small gathering of the literary community provided a powerful evening at the first Words Project for AIDS awards dinner. The 8-month-old organization gave awards to writers for their outstanding works on the subject of AIDS and raised money for the human-service programs of AIDS Project Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1995 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Paul Monette, whose written works include an autobiography that traced his tortuous path from the stigmas of homosexuality and a memoir detailing the agonizing AIDS death of his lover--both of which brought him national honors--has died of the disease that dominated his life and his work for more than a decade. Monette, believed to be the first AIDS patient to ever win a National Book Award, was 49.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1992 | AL MARTINEZ
I keep thinking about Paul Monette. I think about him because he's probably the most eloquent writer I know, a man whose prose soars with the lyrical freedom of poetry. And I think about him because he has AIDS. What brought him to mind recently was the announcement by Magic Johnson that he was HIV positive and was leaving the Lakers. Every sportswriter and sportscaster and sports fan in town, hell in the world , wept bitterly over such a fate to befall such a man . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1994 | AL MARTINEZ
Paul Monette's garden wears a winter face, with the leaves of a Chinese elm tree scattered about the patio and the bloomless rhododendron bushes oddly lackluster beneath an overcast December sky. Only a brilliantly red poinsettia, placed carefully in the center of a small table, adds a flash of color to the small back yard, but that's an intrusion. Hothouse plants don't belong here.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1995 | AL MARTINEZ
The trail through Temescal Gateway Park is tree-shaded and cool, winding past a stream that splashes over rocks and curves around tall reeds. Feathery ceanothus bushes dust the surrounding hillsides with pale blues and shades of muted white, and the buds of the sycamores struggle to burst into life on a day that hints of spring.
BOOKS
February 19, 1995 | ROBERT DAWIDOFF, Robert Dawidoff is a professor of history at the Claremont Graduate School
Paul Monette died last week after a valiant struggle with AIDS. He will be remembered by the reading and writing public for changing the way we thought about AIDS and about being gay and lesbian. He will also be remembered as a courageous writer who took heart from his talent and redeemed catastrophe in the way that artists can. For from Monette's writing we learn that the worst that life can bring can be transformed into lasting writing, full of feeling and experience and wisdom.
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