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Roger L Perry

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NEWS
December 24, 1993 | From a Times Staff Writer
Questions were raised Thursday about the credibility of two Arkansas state troopers who have accused President Clinton of using them to facilitate and conceal extramarital affairs while he was governor of Arkansas. The charges, which were made by a Little Rock, Ark., lawyer, raised questions about the truthfulness of Troopers Larry G. Patterson and Roger L. Perry, two of the four former Clinton bodyguards who have made accusations against the President.
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NEWS
January 22, 1994 | From a Times Staff Writer
There will be no criminal investigation of two Arkansas state troopers who last month alleged that they helped then-Gov. Bill Clinton conceal his extramarital affairs and that when he became President offered federal jobs to discourage them from speaking out. Arkansas State Police Director Tommy L. Goodwin said reports of such an investigation published Jan. 13 by the Associated Press and the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette newspaper were erroneous. The AP account also appeared in The Times.
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NEWS
December 26, 1993 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL and DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Credibility has become the battleground after a weeklong furor over allegations that President Clinton, as governor of Arkansas, used state troopers to conceal and carry out extramarital affairs and then offered federal jobs to discourage the troopers from speaking out. Those charges by some of Clinton's former Arkansas bodyguards were met with strong denunciations by the President. First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton also criticized the allegations of infidelity.
NEWS
January 13, 1994 | From Associated Press
The Arkansas State Police will investigate two troopers who accused President Clinton of misusing his security detail while serving as governor, the agency's director said Wednesday. However, police will not investigate the allegations made by the troopers, including claims that Clinton used his bodyguards to help arrange extramarital trysts. Col.
NEWS
December 21, 1993 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL and DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Four Arkansas state troopers have revived allegations and offered new details about extramarital affairs that caused a crisis in Bill Clinton's campaign for the presidency. Two of the troopers say that Clinton, as President, sought to discourage them from speaking out by offering them federal jobs.
NEWS
January 13, 1994 | From Associated Press
The Arkansas State Police will investigate two troopers who accused President Clinton of misusing his security detail while serving as governor, the agency's director said Wednesday. However, police will not investigate the allegations made by the troopers, including claims that Clinton used his bodyguards to help arrange extramarital trysts. Col.
NEWS
January 22, 1994 | From a Times Staff Writer
There will be no criminal investigation of two Arkansas state troopers who last month alleged that they helped then-Gov. Bill Clinton conceal his extramarital affairs and that when he became President offered federal jobs to discourage them from speaking out. Arkansas State Police Director Tommy L. Goodwin said reports of such an investigation published Jan. 13 by the Associated Press and the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette newspaper were erroneous. The AP account also appeared in The Times.
NEWS
December 30, 1993 | From Associated Press
A lawyer for two Arkansas troopers who allege that they helped arrange sexual trysts for Bill Clinton as governor apologized Wednesday for the "public pain" the story caused the President. In a letter to Clinton, Little Rock attorney Cliff Jackson said he hoped that the public airing of the allegations would bring about the "best possible future for you and our country." "I feel for your pain and that of your family," Jackson wrote in the letter distributed to news media.
NEWS
December 27, 1993 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Clinton Administration Cabinet official lashed out at the news media Sunday for what he described as "search and destroy" behavior in its coverage of alleged improprieties in President Clinton's personal life while he was governor of Arkansas. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Henry G.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2010 | By Tom Hamburger and Andrew Zajac
Massey Energy Co. has been cited for repeated mine safety violations in recent years, racking up hundreds of penalties at the Upper Big Branch mine, where an explosion Monday killed at least 25 workers. Federal prosecutors also have brought two criminal complaints for violation of worker protection rules at other mines run by the company, the nation's sixth-biggest coal-mining firm. Massey officials say they have an above-average safety record and have received awards for their performance at individual mines.
NEWS
December 26, 1993 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL and DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Credibility has become the battleground after a weeklong furor over allegations that President Clinton, as governor of Arkansas, used state troopers to conceal and carry out extramarital affairs and then offered federal jobs to discourage the troopers from speaking out. Those charges by some of Clinton's former Arkansas bodyguards were met with strong denunciations by the President. First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton also criticized the allegations of infidelity.
NEWS
December 24, 1993 | From a Times Staff Writer
Questions were raised Thursday about the credibility of two Arkansas state troopers who have accused President Clinton of using them to facilitate and conceal extramarital affairs while he was governor of Arkansas. The charges, which were made by a Little Rock, Ark., lawyer, raised questions about the truthfulness of Troopers Larry G. Patterson and Roger L. Perry, two of the four former Clinton bodyguards who have made accusations against the President.
NEWS
December 21, 1993 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL and DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Four Arkansas state troopers have revived allegations and offered new details about extramarital affairs that caused a crisis in Bill Clinton's campaign for the presidency. Two of the troopers say that Clinton, as President, sought to discourage them from speaking out by offering them federal jobs.
NEWS
December 22, 1993 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hillary Rodham Clinton assailed new allegations of her husband's marital infidelity as outrageous Tuesday and charged that they were motivated by hope of financial and political gain by enemies of the President. In year-end interviews with two wire services, the First Lady called accounts from two Arkansas state troopers about President Clinton's sexual activities before entering the White House "sad and unfortunate"--especially coming shortly before Christmas.
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