Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRoger Kennedy
IN THE NEWS

Roger Kennedy

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2011 | By Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times
One day deep in the administration of George W. Bush — a time of tumult among environmentalists and conservationists — Roger Kennedy found himself shaking his head and sighing. The Endangered Species Act was in the cross hairs of a Republican Congress and his beloved National Park Service, which Kennedy directed from 1993 to 1997, was under assault. Kennedy was disgusted by the partisan bickering. When had stewardship of the environment become a political football, he asked, posing a rhetorical question to a reporter.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2011 | By Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times
One day deep in the administration of George W. Bush — a time of tumult among environmentalists and conservationists — Roger Kennedy found himself shaking his head and sighing. The Endangered Species Act was in the cross hairs of a Republican Congress and his beloved National Park Service, which Kennedy directed from 1993 to 1997, was under assault. Kennedy was disgusted by the partisan bickering. When had stewardship of the environment become a political football, he asked, posing a rhetorical question to a reporter.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 16, 1993 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
His Smokey Bear hat cocked at a raffish angle, Roger Kennedy, the newly appointed National Park Service director, was telling a network television audience he thought people were willing to pay more to support the parks. "I am sure that the American people are willing to be taxed, and taxed to support the national parks," Kennedy told CBS News last month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2006 | Tim Reiterman, Times Staff Writer
When 14 firefighters died in a wind-fanned inferno near Glenwood Springs, Colo., in 1994, Roger G. Kennedy was struck by the senselessness of the tragedy. "They were not fighting to protect an ecosystem or even a railroad or a highway," he recalled. "Those people went to their death protecting a real estate development."
NEWS
May 22, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Clinton Administration has selected historian and museum director Roger Kennedy to head the National Park Service. The White House announced that President Clinton picked Kennedy, 66, director of the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History, as director of the nation's 367 parks, national monuments and historic areas. Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt initially offered the job to Tom Brokaw, anchorman of the "NBC Nightly News," and to former EPA Administrator William K.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2006 | Tim Reiterman, Times Staff Writer
When 14 firefighters died in a wind-fanned inferno near Glenwood Springs, Colo., in 1994, Roger G. Kennedy was struck by the senselessness of the tragedy. "They were not fighting to protect an ecosystem or even a railroad or a highway," he recalled. "Those people went to their death protecting a real estate development."
NEWS
November 9, 1994 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At odd moments, Roger Kennedy's "Hidden Cities" seems almost like a science-fiction novel--we find ourselves in a parallel universe in which North America is populated by lost tribes whose vast sacred architecture rivals that of the Mayas or the Egyptians. But the landscape that Kennedy describes so startlingly is a very real place, and the men and women who lived upon it include some of the most familiar figures of American history.
NEWS
January 14, 1997 | Reuters
The director of the National Park Service plans to resign as soon as a replacement is ready to take the post, the Interior Department said Monday. Roger Kennedy, 70, appointed in 1993, said he had planned to retire after four years in the job overseeing 374 parks.
NEWS
April 26, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Visitors to the nation's capital might have to dodge scaffolding, construction crews and jackhammers as they tour historic sites for the next several summers. The Jefferson and Lincoln memorials are under restoration, and surveying work is getting underway on the Washington Monument. "These places belong to us, so when there's work being done on them all the time, hooray for us!" said Roger G. Kennedy, director of the National Park Service.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1990 | From The Washington Post
Pressured by rising costs and budget cuts, the Smithsonian Institution is considering closing a "substantial" number of museum galleries as one possible cost-cutting measure, according to Smithsonian officials. "Right now we're talking more about what might happen rather than what is happening," Smithsonian spokeswoman Madeleine Jacobs said today.
NEWS
November 9, 1994 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At odd moments, Roger Kennedy's "Hidden Cities" seems almost like a science-fiction novel--we find ourselves in a parallel universe in which North America is populated by lost tribes whose vast sacred architecture rivals that of the Mayas or the Egyptians. But the landscape that Kennedy describes so startlingly is a very real place, and the men and women who lived upon it include some of the most familiar figures of American history.
NEWS
August 16, 1993 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
His Smokey Bear hat cocked at a raffish angle, Roger Kennedy, the newly appointed National Park Service director, was telling a network television audience he thought people were willing to pay more to support the parks. "I am sure that the American people are willing to be taxed, and taxed to support the national parks," Kennedy told CBS News last month.
NEWS
May 22, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Clinton Administration has selected historian and museum director Roger Kennedy to head the National Park Service. The White House announced that President Clinton picked Kennedy, 66, director of the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History, as director of the nation's 367 parks, national monuments and historic areas. Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt initially offered the job to Tom Brokaw, anchorman of the "NBC Nightly News," and to former EPA Administrator William K.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1987
I was a juror in the trial of Pamela Weston, accused of prostitution in a police sting operation (Oct. 3). We jurors found the defendant guilty, given the law and the evidence as we saw it. But many of us are upset about peripheral issues in the case. The decision to mount an operation of this scope, creating a full "bachelor party" setup involving 16 police detectives from three city departments, plus considerable backup and other expense, just to net two girls in a dance performance that included a minor sex act is just plain dumb.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|