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Roger L Stevens

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NEWS
July 29, 1987
The Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts' board of trustees, after a yearlong search, named retiring Time Inc. executive Ralph P. Davidson as president and chief executive officer. Chairman Roger L. Stevens, 77, who led the fund raising to build the Washington center and has guided its programming since it opened in 1971, will hold the title of founder chairman. Davidson, 59, will quit as chairman of Time Inc.'s executive board to join the center Feb. 1, 1988.
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NEWS
February 4, 1998 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roger L. Stevens, a Realtor who bought and sold the Empire State Building, the Broadway angel who produced the classic musical "West Side Story," and the man appointed by President John F. Kennedy to create a national cultural center, has died. He was 87. Stevens, who from 1961 to 1988 headed what became the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, died of pneumonia Monday night at Georgetown University Medical Center.
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NEWS
April 16, 1993 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the 1993 Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival gets underway Sunday in Washington, six top college productions will be presented and a bevy of theater luminaries will be on hand to celebrate the festival's 25th anniversary. Roger L. Stevens, the founding chairman of Kennedy Center who started the festival in 1969, will open the gathering with actors Jason Robards Jr.
NEWS
April 16, 1993 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the 1993 Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival gets underway Sunday in Washington, six top college productions will be presented and a bevy of theater luminaries will be on hand to celebrate the festival's 25th anniversary. Roger L. Stevens, the founding chairman of Kennedy Center who started the festival in 1969, will open the gathering with actors Jason Robards Jr.
NEWS
February 4, 1998 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roger L. Stevens, a Realtor who bought and sold the Empire State Building, the Broadway angel who produced the classic musical "West Side Story," and the man appointed by President John F. Kennedy to create a national cultural center, has died. He was 87. Stevens, who from 1961 to 1988 headed what became the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, died of pneumonia Monday night at Georgetown University Medical Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1986 | JOE BROWN, Washington Post
Playwright Larry Kramer caused more "Heart" trouble over the weekend. Kramer, outspoken author of the AIDS drama "The Normal Heart," Friday charged that politics caused the Kennedy Center to back off from a possible fall production of the play. In January, Kramer caused "Heart" murmurs when he pulled the plug on the Studio Theater's projected area premiere of the play because he couldn't have the director he wanted.
NEWS
August 10, 1988 | SHIRLEY MARLOW
Jimmy Carter almost made it to the top in Africa. Then the former President turned back not far from the summit of Africa's highest mountain, an official of Tanzania's Mt. Kilimanjaro National Park said. "Carter descended this morning after climbing to Gilman's Point, which is 18,647 feet high," 693 feet short of Uhuru peak, the unidentified park official said. He did not say why the 63-year-old Carter failed to reach the 19,340-foot summit of Mt. Kilimanjaro.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1986 | CLARKE TAYLOR
A fund to assist in the production of new American plays at theaters around the country has been established by the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington. "The key to a thriving American theater is an environment that fosters the development of new plays and playwrights, but for many years the financial obstacles to creating such an environment have been very discouraging," said Kennedy Center chairman Roger L. Stevens.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1993 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The WASP may just be an endangered species. But not in its natural habitat, and certainly not in the plays of A.R. Gurney, the species' most able chronicler. * In Gurney's "Love Letters," at the Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts, the playwright zeros in on two fairly typical WASP types: Andrew Makepeace Ladd III and Melissa Gardner.
NEWS
July 29, 1987
The Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts' board of trustees, after a yearlong search, named retiring Time Inc. executive Ralph P. Davidson as president and chief executive officer. Chairman Roger L. Stevens, 77, who led the fund raising to build the Washington center and has guided its programming since it opened in 1971, will hold the title of founder chairman. Davidson, 59, will quit as chairman of Time Inc.'s executive board to join the center Feb. 1, 1988.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1986 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, Times Staff Writer
Four major Los Angeles ethnic arts organizations--the Japanese American Cultural and Community Center, the California Afro-American Museum, the Craft and Folk Art Museum and the Plaza de la Raza--are ready to launch an Arts Consortium next month. The announcement was made Thursday at a meeting of the President's Committee on the Arts and Humanities.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1992 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
One "Caine Mutiny Court Martial" is enough court martial drama for a lifetime, since the decks are always loaded and the outcome stacked. Besides, all that military rectitude is bad for the nerves. Those attributes still pertain in Aaron Sorkin's "A Few Good Men," which opened Tuesday at the Wilshire Theatre. The decks are loaded and the outcome stacked. The sounding off never stops and the rectitude is abundant.
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