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BUSINESS
March 6, 1991 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 40 years in the advertising business, Paul Keye is starting over. Last month, Paul Keye left behind the rubble of the once-dynamic agency he co-founded, Keye/Donna/Pearlstein, to become chairman of the newly opened Los Angeles ad firm Livingston & Keye. Keye, 61, created the state's anti-smoking campaign that portrays tobacco executives as evil scoundrels. One ad he wrote warns: "The tobacco industry is not your friend."
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BUSINESS
November 9, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The ad agency that put Alaska Airlines on the map now plans to place itself in the Los Angeles atlas by opening an office here. Livingston & Co., the Seattle agency that creates those passengers-as-saps ads for Alaska Airlines and the 1950s-themed ads for In-N-Out Burger, will open in Los Angeles by Jan. 1. "You cannot ignore Los Angeles and practice advertising in Western America," said Roger Livingston, the president and chief executive who will move here to oversee the office.
BUSINESS
March 6, 1991 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 40 years in the advertising business, Paul Keye is starting over. Last month, Paul Keye left behind the rubble of the once-dynamic agency he co-founded, Keye/Donna/Pearlstein, to become chairman of the newly opened Los Angeles ad firm Livingston & Keye. Keye, 61, created the state's anti-smoking campaign that portrays tobacco executives as evil scoundrels. One ad he wrote warns: "The tobacco industry is not your friend."
BUSINESS
February 9, 1991 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the most creative but financially strapped ad firms in Los Angeles, Keye/Donna/Pearlstein, is expected to announce next week plans to merge with the Seattle agency Livingston & Co. A deal has been signed which would rename the ad firm Livingston & Keye, according to well-placed industry sources who asked not to be identified. Many--but not all--of Keye/Donna's estimated 30 employees will be retained by Livingston.
BUSINESS
October 11, 1989 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In-N-Out Burger, the plain-wrap hamburger chain with a cult following of Los Angeles area customers, said Tuesday that its estimated $5-million advertising business has been handed to a Seattle advertising agency. That agency, Livingston & Co., which creates the often zany ads for Alaska Airlines, said it may open a branch office in Los Angeles. "Nothing would make us happier than to open a Los Angeles office," said Roger Livingston, president of Livingston & Co.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1991 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
When out-of-town agencies open branches in Los Angeles, most competitors welcome them with Bronx cheers--at best. Local advertisers often respond with equal enthusiasm. But lured by the prospects of fat ad revenues, agencies from New York, Boston, Chicago, San Francisco and, most recently, Seattle have all amassed here to grab the mythical brass ring. Some have closed within just a few years. Others remain--despite years of losses--to impress big East Coast clients. A few have flourished.
BUSINESS
March 5, 1991 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Joe Eisaman isn't shy to admit it. He's on the prowl to merge his agency with a smaller ad firm. "It might never have happened in better times," said Eisaman, whose Los Angeles agency Eisaman, Johns & Laws Advertising, creates ads for Neutrogena and Price Pfister. "But rather than everyone hunkering down, I see the opportunity for two small agencies to both get stronger by merging." By one estimate, nearly half of the 250 or so agencies in the Los Angeles area are scouting around for partners.
BUSINESS
November 10, 1987 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Some critics have accused Michael Jackson of having feet of clay. Now, Will Vinton Productions is going to make sure of it. The folks that made those soulful clay raisins dance across TV screens nationwide are about to turn Jackson into their next clay creation. The Play Doh-like version of Jackson will join company with such advertising luminaries as the pogo-sticking Domino's Pizza "Noid" and the walking, talking can of Spam. Of course, Jackson won't be selling pizza, raisins or even Spam.
BUSINESS
November 9, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The ad agency that put Alaska Airlines on the map now plans to place itself in the Los Angeles atlas by opening an office here. Livingston & Co., the Seattle agency that creates those passengers-as-saps ads for Alaska Airlines and the 1950s-themed ads for In-N-Out Burger, will open in Los Angeles by Jan. 1. "You cannot ignore Los Angeles and practice advertising in Western America," said Roger Livingston, the president and chief executive who will move here to oversee the office.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2013 | By Michael Phillips
When a really good new horror film comes out, one that's more about creative intelligence than executing the next grisly kill shot, it's something of a miracle in this eviscerating post-"Saw" era. Old-school and supremely confident in its attack, "The Conjuring" is this year's miracle - an "Amityville Horror" for a new century (and a far better movie than that 1979 hit), yet firmly rooted, without being slavish or self-conscious, in the visual language of 1970s filmmaking. Also like "Amityville," "The Conjuring" derives from an alleged true-life haunting, this one in rural Rhode Island, at an old house where terrible things happened and are happening still.
BUSINESS
May 10, 1988 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
Joe Isuzu is hawking hamburgers. The California raisins are dancing for a breakfast cereal. Suddenly two wildly successful commercial characters created specifically to hype one product are selling something else. People know Joe Isuzu as the guy who lies about Isuzu cars and trucks. But now he's on loan to Burger King to push its new Big Cheese burger in a tie-in with an Isuzu sweepstakes. And everyone knows that the dancing raisins hoof it for the California Raisin Advisory Board.
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