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Roger Pilon

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1991
Re "We Politicized the Court; We Can Redeem It," Column Right, Oct. 30: Roger Pilon says the problem of the politicized Supreme Court began with the Progressives (1900-1916). He should have gone back one more historical period and looked at the business and political ethics of the late 1800s. In that period, industrial and commercial wealth was used to buy control of much of American political (and judicial) life. We had a form of plutocracy. To defend democracy, there had to be Progressive governmental interventions.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1991
Re "We Politicized the Court; We Can Redeem It," Column Right, Oct. 30: Roger Pilon says the problem of the politicized Supreme Court began with the Progressives (1900-1916). He should have gone back one more historical period and looked at the business and political ethics of the late 1800s. In that period, industrial and commercial wealth was used to buy control of much of American political (and judicial) life. We had a form of plutocracy. To defend democracy, there had to be Progressive governmental interventions.
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NEWS
November 10, 1989 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Justice Department political appointee with a high security clearance was investigated last year for possibly disclosing classified information to the government of South Africa, government sources said Thursday. The official, Roger Pilon, a Ronald Reagan appointee who headed the Office of Asylum Policy and Review, subsequently resigned, but the circumstances of his departure are now the subject of dispute.
NEWS
May 20, 1990 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh, attempting to shield his closest personal aide, helped conceal the fact that the aide flunked a lie detector test during a highly sensitive Justice Department investigation, the agency's departing No. 2 official charged Saturday. Thornburgh also sought to keep the probe out of the hands of the department's internal watchdog unit, and, failing that, refused to follow the unit's recommendations for further investigation, Deputy Atty. Gen. Donald B.
NEWS
May 20, 1990 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh, attempting to shield his closest personal aide, helped conceal the fact that the aide flunked a lie detector test during a highly sensitive Justice Department investigation, the agency's departing No. 2 official charged Saturday. Thornburgh also sought to keep the probe out of the hands of the department's internal watchdog unit, and, failing that, refused to follow the unit's recommendations for further investigation, Deputy Atty. Gen. Donald B.
OPINION
November 2, 2006
Citing fairness to property owners, Roger Pilon praises Proposition 90, which would cause governmental agencies (and therefore taxpayers) to pay for restrictions on land use that "result in substantial economic loss" (Opinion, Oct. 30). This provision would seemingly apply if someone's real property is down-zoned or if building height restrictions are imposed. I contend that fairness to taxpayers necessitates a provision that would operate in both directions. When a property owner gets a conditional-use permit or a zone change increasing the permitted level of development, the owner should pay the governmental agency (taxpayers)
NEWS
July 15, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Justice Department has agreed to pay $250,000 to settle a violation of privacy lawsuit by Roger Pilon, a former senior Justice official who was exonerated after a lengthy Justice investigation into allegations that he and his wife passed classified information to South Africa, according to officials familiar with the settlement. The payment ends a legal battle that began nearly a decade ago. The federal government has already paid Pilon $25,000 for violating his privacy.
OPINION
July 17, 2005 | Brendan Buhler and Michael Soller
Last week, Supreme Court Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist swatted away rumors of his retirement. We convict these aspiring pundits of poor judgment. -- Brendan Buhler and Michael Soller * "I suspect that the chief justice will step down by next summer." -- Political scientist Sheldon Goldman in November 2002 * "William Rehnquist will retire soon."
NEWS
February 11, 1995 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Clinton Administration officials on Friday denounced as dangerous and costly a Republican proposal that would force government agencies to compensate property owners whose land is devalued by federal regulations. The compensation proposal, part of the House GOP's "contract with America" campaign manifesto, would require the federal government to pay compensation any time a regulation leads to reduction in the value of property by 10% or more.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1995
If The Times agrees that our federal budget be balanced, and that all it takes is congressional courage (editorial, Feb. 13), why after more than two generations, has it not been done? It is exactly because of lack of political courage that we need something more binding than the promises from our Congress and our presidents. Even though almost everything has been tried (freezes, caps, Gramm-Rudman, raising takes, etc.), the national debt will keep growing by about 5% a year. You claim that the Constitution should not be amended in haste, yet Congress has been debating this amendment for the past five years.
NEWS
November 10, 1989 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Justice Department political appointee with a high security clearance was investigated last year for possibly disclosing classified information to the government of South Africa, government sources said Thursday. The official, Roger Pilon, a Ronald Reagan appointee who headed the Office of Asylum Policy and Review, subsequently resigned, but the circumstances of his departure are now the subject of dispute.
NATIONAL
October 19, 2003 | Richard Simon, Times Staff Writer
California passes a tough financial privacy law, and Washington moves to scuttle it. State officials propose strict antipollution standards for certain kinds of engines, and a congressional committee moves to block the new rules. Gov. Gray Davis signs into law a measure allowing illegal immigrants to obtain drivers' licenses, and within days legislation is introduced in Congress to deny federal funds to the state unless it repeals the law.
NEWS
October 28, 1987 | RONALD L. SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
In a last-minute about-face, the Reagan Administration has dropped a proposal that would have barred those seeking political asylum from arguing their cases in open court, officials disclosed Tuesday. The Justice Department and Immigration and Naturalization Service had suggested the changes in an effort to expedite thousands of pending asylum cases and to protect applicants from potential reprisals.
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