Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRoger Keating
IN THE NEWS

Roger Keating

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
March 16, 2007 | James S. Granelli, Times Staff Writer
Time Warner Cable Inc. forced out its chief cable guy in Southern California on Wednesday, but you may not want to throw that help number away just yet. Roger Keating, head of Time Warner's regional office since 2003, was done in by an avalanche of complaints about Internet and e-mail outages, TV channel lineup changes and pressure to sign up for digital service. Customers were most annoyed by maddeningly long -- and sometimes futile -- waits to reach a human by phone.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
March 16, 2007 | James S. Granelli, Times Staff Writer
Time Warner Cable Inc. forced out its chief cable guy in Southern California on Wednesday, but you may not want to throw that help number away just yet. Roger Keating, head of Time Warner's regional office since 2003, was done in by an avalanche of complaints about Internet and e-mail outages, TV channel lineup changes and pressure to sign up for digital service. Customers were most annoyed by maddeningly long -- and sometimes futile -- waits to reach a human by phone.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
May 24, 2005 | Sallie Hofmeister, Times Staff Writer
Roger Keating, who will become head of Southern California's largest cable system if Time Warner Inc.'s proposed acquisition of Adelphia Communications Corp. is completed, promised Monday that the transaction would mean improved customer service and more advanced offerings throughout the region.
BUSINESS
May 24, 2005 | Sallie Hofmeister, Times Staff Writer
Roger Keating, who will become head of Southern California's largest cable system if Time Warner Inc.'s proposed acquisition of Adelphia Communications Corp. is completed, promised Monday that the transaction would mean improved customer service and more advanced offerings throughout the region.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2008 | Andrea Chang, Times Staff Writer
Stephen Pagano, brought in a year ago to help Time Warner Cable Inc. work through a botched effort to combine the operations of three Southern California cable systems, was promoted to a new position overseeing the cable TV giant's Western region. Pagano, a 26-year veteran of Time Warner, was named executive vice president for a region covering 2.5 million customers in Los Angeles, San Diego and Hawaii.
BUSINESS
May 3, 2007 | James S. Granelli, Times Staff Writer
Time Warner Cable Inc. continued to lose pay-TV customers in Los Angeles and Dallas during the first quarter as it struggled to recover from botched efforts to integrate other cable systems it acquired last summer. But sales gains in so-called triple-play packages which include TV, Internet and phone service, helped the nation's second-largest cable TV company post double-digit increases in revenue and profit.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2012 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
A consortium of television station group owners is launching a new technology that seeks to harness the second screen in the living room: the tablet or laptop computer. These broadcasters will begin offering online content to supplement shows on TV, using software developed by social media start-up ConnecTV. An Apple Inc. iPad application automatically synchronizes the device with whatever program a viewer is watching, then delivers related information. Someone watching an NBA Finals game, for example, could review statistics about former L.A. Lakers point guard Derek Fisher, who now plays for the Oklahoma City Thunder.
BUSINESS
July 14, 2006 | Jim Puzzanghera and James S. Granelli, Times Staff Writers
The cable TV market in Los Angeles is poised for a radical makeover after federal regulators Thursday approved the sale of Adelphia Communications Corp. to Time Warner Inc. and Comcast Corp. Time Warner will become Southern California's largest cable TV provider under the deal, acquiring Adelphia's 1.2 million subscribers in the region along with 500,000 from Comcast in a complicated swap of assets arising from Adelphia's collapse into bankruptcy in 2002 amid an accounting scandal.
NEWS
July 9, 1986 | PETER BAKER, Times Staff Writer
Aliens have invaded California, and in what's left of Fresno the Marines are desperately trying to fend off the attack. The situation appears hopeless; the National Guard and local SWAT teams have already been slaughtered, much of the heavy weaponry is gone and the city is in ruins. The battle has deteriorated into a street-by-street guerrilla war, with the enemy lurking behind every corner as the Marines try to keep them from the crucial grain supply.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|