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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2003 | Helene Elliott, Times Staff Writer
Roger Neilson, whose eccentric manner and spectacularly ugly neckties masked one of the sharpest minds in hockey, died Saturday at his home in the Ontario community of Peterborough, Canada. He had turned 69 on Monday. Neilson had suffered from multiple myeloma -- cancer of the bone marrow -- and skin cancer. The disease reportedly had spread to his brain.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2003 | Helene Elliott, Times Staff Writer
Roger Neilson, whose eccentric manner and spectacularly ugly neckties masked one of the sharpest minds in hockey, died Saturday at his home in the Ontario community of Peterborough, Canada. He had turned 69 on Monday. Neilson had suffered from multiple myeloma -- cancer of the bone marrow -- and skin cancer. The disease reportedly had spread to his brain.
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SPORTS
November 3, 1989 | BRUCE BERLET, HARTFORD COURANT
Coach Roger Neilson sits in his office, a video machine to the left and chalkboard to the right, both nearly within arm's reach. About 30 feet away, in the players' lounge, eight Rangers on the floor and on sofas study a television spewing out game highlights. It's also connected to a satellite dish that can pick up games throughout North America -- as is the TV at the team's Rye, N.Y., training facility.
SPORTS
June 20, 2002 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roger Neilson never has cared much for convention. Through coaching stints with eight teams, including a 28-game tenure with the Kings in the 1983-84 season, he rode his bicycle nearly everywhere, wore shorts year-round and rummaged through bargain bins for the $5 ties he reluctantly knotted around his neck on game days. But his election Wednesday to the Hockey Hall of Fame, the most significant rite for a hockey player or administrator, had a profound effect on hockey's favorite free spirit.
SPORTS
August 16, 1989
Roger Neilson, who coached four NHL teams including a short stint with the Kings, was named coach of the New York Rangers.
SPORTS
March 19, 1999 | Associated Press
Former Pittsburgh Penguin star Mario Lemieux promised to raise $50 million as part of his plan to buy the team and rescue it from bankruptcy. . . . Philadelphia Flyer Coach Roger Neilson was suspended for two games and fined $10,000 for throwing a stick onto the ice in Tuesday's loss to the St. Louis Blues at St. Louis.
SPORTS
December 11, 1999 | Associated Press
Roger Neilson, who has coached more NHL teams than anyone, has bone cancer but does not intend to miss any games with the Philadelphia Flyers. He was upbeat Friday, saying he will begin three months of chemotherapy followed by a bone marrow transplant. Doctors said the cancer is controllable for several years, and Flyer team doctor Jeff Hartzell said a full recovery remained possible.
SPORTS
April 5, 2001
Only NHL coaches with 400 wins but losing playoff records-x Billy Reay (599 wins): 57-60 in playoffs Bryan Murray (518 wins): 34-44 in playoffs Roger Neilson (483 wins): 40-48 in playoffs Punch Imlach (439 wins): 44-48 in playoffs Emile Francis (433 wins): 40-53 in playoffs Sid Abel (414 wins): 32-44 in playoffs x-18 NHL coaches have 400 wins; through 1999-2000 season Source: World Features Syndicate
SPORTS
April 25, 2000 | From Associated Press
Roger Neilson will return to the Flyers for their playoff series against Pittsburgh, but he will not be behind the bench, team officials in Philadelphia announced. Neilson, recovering from a stem-cell transplant for bone marrow cancer, will assist interim Coach Craig Ramsay when the Flyer-Penguin series begins this week. Neilson and General Manager Bob Clarke discussed the decision at practice Monday. Dr.
SPORTS
February 20, 2000 | From Associated Press
His voice shaky but still delivering punch lines, Philadelphia Flyer Coach Roger Neilson announced Saturday night he will leave the team for the rest of the regular season to undergo cancer treatment. Neilson will begin scheduled, aggressive treatment Monday for multiple myeloma, a rare form of bone marrow cancer he was diagnosed with Dec. 9. Assistant Craig Ramsay will take over as coach, with help from assistant Wayne Cashman and minor-league coach Mike Stothers.
SPORTS
April 5, 2001
Only NHL coaches with 400 wins but losing playoff records-x Billy Reay (599 wins): 57-60 in playoffs Bryan Murray (518 wins): 34-44 in playoffs Roger Neilson (483 wins): 40-48 in playoffs Punch Imlach (439 wins): 44-48 in playoffs Emile Francis (433 wins): 40-53 in playoffs Sid Abel (414 wins): 32-44 in playoffs x-18 NHL coaches have 400 wins; through 1999-2000 season Source: World Features Syndicate
SPORTS
April 25, 2000 | From Associated Press
Roger Neilson will return to the Flyers for their playoff series against Pittsburgh, but he will not be behind the bench, team officials in Philadelphia announced. Neilson, recovering from a stem-cell transplant for bone marrow cancer, will assist interim Coach Craig Ramsay when the Flyer-Penguin series begins this week. Neilson and General Manager Bob Clarke discussed the decision at practice Monday. Dr.
SPORTS
February 20, 2000 | From Associated Press
His voice shaky but still delivering punch lines, Philadelphia Flyer Coach Roger Neilson announced Saturday night he will leave the team for the rest of the regular season to undergo cancer treatment. Neilson will begin scheduled, aggressive treatment Monday for multiple myeloma, a rare form of bone marrow cancer he was diagnosed with Dec. 9. Assistant Craig Ramsay will take over as coach, with help from assistant Wayne Cashman and minor-league coach Mike Stothers.
SPORTS
February 3, 2000 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It began during training camp, with a lethargic feeling and a cough he couldn't shake. While visiting Anaheim and Los Angeles in November, Flyer Coach Roger Neilson made light of his obvious fatigue and insisted a few days in the sun would restore his energy and make everything right again. If only it were that simple. If only sunshine and relaxation could cure the multiple myeloma--bone marrow cancer--that has attacked his body. "For two months I was kind of under the weather.
SPORTS
January 2, 2000 | ALAN ROBINSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Philadelphia Flyer Coach Roger Neilson, undergoing treatment for the same type of cancer that killed his sister two years ago, is not terrified by the thought he might not survive. Doctors say he has another 5-15 years to live if his treatment goes well, but he also understands the projection might be optimistic. But if fear is a word in Neilson's vocabulary, he has not yet spoken it. "Am I afraid? No," Neilson said after rejoining the Flyers in Calgary following a short Christmas layoff.
SPORTS
December 11, 1999 | Associated Press
Roger Neilson, who has coached more NHL teams than anyone, has bone cancer but does not intend to miss any games with the Philadelphia Flyers. He was upbeat Friday, saying he will begin three months of chemotherapy followed by a bone marrow transplant. Doctors said the cancer is controllable for several years, and Flyer team doctor Jeff Hartzell said a full recovery remained possible.
SPORTS
June 20, 2002 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roger Neilson never has cared much for convention. Through coaching stints with eight teams, including a 28-game tenure with the Kings in the 1983-84 season, he rode his bicycle nearly everywhere, wore shorts year-round and rummaged through bargain bins for the $5 ties he reluctantly knotted around his neck on game days. But his election Wednesday to the Hockey Hall of Fame, the most significant rite for a hockey player or administrator, had a profound effect on hockey's favorite free spirit.
SPORTS
January 6, 1993 | LISA DILLMAN
The firing of Ranger Coach Roger Neilson came down to a simple power struggle--Mark Messier vs. Neilson. Lost in the hype of that battle was the notion that Neilson might not have been the right coach for the Rangers. He's ideal for a bunch of grinders, not swift-skating star players. For the Rangers, his tactics were unsuitable. Messier believed this. And if Messier thought it, so did his teammates. Neilson refused to back down and lost his job.
SPORTS
March 19, 1999 | Associated Press
Former Pittsburgh Penguin star Mario Lemieux promised to raise $50 million as part of his plan to buy the team and rescue it from bankruptcy. . . . Philadelphia Flyer Coach Roger Neilson was suspended for two games and fined $10,000 for throwing a stick onto the ice in Tuesday's loss to the St. Louis Blues at St. Louis.
SPORTS
January 6, 1993 | LISA DILLMAN
The firing of Ranger Coach Roger Neilson came down to a simple power struggle--Mark Messier vs. Neilson. Lost in the hype of that battle was the notion that Neilson might not have been the right coach for the Rangers. He's ideal for a bunch of grinders, not swift-skating star players. For the Rangers, his tactics were unsuitable. Messier believed this. And if Messier thought it, so did his teammates. Neilson refused to back down and lost his job.
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