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Roger J Stone

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NEWS
September 11, 1988 | BOB DROGIN, Times Staff Writer
Firing another broadside Saturday, Democratic presidential nominee Michael S. Dukakis stepped up charges that Vice President George Bush relies on top advisers who were "paid agents" of Bahamanian officials suspected of drug profiteering. Dukakis tried to turn the tables on Republicans who he said had questioned his patriotism in recent weeks. "My staff will not have divided loyalties," the Massachusetts governor said.
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NEWS
September 11, 1988 | BOB DROGIN, Times Staff Writer
Firing another broadside Saturday, Democratic presidential nominee Michael S. Dukakis stepped up charges that Vice President George Bush relies on top advisers who were "paid agents" of Bahamanian officials suspected of drug profiteering. Dukakis tried to turn the tables on Republicans who he said had questioned his patriotism in recent weeks. "My staff will not have divided loyalties," the Massachusetts governor said.
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NEWS
September 8, 1988 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL, Times Staff Writer
A firm operated by top campaign aides to Vice President George Bush was hired in 1985 to lobby the Reagan Administration and Congress on behalf of Bahamas Prime Minister Lynden O. Pindling, then under fire over allegations of corruption and drug trafficking, a document obtained by The Times shows. The prominent Washington public relations firm of Black, Manafort, Stone & Kelly Inc.
NEWS
August 19, 1992 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Home, marriage, kids, a dog or two--the hazy, feel-good terrain of family values--has emerged as a key theme at this week's Republican National Convention, with Bush-Quayle campaign forces struggling to win back turf that Republicans controlled with ease in the 1980s. President Bush had barely arrived here before declaring that families should be "a lot more like the Waltons and a lot less like the Simpsons."
OPINION
August 5, 1990 | Ronald Brownstein, Ronald Brownstein is a national political correspondent for The Times
The only group in Washington more concerned than abortion-rights activists about President George Bush's nomination of David H. Souter to the Supreme Court are the people who make their living electing Republicans to office. Seared by the furor over last year's Webster decision, which merely gave states additional latitude to regulate abortion, few ranking Republican operatives still want the Supreme Court to overturn Roe vs. Wade, the landmark decision guaranteeing a woman's right to abortion.
OPINION
April 19, 1987 | William Schneider, William Schneider is a contributing editor to Opinion.
"Who's doing you in 1988?" is the question put to political candidates these days. It doesn't refer to hairdressers, but to the less dignified art of campaign consulting. With both party nominations wide open, 1988 will be a bonanza year for political consultants. Supposedly, consultants are competing with each other to sign up the hot candidates. In reality, candidates compete with each other to sign up the hot consultants. Political consulting is mostly a matter of reputation.
NEWS
April 11, 1995 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
When Sen. Phil Gramm of Texas began assembling his 1996 presidential campaign organization in New Hampshire, one of the first people he signed up was a Concord lawyer named Al Rubega. Rubega is not a prominent party leader. He doesn't hold an elected office, and he isn't an accomplished fund-raiser. But he is the president of Gun Owners of New Hampshire, and a board member of the National Rifle Assn.--perhaps the best organized conservative group in the state.
NEWS
November 20, 1991 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the last four years, David and Alfreda Belton have been working toward the American Dream. Married in 1987, the Beltons--who together earn about $80,000 a year--now live in a spacious three-bedroom, art-laden home in one of this area's poshest suburbs. Their 2-year-old son, Cameron, attends a private day-care facility. And they have two cars. "I can't complain," David Belton says. "I want to do better in the future, but right now I'm where I want to be."
MAGAZINE
July 3, 1988 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, Ronald Brownstein, a contributing editor of this magazine, is the West Coast correspondent and former White House correspondent for the National Journal. He is writing a book about the relationship between Hollywood and politics.
FOR SIX YEARS, Gov. George Deukmejian has successfully run a state bigger than most nations. But to the po litical elite of his own country, he couldn't be much less visible than if he were the mayor of California's insular state capital.
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