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Roger Mahony

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2013 | By Victoria Kim and Harriet Ryan,
Los Angeles Times
As archbishop of Los Angeles, Roger Mahony responded to criticism of his handling of sexual abuse cases with a high-priced crisis management firm, full-page ads in Spanish and English newspapers, and a report naming accused priests. In retirement, Mahony's public relations operation consists mainly of his thoughts and a computer keyboard. Since last month, when outrage flared anew over files showing he shielded abusers, the cardinal has thrown himself into social media to give the public his side of the story.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 2013
Join Times reporters Ashley Powers and Victoria Kim for an L.A. Now Live chat at 9 a.m. Thursday to discuss their series on Cardinal Roger Mahony and his role in the Catholic Church's child abuse sex scandal. FULL STORY: Clergy abuse cases were a threat to agenda Powers, Kim and reporter Harriet Ryan examined Mahony's role and actions in a two-day series of stories. They wrote: In the child sex abuse scandal that has shaken the Catholic Church, Mahony is a singular figure.
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OPINION
December 26, 1993 | Robert Scheer, Robert Scheer is a contributing editor to The Times
The cardinal's red rose, the tiny lapel designation of his exalted rank in the church hierarchy, an elector of the Pope, seems out of place as he makes his way through downtown Los Angeles, dropping off shoes at one store and chatting with the proprietor of another. To one who knew him when he was the bishop of Stockton and an advocate for farm workers, the man seems unchanged by place or position.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 2013
From the start of his tenure as the leader of L.A.'s Catholics, Roger Mahony had ambitious plans for the archdiocese. But clergy molestation claims were vying for his attention.
MAGAZINE
December 17, 1989 | PAUL CIOTTI, Times staff writer.
IT'S 10 O'CLOCK in the morning at Van Nuys Airport. Roman Catholic Archbishop Roger M. Mahony settles into the cockpit of his blue-and-white Hughes 500D four-passenger jet helicopter, offers a brief silent prayer, then fires up the turbine, eases up on the collective and lifts lightly off the flight line. He rotates right, pours on the power and climbs out to the northwest at maximum torque into a warm, hazy morning.
NEWS
June 15, 1992 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cardinal Roger M. Mahony did not rise to archbishop of Los Angeles--where Mass is celebrated every Sunday in 42 languages and the Roman Catholic flock grows by 1,000 each week--at the age of 49 without arousing suspicions, bruising egos and making enemies. It is a lesson Mahony learned early on.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1992 | From a Times Staff Writer
In response to the scheduling of California's first execution in 25 years, Cardinal Roger Mahony on Wednesday reminded Roman Catholics of their church's opposition to capital punishment. The death penalty "is a continuation of the violence and gross disrespect for human life that began with the original criminal act," Mahony wrote in a statement published in the Tidings, the newspaper of the Archdiocese of Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1994 | JOHN DART
It was an entry typical of high school yearbooks, the meaning of inside jokes lost over time but the youthful humor in evidence: "Roger Mahony, local salesman for Mother Fletcher's Nose Slings, recently purchased twin barracudas from Charlie's Fish Hatchery. He plans to raise them in the swimming pool."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1987 | JACK JONES, Times Staff Writer
The nation's new immigration law should be "interpreted and implemented as generously as possible" so that members of a large "shadow society" may gain legal status quickly and cheaply, Los Angeles Archbishop Roger Mahony has told federal immigration officials. In a letter to Immigration and Naturalization Service Commissioner Alan C. Nelson on the agency's proposed regulations implementing the act, Mahony emphasized that they should reflect church principles, such as preservation of families.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1987
Roman Catholic Archbishop Roger Mahony of Los Angeles, who has long been an advocate of migrant farm workers, has been appointed to the new federal Commission on Agricultural Workers provided under the recently enacted immigration reform law. Just before he retired as Speaker of the House of Representatives, Thomas P. (Tip) O'Neill Jr. named Mahony to the 12-member commission. The body will report to the House within five years on wide-ranging aspects of the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2013 | By Victoria Kim and Harriet Ryan,
Los Angeles Times
As archbishop of Los Angeles, Roger Mahony responded to criticism of his handling of sexual abuse cases with a high-priced crisis management firm, full-page ads in Spanish and English newspapers, and a report naming accused priests. In retirement, Mahony's public relations operation consists mainly of his thoughts and a computer keyboard. Since last month, when outrage flared anew over files showing he shielded abusers, the cardinal has thrown himself into social media to give the public his side of the story.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe and Richard Winton, Los Angeles Times
Nearly two weeks ago, Los Angeles Archbishop Jose Gomez announced he had removed Cardinal Roger Mahony from all public duties amid revelations that he plotted to conceal child molestation by priests from law enforcement. But Mahony on Monday found himself back at the center of church business, as one of 117 cardinals who will elect a successor to Pope Benedict XVI. Mahony was quick to weigh in on the papal news - posting a statement on his online blog at 8:38 a.m., two hours before the archdiocese announced that Gomez would issue his own remarks at the midday Mass at the downtown Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2013 | Steve Lopez
Do we have a little spat going on now at the Archdiocese of Los Angeles? Archbishop Jose Gomez and Cardinal Roger M. Mahony seemed to be going at each other in recent days over the molestation scandal that just won't die, thanks to Mahony's years-long efforts to keep all the dirty little secrets under wraps. On Wednesday, Gomez issued a rebuke, announcing that Mahony was being relieved of public duties now that the priest personnel records have been made public. And by the way, I'm not clear as to why it took Gomez two years to look into the files he describes as making "brutal and painful reading," for their descriptions of behavior that was "terribly sad and evil.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2013 | By Joseph Serna, Los Angeles Times
Built in the 18th century, Our Lady Queen of Angels Church on Olvera Street is a historic landmark that Cardinal Roger Mahony would frequently visit for various events, including the popular blessing of the animals. But on Thursday, the mood at the Spanish Colonial chapel was decidedly more sober as parishioners quietly discussed Archbishop Jose H. Gomez's dramatic decision to strip Mahony of any public and administrative church duties in the wake of the priest abuse scandal. There were only a handful of people at the church Thursday evening.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2013 | By Victoria Kim, Ashley Powers and Harriet Ryan
Fifteen years before the clergy sex abuse scandal came to light, Archbishop Roger M. Mahony and a top advisor plotted to conceal child molestation by priests from law enforcement, including keeping them out of California to avoid prosecution, according to internal Catholic church records released Monday. The archdiocese's failure to purge pedophile clergy and reluctance to cooperate with law enforcement has previously been known. But the memos written in 1986 and 1987 by Mahony and Msgr.
OPINION
March 9, 2011 | Tim Rutten
Cardinal Roger Mahony journeyed to Rome recently, where Pope Benedict XVI formally accepted his resignation as archbishop of Los Angeles, bringing to a close the Hollywood-born prelate's quarter-century at the head of America's largest Catholic community. At the end of last month, Mahony turned 75, the age at which bishops must offer to step down. As a cardinal, he will retain the right to participate in papal elections until he reaches 80. Though retired from day-to-day management of the archdiocese, Mahony will continue living at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels, campaigning for immigration reform and serving as an official advisor to the Holy See on issues involving finance and social communication.
OPINION
October 18, 2005
Re "Study Reveals Vast Scope of Priest Abuse," Oct. 13 If any institution other than the Catholic Church experienced a scandal anywhere near the magnitude of this one, that institution would go belly up. And if anyone other than a cardinal attempted to block justice the way Roger Mahony has, that person would long since have been imprisoned. The entire scandal is but one manifestation of the undeserved privileged status that religion enjoys in our society. The only upside to all this is that, just possibly, the American public may finally begin to realize that religion and morality are not two sides of the same coin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1988 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
Archbishop Roger Mahony announced Friday that he has directed officials of the Los Angeles Archdiocese to take steps leading to an election among Archdiocese cemetery workers to determine if they want to be represented by a union. Mahony's announcement came one day after he received a letter from the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union requesting that an election be held by an impartial third party to be jointly chosen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2011 | By Mitchell Landsberg, Los Angeles Times
Cardinal Roger Mahony walked slowly across the sanctuary of the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels, leaning softly on his shepherd's staff as he completed one of his last public acts as archbishop of Los Angeles. Passing the altar on one side and his assembled bishops on the other, he finally reached the man who was taking over his position as head of the nation's largest Roman Catholic archdiocese. Mahony handed the crooked staff, known as a crosier, to Archbishop Jose Gomez, symbolizing one of the most ancient traditions of the church, the transfer of authority from one bishop to another.
OPINION
February 26, 2011 | Tim Rutten
When the social and political history of Los Angeles in the late 20th century comes to be written, it's likely that two men will stand out as fundamentally transformative leaders. One will be Tom Bradley, the five-term mayor who changed the city's politics and realigned its economic course; the other will be Cardinal Roger Mahony, the Hollywood-born prelate who has led what is now America's largest Roman Catholic diocese as archbishop for the last quarter-century, a post from which he will retire Sunday on his 75th birthday, as church law requires.
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