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Roger Norrington

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1997 | JANET STOBART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Roger Norrington is a self-described crusader, a conductor on a mission. His passion is the pursuit of authenticity--rediscovering and performing great classical works as closely as possible to the way they were originally composed and played. Delving into music history, from tone to technique, he has produced performances that, to say the least, surprise the ear attuned to the sounds of modern instruments.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1998 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Second-night blues got the Los Angeles Philharmonic on Thursday night, when podium guest Roger Norrington completed his two-concert engagement of this first subscription week of the 1998 summer season at Hollywood Bowl. Leading a Beethoven program quickly, as is his wont, the British conductor found few of the thrills we know inhabit the Violin Concerto and Seventh Symphony.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1990 | JOHN HENKEN
Early music isn't what it used to be. For one thing, the music--once generally thought of as Bach or older--is not so early any more. Relative arrivistes such as Berlioz and even Brahms have fallen into the fold. It seems less dogmatic now, and more exciting. It is also big business, with groups such as the San Francisco-based Philharmonia Baroque, and the Hanover Band and London Classical Players from England becoming popular successes as well as critics' darlings.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1998 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
It would be interesting to discover just what Roger Norrington was thinking Tuesday night, when he conducted his curious performance of Mahler's Second Symphony to open the Los Angeles Philharmonic's subscription series at the Hollywood Bowl. Often we do know what is on his mind, because he eagerly addresses the audience, as he did at the Philharmonic's Brahms Experience last season. And often it's a mix illuminating the historical circumstances of the music, with his own narrative fantasies.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1995
I enjoyed an L.A. Philharmonic concert last month. It reminded me again that the orchestra can produce excellent performances of the standard repertoire, this time under the baton of Mikhail Pletnev. Unfortunately, such performances only seem to occur with visiting conductors including Simon Rattle and Roger Norrington, and underline the inability of Music Director Esa-Pekka Salonen to demonstrate the orchestra's fine playing in the music that most of the audience enjoys, though apparently not him. I can therefore only deplore the decision to extend his contract, and perhaps rebuke Philharmonic Managing Director Ernest Fleischmann for the treatment of former Music Director Andre Previn.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1996 | DANIEL CARIAGA
With Esa-Pekka Salonen off the premises until next season, guest conductors occupy the remaining weeks of this Los Angeles Philharmonic season. Roger Norrington, first of these visitors--and probably the only one who will eschew the use of a podium--led the orchestra in a program sans soloists Thursday night in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. As he usually does, the British musician led provocative performances, obviously pleasing a ready-to-be-thrilled audience with Haydn's Symphony No.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1996 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Distractingly calm--so calm, he seems to wander on- and offstage like a lost pedestrian--Roger Norrington stands before the Los Angeles Philharmonic with only one apparent goal: to make sensible music. To start his second week here, the British conductor led the orchestra in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion on Thursday night, producing eminently apprehensible, attractive and authoritative performances. These readings illuminated their composers' thinking and underlined many details in the scores.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1996 | Herbert Glass, Herbert Glass is a regular contributor to Calendar
Way back in the '80s, we thought that period-performance specialists were daring when they ventured beyond Mozart. Since then, the boundaries have been stretched to include Beethoven, Schubert, Schumann, Berlioz and Brahms. "Authentic" Mahler and "Sacre du Printemps" as it may have sounded to listeners when it was young are just around the corner.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1998 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Second-night blues got the Los Angeles Philharmonic on Thursday night, when podium guest Roger Norrington completed his two-concert engagement of this first subscription week of the 1998 summer season at Hollywood Bowl. Leading a Beethoven program quickly, as is his wont, the British conductor found few of the thrills we know inhabit the Violin Concerto and Seventh Symphony.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1996 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Back when irreverence still mattered, John Cage inspired a food fight among stuffy academics by proclaiming that Beethoven was wrong in his emphasis upon harmony and psychological form, and that his influence on history was lamentable. What's more, his feet were too big!
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1997 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
That classical music is so eager to celebrate the deaths of composers can certainly strike some of us as morbid. At best, it's not a very good image for an art form already perceived to be more weighted in the past than the present. Yet thinking about Brahms 100 years after his death in 1897 makes sense. He died at a time not unlike our own. A century was turning, and Europe, in particular, was obsessed with the notions of a modern age.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1997 | JANET STOBART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Roger Norrington is a self-described crusader, a conductor on a mission. His passion is the pursuit of authenticity--rediscovering and performing great classical works as closely as possible to the way they were originally composed and played. Delving into music history, from tone to technique, he has produced performances that, to say the least, surprise the ear attuned to the sounds of modern instruments.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1996 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Distractingly calm--so calm, he seems to wander on- and offstage like a lost pedestrian--Roger Norrington stands before the Los Angeles Philharmonic with only one apparent goal: to make sensible music. To start his second week here, the British conductor led the orchestra in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion on Thursday night, producing eminently apprehensible, attractive and authoritative performances. These readings illuminated their composers' thinking and underlined many details in the scores.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1996 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Back when irreverence still mattered, John Cage inspired a food fight among stuffy academics by proclaiming that Beethoven was wrong in his emphasis upon harmony and psychological form, and that his influence on history was lamentable. What's more, his feet were too big!
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1996 | DANIEL CARIAGA
With Esa-Pekka Salonen off the premises until next season, guest conductors occupy the remaining weeks of this Los Angeles Philharmonic season. Roger Norrington, first of these visitors--and probably the only one who will eschew the use of a podium--led the orchestra in a program sans soloists Thursday night in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. As he usually does, the British musician led provocative performances, obviously pleasing a ready-to-be-thrilled audience with Haydn's Symphony No.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1996 | Herbert Glass, Herbert Glass is a regular contributor to Calendar
Way back in the '80s, we thought that period-performance specialists were daring when they ventured beyond Mozart. Since then, the boundaries have been stretched to include Beethoven, Schubert, Schumann, Berlioz and Brahms. "Authentic" Mahler and "Sacre du Printemps" as it may have sounded to listeners when it was young are just around the corner.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1989 | HERBERT GLASS
In notes for one of his recordings, the British period-performance specialist Roger Norrington asserts that "Beethoven's works are much more like Haydn than Wagner, and they ought to sound like it." Simple, incontestable, usually unheeded words. And in their latest Beethoven-- the "Eroica" Symphony (EMI/Angel 49101) and, with the excellent fortepianist Melvyn Tan, the First and Second Piano Concertos (EMI/Angel 49509)--conductor Norrington and his London Classical Players orchestra convincingly communicate Beethoven's bracing, sharp-edged, Haydnesque sound.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1990 | HERBERT GLASS
Everybody knows Schubert's Ninth, the "Great" C-major Symphony, right? Hardly. What we've been listening to and admiring for a century-and-a-half is, if not an impostor, then at best an unreasonable facsimile. We are not talking the sorts of obscure interpretive points that fill musicologists' waking (and perhaps sleeping) hours, but notes, rhythms and dynamics: the core musical components.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1995
I enjoyed an L.A. Philharmonic concert last month. It reminded me again that the orchestra can produce excellent performances of the standard repertoire, this time under the baton of Mikhail Pletnev. Unfortunately, such performances only seem to occur with visiting conductors including Simon Rattle and Roger Norrington, and underline the inability of Music Director Esa-Pekka Salonen to demonstrate the orchestra's fine playing in the music that most of the audience enjoys, though apparently not him. I can therefore only deplore the decision to extend his contract, and perhaps rebuke Philharmonic Managing Director Ernest Fleischmann for the treatment of former Music Director Andre Previn.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1994 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
It wasn't your average Thursday night with Beethoven and Berlioz at the Music Center. Not even close. The gangly guest on the podium, making his belated debut with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, was Roger Norrington. He doesn't follow the familiar rules. A sometime fugitive from the rarefied world of ancient music, a former tenor, a distinguished musicologist and a champion of historical authenticity, he brings an independent stylistic perspective even to the so-called standard repertory.
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