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Roger Maris

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SPORTS
September 8, 1998
Despite being traded, Mark McGwire fell only three home runs short of Roger Maris' mark last year, and the Cardinal slugger is well ahead of the record place after about one-third of the season.
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SPORTS
August 17, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
Mark McGwire grew up in the San Gabriel Valley. For him, the guy was Dave Kingman. "I tried to beg my dad to take us to the games if the Cubs were in town," McGwire said. Mark Trumbo grew up down the street from Angel Stadium. For him, the guy was Troy Glaus. "As a kid coming to the games, you really hoped he might get into one," Trumbo said. That is the most magical of moments in baseball, that one crack of the bat, that instant when Mighty Casey takes a swing and launches the ball on a majestic arc. It is high, it is far, it is gone.
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SPORTS
December 20, 1985 | United Press International
Roger Maris was buried in a steady snowfall Thursday, borne to his grave by former New York Yankee teammates and eulogized as a great baseball player who received a "base on balls" to heaven. Former Yankees Mickey Mantle, Whitey Ford, Clete Boyer and Bill Skowron were among the pallbearers at Holy Cross Cemetery, where the family of Maris' wife, Patricia Ann, is interred. Other pallbearers included Maris' former St.
SPORTS
July 16, 2013
Baltimore slugger Chris Davis said Monday that he considers the single-season home run record to be Roger Maris' 61, rather than the official mark of 73 set by Barry Bonds. Davis is on pace to hit 62 this year. How convenient. Actually, he was referring to the widely held belief that Bonds' number was enhanced by steroids and Maris' was not. Either way, Davis could find himself in some pretty lofty company by the end of the season. But will he reach any of the magic numbers?
SPORTS
September 8, 1991 | SHIRLEY POVICH, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON POST
In the first place, there never was an asterisk. It was the creation of the nation's baseball writers. They were trying, in a word, to explain commissioner Ford Frick's strung-out ruling in 1961 -- the one that was to doom Roger Maris to second-class home-run status in a year when he hit more homers (61) than any other player who ever swung a bat in the majors.
SPORTS
January 23, 1988
The failure to induct Roger Maris into the Hall of Fame should signal that it is time to reevaluate the system by which an athlete qualifies for this honor. Few players have had an impact on the game of baseball as did Roger Maris. He broke Babe Ruth's record with 61 home runs in 1961, aging 10 years in the process. In his last year of eligibility, Maris finished ninth in the voting for an award he earned. He may not have been a great interview, but let achievement speak for itself.
SPORTS
December 16, 1985 | MIKE DOWNEY
It does not seem possible that we could earmark the life of a man with a single, simple piece of punctuation. He existed for 51 years, got married, made friends, played baseball. His life did not end when he put down his bat. It ended Saturday in a Houston hospital's cancer ward, nearly a quarter of a century since the damnable asterisk was first attached to his name. There was no shaking it once it was there. It clung to him like a leech.
SPORTS
March 31, 1996 | JON HEYMAN, NEWSDAY
Everybody knows about Roger Maris losing hair as the stress of the home run chase got to him. But few knew about Reggie Jackson's hives. In 1969, Jackson was taking dead aim at Maris' mark and he had 37 home runs at the All-Star break. However, Jackson was just 23 years old, and he was nervous about chasing Babe Ruth and Maris. A decade later Reggie would be known as Mr. October because nobody relished the spotlight more than Jackson, who came to New York to make his nickname.
SPORTS
December 15, 1985 | ROSS NEWHAN, Times Staff Writer
Roger Maris, vilified as much as he was applauded for hitting 61 home runs in 1961 to break Babe Ruth's 1927 record of 60 homers in a season, died of cancer Saturday in Houston. He was 51. Maris had learned in November 1983 that he was suffering from lymphoma, a form of cancer that attacks the lymph glands. A doctor at the time told Maris that it had gone undetected for five years.
SPORTS
December 21, 1985
Two of the most indefensible oversights of our time: Jorge Luis Borges never having been awarded the Nobel Prize for literature and Roger Maris never being elected to baseball's Hall of Fame. As a result, the literary world is overrun with obscure Nobelist Czechoslovakian poets, and the Hall of Fame is bursting to the seams with obscure turn-of-the-century utility infielders. PHIL STEPHENS Santa Barbara
SPORTS
July 15, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
Your browser does not support iframes. NEW YORK -- Chris Davis of the Baltimore Orioles leads the major leagues with 37 home runs. He is on pace to hit 62, which would set a new single-season record. According to him, anyway. "In my opinion, 61 is the record," Davis said Monday, "and I think most fans agree with me on that. " Roger Maris hit 61 home runs in 1961. The Maris record since has been eclipsed six times -- by Barry Bonds once, Mark McGwire twice and Sammy Sosa three times.
SPORTS
August 31, 2009 | JERRY CROWE
It happened so quickly -- almost in the blink of an eye -- that Carroll Hardy remembers precious few details. It seemed so insignificant. "Nobody thought a thing about it," Hardy says. "It wasn't a big deal, that's for sure." The date was Sept. 20, 1960. Hardy, a baseball journeyman, was nestled into his usual spot on the bench. The reserve outfielder and his Boston Red Sox teammates were in Baltimore, where Ted Williams was playing out the final days of his Hall of Fame career.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2009 | TIMES STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS
Woodie Held, 77, who played 14 years in the major leagues and was traded for future home run king Roger Maris, died Thursday in Dubois, Wyo., after a long bout with cancer, the Cleveland Indians announced. Held played for seven American League teams, including the 1966 World Series champion Baltimore Orioles and the California Angels in 1967 and '68. But he spent most of his career with Cleveland after being acquired June 15, 1958, from the Kansas City Athletics in a multiplayer trade for Maris.
BUSINESS
August 25, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Anheuser-Busch Cos., the world's largest brewer, said the terms of a legal settlement with the family of late baseball home run king Roger Maris included a payment of $120 million in cash. The company announced the settlement Tuesday to resolve a defamation lawsuit that was nearing a verdict and a breach-of-contract suit that reached a $139-million verdict four years ago.
BUSINESS
August 24, 2005 | From Associated Press
The family of former home run king Roger Maris and Anheuser-Busch Cos. settled a defamation lawsuit stemming from the brewer's termination of the family's beer distributorship just as jurors reached a verdict Tuesday. Neither side disclosed terms of the settlement, which came as the all-female jury reached a decision that was sealed, on the second day of deliberations in a three-week trial in state civil court. The Maris family had been seeking as much as $5 billion.
SPORTS
September 22, 2001
Is it just me or does Barry Bonds' charitable offer of $10,000 for every home run he hits seem ungenuine and self-serving? I think he is very much like Roger Maris: No one wants him to break the home run record. So he concocts a clever scheme to get everyone to root for him. So Barry, what happens if you hit zero homers? How much will you donate then? Nothing? Then we cheered for naught? Sorry Barry, no amount of money will get me to cheer for a jerk like you. Su Pak Los Angeles
SPORTS
January 4, 1986
It is indeed tragic that Roger Maris got the recognition he deserved only after his death rather than 24 years ago when he broke Babe Ruth's single season home run record. However, the letter writer (Viewpoint, Dec. 21) is misguided in arguing that Maris belongs in the Hall of Fame. Ever hear of Earl Webb? He holds the single-season record for doubles with 67 in 1931. Ever hear of Owen Wilson? He holds the single-season record for triples with 36 in 1912. Neither is in the Hall of Fame, nor should they be. The year Maris hit 61 homers was the only time in 12 seasons he led the league in homers.
SPORTS
June 22, 2001
Game number that corresponds to home runs (black circles with white numbers) hit by Barry Bonds this season and by Mark McGwire and Roger Maris in their record-setting seasons. Bonds' projected home runs for the rest of season after Game 71 are indicated by circles with white backgrounds and bold-faced numbers: NOTE: Projections based on Bonds hitting a home run every 1.89 games. St. Louis played 163 games in 1998 (one tie on Aug. 24). McGwire did not homer in the tie game.
SPORTS
May 12, 2001
Regarding Arnold Regardie's letter [May 5], I'm sorry, Mr. Regardie, but journeymen ballplayers don't hit 33 home runs, much less 39 or 61. Journeymen aren't voted the league's MVP in consecutive years; they don't drive in 100 runs three years in a row, peaking at 142, and they don't help their teams reach the World Series seven years out of nine. (Although Scott Brosius could prove to be the exception to that one.) Some journeymen hit a home run in their very first World Series at-bat, and Roger Maris did that too. But that's where the comparison ends.
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