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Roger Lafontant

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NEWS
October 14, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
A feared former security official in the Haitian dictatorship of Jean-Claude Duvalier made a bold public appearance at a convention of 2,000 loyalists of the ousted regime in Port-au-Prince. Flanked by military men, Roger Lafontant, a former interior minister and the reputed head of the notorious Tontons Macoutes secret police created by the Duvalier family, was cheered at the convention, which is expected to nominate a presidential candidate today.
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NEWS
July 31, 1991 | From Associated Press
The former head of the Duvalier family's brutal private militia was convicted Tuesday of leading a coup attempt and was sentenced to life in prison at hard labor. Many Haitians viewed the trial of Roger Lafontant, a doctor who became one of the ousted dictatorship's most feared henchmen, as a symbol of the final demise of Duvalier rule.
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NEWS
January 28, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rumors of a plot to free the jailed leader of a Jan. 6 coup attempt provoked street violence that left at least 10 people dead and 14 wounded, according to independent radio reports. The dead included four reputed agents of the ousted Duvalier family dictatorship lynched by a mob and six protesters shot by soldiers, the reports said.
NEWS
July 30, 1991 | From Reuters
Sailors at the Haitian capital's main naval base mutinied and seized senior officers Monday, accusing them of plotting a coup to overthrow President Jean-Bertrand Aristide. A spokesman for the mutineers told a local radio station that they arrested their commanding officers to ensure that the trial of Roger Lafontant, a former interior minister and accused coup leader, would start that day, as scheduled.
NEWS
July 31, 1991 | From Associated Press
The former head of the Duvalier family's brutal private militia was convicted Tuesday of leading a coup attempt and was sentenced to life in prison at hard labor. Many Haitians viewed the trial of Roger Lafontant, a doctor who became one of the ousted dictatorship's most feared henchmen, as a symbol of the final demise of Duvalier rule.
NEWS
July 30, 1991 | From Reuters
Sailors at the Haitian capital's main naval base mutinied and seized senior officers Monday, accusing them of plotting a coup to overthrow President Jean-Bertrand Aristide. A spokesman for the mutineers told a local radio station that they arrested their commanding officers to ensure that the trial of Roger Lafontant, a former interior minister and accused coup leader, would start that day, as scheduled.
NEWS
January 9, 1991 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stained by the ashes of burned buildings, tires and bodies, Haiti's capital city slowly returned to normal Tuesday after mobs rampaged, demolishing even church properties, after an attempted coup d'etat. The death toll exceeded 50, according to an official who counted 44 burned and mutilated bodies in the city morgue alone.
NEWS
January 7, 1991 | From Reuters
Roger Lafontant, feared leader of a faction loyal to exiled dictator Jean-Claude Duvalier, claimed early today to have seized power in Haiti after a two-hour gun battle near the presidential palace. "I have assumed the presidency of the republic," Lafontant said in a one-sentence statement today on the state-run Radio Nacional. Provisional President Ertha Pascal-Trouillot, in a brief statement from the palace broadcast on the radio, said she was stepping down.
NEWS
January 8, 1991 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A short-lived attempt to seize power by the reputed chief torturer of the Duvalier regime was put down by the Haitian army Monday. The abortive coup d'etat by followers of Roger Lafontant touched off the worst mob rampages in Haiti's bloody recent history, leaving a reported 40 people dead, many of them lynched in rings of burning rubber tires. Most of the victims appeared to be followers of Lafontant, who was interior minister under dictator Jean-Claude (Baby Doc) Duvalier.
NEWS
October 21, 1990 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Graffiti artists using human excrement as their medium of political expression smeared the malodorous slogan "Worst is still to come" on the walls of four voter registration offices in Haiti earlier this month. "Next time we will use gasoline," added one piece of graffito. As the sloganeers suggested, Haiti's upcoming national elections, now scheduled for Dec. 16, may turn dirty.
NEWS
January 28, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rumors of a plot to free the jailed leader of a Jan. 6 coup attempt provoked street violence that left at least 10 people dead and 14 wounded, according to independent radio reports. The dead included four reputed agents of the ousted Duvalier family dictatorship lynched by a mob and six protesters shot by soldiers, the reports said.
NEWS
January 9, 1991 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stained by the ashes of burned buildings, tires and bodies, Haiti's capital city slowly returned to normal Tuesday after mobs rampaged, demolishing even church properties, after an attempted coup d'etat. The death toll exceeded 50, according to an official who counted 44 burned and mutilated bodies in the city morgue alone.
NEWS
January 8, 1991 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A short-lived attempt to seize power by the reputed chief torturer of the Duvalier regime was put down by the Haitian army Monday. The abortive coup d'etat by followers of Roger Lafontant touched off the worst mob rampages in Haiti's bloody recent history, leaving a reported 40 people dead, many of them lynched in rings of burning rubber tires. Most of the victims appeared to be followers of Lafontant, who was interior minister under dictator Jean-Claude (Baby Doc) Duvalier.
NEWS
January 7, 1991 | From Associated Press
Loyalist soldiers stormed the National Palace today and arrested a supporter of ousted dictator Jean-Claude Duvalier who had tried to overthrow the government. At least 34 people reportedly died in street violence during the coup attempt. State-run radio said 26 Haitians were killed in a shoot-out at the headquarters of the Union for National Reconciliation, the party headed by the coup leader, Roger Lafontant.
NEWS
January 7, 1991 | From Reuters
Roger Lafontant, feared leader of a faction loyal to exiled dictator Jean-Claude Duvalier, claimed early today to have seized power in Haiti after a two-hour gun battle near the presidential palace. "I have assumed the presidency of the republic," Lafontant said in a one-sentence statement today on the state-run Radio Nacional. Provisional President Ertha Pascal-Trouillot, in a brief statement from the palace broadcast on the radio, said she was stepping down.
NEWS
October 21, 1990 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Graffiti artists using human excrement as their medium of political expression smeared the malodorous slogan "Worst is still to come" on the walls of four voter registration offices in Haiti earlier this month. "Next time we will use gasoline," added one piece of graffito. As the sloganeers suggested, Haiti's upcoming national elections, now scheduled for Dec. 16, may turn dirty.
NEWS
January 7, 1991 | From Associated Press
Loyalist soldiers stormed the National Palace today and arrested a supporter of ousted dictator Jean-Claude Duvalier who had tried to overthrow the government. At least 34 people reportedly died in street violence during the coup attempt. State-run radio said 26 Haitians were killed in a shoot-out at the headquarters of the Union for National Reconciliation, the party headed by the coup leader, Roger Lafontant.
NEWS
September 12, 1985
Haiti's president-for-life, Jean-Claude Duvalier, has fired his powerful interior and security minister, the man most often blamed for repressive measures against government opponents. Duvalier announced on nationwide television that Roger Lafontant, once considered his most influential adviser, would be replaced by Francois Guillaume, ambassador to the Organization of American States. Duvalier also replaced his education and social affairs ministers.
NEWS
October 14, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
A feared former security official in the Haitian dictatorship of Jean-Claude Duvalier made a bold public appearance at a convention of 2,000 loyalists of the ousted regime in Port-au-Prince. Flanked by military men, Roger Lafontant, a former interior minister and the reputed head of the notorious Tontons Macoutes secret police created by the Duvalier family, was cheered at the convention, which is expected to nominate a presidential candidate today.
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