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Roger Kahn

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NEWS
September 22, 2000 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In "The Head Game," veteran baseball writer Roger Kahn takes us on an agreeable ramble through the history of baseball as seen from the point of view of its brainiest players, the pitchers. Kahn took the book's title, "Head Game," from a 1990 conversation with pitcher Clem Labine, who played for the Brooklyn Dodgers and Pittsburgh Pirates. "In a single phrase," Kahn writes, "Labine had summed up the essential core of baseball magic.
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NEWS
April 11, 2013 | By Patt Morrison
The integration of Major League Baseball, so heroically carried by Jackie Robinson and ingeniously engineered by Branch Rickey, occupied one spring and summer season in 1947. The boys of summer occupied the baseball seasons of the early 1950s, the boys being the stellar lineup of Brooklyn Dodgers who would win the World Series in 1955. Among them was pitcher Carl Erskine, a teammate of Robinson's, whom I interviewed for my column . “The Boys of Summer” is the title of Roger Kahn's seminal, beloved baseball book, the one he wrote 20 years after spending the long golden seasons with the team.
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SPORTS
March 18, 1989
Roger Kahn ought to go after the guy who wrote the Al Campanis column under his name in the March 14 paper. The writer is obviously an imposter, because the real Roger Kahn, the one who wrote "The Boys of Summer," the one with wit and whimsy, would never write such self-serving nonsense. If Kahn were really as defensive as this guy sounds, nobody would blame Tom Lasorda for giving him the cold shoulder. Why would a person seek to justify himself two years later? Was that his last great claim to fame?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2012 | By Jon Thurber, Los Angeles Times
At the outset, let it be noted that this book is for the faithful, those who bleed blue, who stay at the game until the last out (whatever the inning) and who don't think the day is complete at home until Uncle Vinny signs off with a cheery "good-night everybody. " "Dodgers From Coast to Coast: The Official Visual History of the Dodgers" is not an all-encompassing history, however, and the tone is far from objective. It has some wonderful bits of history and some glaring omissions.
NEWS
April 11, 2013 | By Patt Morrison
The integration of Major League Baseball, so heroically carried by Jackie Robinson and ingeniously engineered by Branch Rickey, occupied one spring and summer season in 1947. The boys of summer occupied the baseball seasons of the early 1950s, the boys being the stellar lineup of Brooklyn Dodgers who would win the World Series in 1955. Among them was pitcher Carl Erskine, a teammate of Robinson's, whom I interviewed for my column . “The Boys of Summer” is the title of Roger Kahn's seminal, beloved baseball book, the one he wrote 20 years after spending the long golden seasons with the team.
BOOKS
January 23, 1994 | DICK RORABACK
THE ERA, 1947-1957: When the Yankees, the Giants and the Dodgers Ruled the World by Roger Kahn (Ticknor & Fields: $22.95; 372 pp.) I was there, and he has it just right. New York was the capital of the universe, "a cosmic town." Its kings were Willie, Mickey and the Duke, "speed, power and grace," monarchs of all they surveyed from deepest center field. Jackie introduced the era, leading the league in everything but hotel reservations.
SPORTS
September 19, 2000 | LARRY STEWART
What: "The Head Game" Author: Roger Kahn Publisher: Harcourt Price: $25 One of the most dramatic moments in sports is the battle between a pitcher and a hitter when a game, a pennant or the World Series is on the line. Roger Kahn, whose 16 books include "The Boys of Summer," examines this aspect of baseball in a readable 310-page book, mainly through interviews with scores of pitchers. Kahn has the advantage of being able to personalize many of the stories because of his firsthand experiences.
SPORTS
April 24, 2007 | Bill Dwyre
The boy who wrote "The Boys of Summer" will be 80 on Halloween. At this stage of his life, the trick for Roger Kahn is to treat himself to writing projects that are comfortable and not consuming. "I'm a consultant now," he says, from his home in Stone Ridge, N.Y. "Best job in the world, a consultant." He is a frequent public speaker, is working on several screenplays and continues to write and make appearances in connection with the 21 books he has written.
SPORTS
April 12, 2003 | From Associated Press
The baseball Hall of Fame's decision to cancel a celebration for the movie "Bull Durham" has resulted in another cancellation. Author Roger Kahn, whose "Boys of Summer" is considered among the best baseball books ever, has called off his August appearance to speak at the Hall in protest. Kahn was to speak about his new book "October Men" about the 1978 New York Yankees team that won the World Series.
SPORTS
June 22, 1998 | BILL DWYRE, TIMES SPORTS EDITOR
Two years before their paths were to cross on the "Nightline" program that has forever been engraved in the lore of major league baseball, Al Campanis and Roger Kahn had a moment in time that left Kahn forever grateful. And so it was with a sense of sadness, as well as irony, that the world-famous author of "The Boys of Summer" talked about Campanis, who died Sunday, at the age of 81. On Father's Day.
SPORTS
April 24, 2007 | Bill Dwyre
The boy who wrote "The Boys of Summer" will be 80 on Halloween. At this stage of his life, the trick for Roger Kahn is to treat himself to writing projects that are comfortable and not consuming. "I'm a consultant now," he says, from his home in Stone Ridge, N.Y. "Best job in the world, a consultant." He is a frequent public speaker, is working on several screenplays and continues to write and make appearances in connection with the 21 books he has written.
SPORTS
January 10, 2004
For the last 14 years, Pete Rose has told us he never bet on baseball. The reason was because he wanted to get into the Hall of Fame and get a job in baseball. Now he tells us he lied, because he wants to get reinstated in baseball and to get into the Hall. And he has shown no remorse and is trying to implicate others into his web of deceit. You know, I think I kind of liked Pete better when he was a liar. Ralph S. Brax Lancaster When my father would play catch with me in the early '70s, he would tell me to play like Pete Rose.
BOOKS
May 18, 2003 | Anthony Day, Anthony Day is a contributing writer to Book Review.
Now that the days are getting longer, thoughts in America turn to baseball. Spring fever breeds desire, and desire summons up nostalgia for baseball seasons long gone and teams that long ago changed their home bases. Will Brooklyn and its fans ever give up mourning their lost Dodgers?
SPORTS
April 12, 2003 | From Associated Press
The baseball Hall of Fame's decision to cancel a celebration for the movie "Bull Durham" has resulted in another cancellation. Author Roger Kahn, whose "Boys of Summer" is considered among the best baseball books ever, has called off his August appearance to speak at the Hall in protest. Kahn was to speak about his new book "October Men" about the 1978 New York Yankees team that won the World Series.
NEWS
September 22, 2000 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In "The Head Game," veteran baseball writer Roger Kahn takes us on an agreeable ramble through the history of baseball as seen from the point of view of its brainiest players, the pitchers. Kahn took the book's title, "Head Game," from a 1990 conversation with pitcher Clem Labine, who played for the Brooklyn Dodgers and Pittsburgh Pirates. "In a single phrase," Kahn writes, "Labine had summed up the essential core of baseball magic.
SPORTS
September 19, 2000 | LARRY STEWART
What: "The Head Game" Author: Roger Kahn Publisher: Harcourt Price: $25 One of the most dramatic moments in sports is the battle between a pitcher and a hitter when a game, a pennant or the World Series is on the line. Roger Kahn, whose 16 books include "The Boys of Summer," examines this aspect of baseball in a readable 310-page book, mainly through interviews with scores of pitchers. Kahn has the advantage of being able to personalize many of the stories because of his firsthand experiences.
SPORTS
August 29, 1989 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
Last spring, author Roger Kahn was wrapping up a book on Pete Rose. Or, he thought he was. One morning in the study of his home in Croton-On-Hudson, N.Y., he spotted a provocative item in the New York Times. "A little item caught my eye, in one of the sports columns," he said. "It was a mum's-the-word-type item, hinting that the (baseball) commissioner's office was looking into alleged Rose gambling activities.
BOOKS
November 7, 1999 | STEVEN G. KELLMAN, Steven G. Kellman is the author of "The Self-Begetting Novel" and co-editor of "Leslie Fiedler and American Culture." He is an Ashbel Smith Professor of Comparative Literature at the University of Texas at San Antonio
"Ican lick any son of a bitch in the house," gloated John L. Sullivan, America's last bare-knuckles champion. No other athlete can match the barroom boast of a heavyweight boxer. Success in football, hockey or shotput certainly demands pluck, luck and talent but, lacking Sullivan's primitive proof of elemental mastery over another human being in one-on-one combat, a star in any sport other than boxing seems a mere technician.
SPORTS
June 22, 1998 | BILL DWYRE, TIMES SPORTS EDITOR
Two years before their paths were to cross on the "Nightline" program that has forever been engraved in the lore of major league baseball, Al Campanis and Roger Kahn had a moment in time that left Kahn forever grateful. And so it was with a sense of sadness, as well as irony, that the world-famous author of "The Boys of Summer" talked about Campanis, who died Sunday, at the age of 81. On Father's Day.
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