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SPORTS
May 3, 1985 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
The phone rang in Cam Gambolati's room at the Executive Inn West near Churchill Downs. Gambolati is the 35-year-old trainer of Spend A Buck, a 6-to-1 shot to win Saturday's Kentucky Derby. "Cammie?" the voice at the other end of the line said. Only close friends usually call Gambolati that. Yet the caller was a radio reporter from New York whom the trainer didn't know. She wanted to do a telephone interview with Gambolati the next day at 9 or 10 a.m.
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SPORTS
October 17, 1985
Silveyville is back, and Prince Spellbound could be on the way. Both of those horses, after earning enough money to rank fifth and sixth on the lifetime purse list of California-breds, were retired to stud. But Silveyville, a 7-year-old, ran Sunday at Santa Anita, for the first time since last December, and won at 6 1/2 furlongs on the turf. As for Prince Spellbound, his owner, Bill Pease of Gillette, Wyo.
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SPORTS
May 4, 1985 | ANDREW BEYER, The Washington Post
Brian Hurst is my kind of horse owner. He understands the nature of the game, and he knows how to deal with the press. Most owners and trainers take it personally when a writer says anything bad about their horse. You're safer saying something vicious about their mothers. When Roger Laurin was reading in the papers this winter that Chief's Crown looked sore or lame, he became hostile and withdrawn -- a typical response. But Hurst understands that racing is a game of opinions.
SPORTS
September 15, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Chief's Crown beat some of the best older horses in the nation in the $500,000 Marlboro Cup Saturday at Belmont Park in Elmont, N.Y., and the talk was of championships for the 3-year-old and vindication for his jockey, Don MacBeth. Chief's Crown, moving into contention on the turn and taking the lead with a quarter of a mile left, defeated Gate Dancer by a neck in 2:01 1/5 for the 1 miles and charged back into the 3-year-old championship picture--or more, in the eyes of trainer Roger Laurin.
SPORTS
March 31, 1985 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
The running of the 56th Flamingo Stakes at Hialeah was a race that ended with the taste of ashes, a lingering, hollow feeling that extended even to the people connected with Proud Truth, who was declared the winner after a lengthy stewards' inquiry. After the stewards reviewed multi-angled television reruns of the final 30 yards of the race for about 15 minutes Saturday and disqualified Chief's Crown in favor of Proud Truth, Roger Laurin bordered on apoplexy in the winner's circle.
SPORTS
October 17, 1985
Silveyville is back, and Prince Spellbound could be on the way. Both of those horses, after earning enough money to rank fifth and sixth on the lifetime purse list of California-breds, were retired to stud. But Silveyville, a 7-year-old, ran Sunday at Santa Anita, for the first time since last December, and won at 6 1/2 furlongs on the turf. As for Prince Spellbound, his owner, Bill Pease of Gillette, Wyo.
SPORTS
September 15, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Chief's Crown beat some of the best older horses in the nation in the $500,000 Marlboro Cup Saturday at Belmont Park in Elmont, N.Y., and the talk was of championships for the 3-year-old and vindication for his jockey, Don MacBeth. Chief's Crown, moving into contention on the turn and taking the lead with a quarter of a mile left, defeated Gate Dancer by a neck in 2:01 1/5 for the 1 miles and charged back into the 3-year-old championship picture--or more, in the eyes of trainer Roger Laurin.
SPORTS
March 3, 1985 | BILL CHRISTINE
Chief's Crown, last year's 2-year-old champion, made his first start as a 3-year-old in impressive fashion Saturday at Gulfstream Park, winning the $50,000 Swale Stakes by 3 lengths. There were only two other stakes winners--Creme Fraiche, who finished second, and Cherokee Fast, who was third--in the nine-horse field, but trainer Roger Laurin still was satisfied with Chief's Crown's first test since he won the Breeders' Cup Juvenile Stakes Nov. 10 at Hollywood Park.
SPORTS
April 25, 1985 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
Is there a Blue Grass Stakes jinx as far as the Kentucky Derby is concerned? If there is, Chief's Crown will be running into the face of it today when the favorite for the May 4 Derby faces only three opponents in the 61st edition of the Blue Grass at Keeneland.
SPORTS
April 2, 1985 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
Henryk de Kwiatkowski, still fuming over the way the stewards at Hialeah handled a disqualification in the furious three-horse finish in Saturday's Flamingo Stakes, said Monday night that he would file a formal protest with Florida racing authorities today. De Kwiatkowski's colt, Stephan's Odyssey, finished third in the $265,000 Flamingo, a neck behind Proud Truth, who finished second and was a length behind the winner, Chief's Crown.
SPORTS
May 4, 1985 | ANDREW BEYER, The Washington Post
Brian Hurst is my kind of horse owner. He understands the nature of the game, and he knows how to deal with the press. Most owners and trainers take it personally when a writer says anything bad about their horse. You're safer saying something vicious about their mothers. When Roger Laurin was reading in the papers this winter that Chief's Crown looked sore or lame, he became hostile and withdrawn -- a typical response. But Hurst understands that racing is a game of opinions.
SPORTS
May 3, 1985 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
The phone rang in Cam Gambolati's room at the Executive Inn West near Churchill Downs. Gambolati is the 35-year-old trainer of Spend A Buck, a 6-to-1 shot to win Saturday's Kentucky Derby. "Cammie?" the voice at the other end of the line said. Only close friends usually call Gambolati that. Yet the caller was a radio reporter from New York whom the trainer didn't know. She wanted to do a telephone interview with Gambolati the next day at 9 or 10 a.m.
SPORTS
March 31, 1985 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
The running of the 56th Flamingo Stakes at Hialeah was a race that ended with the taste of ashes, a lingering, hollow feeling that extended even to the people connected with Proud Truth, who was declared the winner after a lengthy stewards' inquiry. After the stewards reviewed multi-angled television reruns of the final 30 yards of the race for about 15 minutes Saturday and disqualified Chief's Crown in favor of Proud Truth, Roger Laurin bordered on apoplexy in the winner's circle.
SPORTS
May 18, 1985 | BILL CHRISTINE, Times Staff Writer
It has been raining for two days here, and it may rain some more today. The overcast skies are in character with today's running of the Preakness Stakes, a 109-year-old race whose future as the middle jewel in racing's Triple Crown series is currently being painted as cloudy and gray. Pimlico Race Course, host for the $545,700 Preakness and other than Saratoga the oldest race track in the United States, has taken more shots recently than nearby Ft.
SPORTS
April 21, 1985 | United Press International
Once considered the premier prep race for the Kentucky Derby, the winner of the Blue Grass Stakes has won the Run for the Roses only once since 1973. But last year's champion 2-year-old Chief's Crown, with Donald MacBeth aboard, will go to the post next Thursday in the $150,000-added Blue Grass at Keeneland looking much like the last horse to win both races--Spectacular Bid in 1979.
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