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Roger Rees

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2011 | By James C. Taylor, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Roger Rees and Peter Pan go way back. The Welsh actor, director and impresario has been working on the current off-Broadway hit "Peter and the Starcatcher" for years, but his relationship with J.M. Barrie's fictional hero goes back almost 50 years. "My first acquaintance with Peter Pan was back when I lived in South London," Rees recalls over breakfast on the city's Upper West Side. "I was at art school and I needed to earn money, so I got a job as a stagehand at the Wimbledon Theatre and 'Peter Pan' was on tour there with Donald Sinden, who was playing Captain Hook.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
The Old Globe's new artistic director, Barry Edelstein, is a noted Shakespearean, and its 2013-14 season, the first he's picked, will give extra emphasis to the Bard, beyond the separate summer series that typically offers at least two Shakespeare plays in the outdoor theater that's part of the Old Globe complex in San Diego's Balboa Park. Edelstein will direct “The Winter's Tale” (Feb. 8-March 4, 2014), the first indoor Shakespeare play at the Old Globe since a 2001 staging of “A Midsummer Night's Dream.” And he's giving Shakespeare a new collaborator -- deceased Southern California-raised rocker Jeff Buckley -- in “The Last Goodbye,” (Sept.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1990 | IRV LETOFSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The producers of "Cheers" set out last summer to search for Rebecca's love interest. A pivotal role. As one gets a great award--an Oscar, a Pulitzer, a Nobel Prize--the highest reward in the legend of "Cheers" is Rebecca, who hasn't had sex in three years! And the winner was . . . not Sam Malone (as played by Ted Danson), who has been in heat for her every Thursday night on NBC since "Backseat Becky" (as played by Kirstie Alley) took over managership of the bar in 1987. No, the real winner was .
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2011 | By James C. Taylor, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Roger Rees and Peter Pan go way back. The Welsh actor, director and impresario has been working on the current off-Broadway hit "Peter and the Starcatcher" for years, but his relationship with J.M. Barrie's fictional hero goes back almost 50 years. "My first acquaintance with Peter Pan was back when I lived in South London," Rees recalls over breakfast on the city's Upper West Side. "I was at art school and I needed to earn money, so I got a job as a stagehand at the Wimbledon Theatre and 'Peter Pan' was on tour there with Donald Sinden, who was playing Captain Hook.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1999 | JAN BRESLAUER
To countless theatergoers, he will always be the title character in "The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby," the landmark 8 1/2-hour Royal Shakespeare Company production of the early 1980s that garnered its star Olivier and Tony awards for best actor, as well as an Emmy nomination. Others know him as Robin Colcord on the TV series "Cheers," or from his many feature films. Yet Roger Rees' greatest role, as his 25 years with the RSC attest, may well be that of team player.
NEWS
November 3, 2009
Roger Rees: A Quick Takes item in Saturday's Calendar said that Roger Rees canceled a spring tour of his one-man Shakespeare show, "What You Will." He did cancel appearances in Santa Barbara and Long Beach, as the item noted, but San Diego should not have been included. That engagement is still planned for the Old Globe, May 1 to June 6.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1989
The cast for the American premiere of Tom Stoppard's "Hapgood" has been set. Roger Rees, who will re-create the role he originated in the London production, stars with Simon Jones, Judy Davis, Richard Lawson and James Lancaster. The Ahmanson production will open April 12 at the James A. Doolittle Theatre in Hollywood. Low-priced previews begin April 1. Information: (213) 410-1062.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2004 | Don Shirley
Welsh actor and director Roger Rees will succeed Michael Ritchie, Center Theatre Group's next artistic director, in the top job at the Williamstown Theatre Festival in northwestern Massachusetts. Rees has directed four productions at Williamstown since 1997 and will hold the title of artistic director instead of producer, which has been Ritchie's title.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2000 | DON BRAUNAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Modern directors often don't win with "Love's Labour's Lost." It is Shakespeare's first and most verbal comedy, thin on action and plot and believed to have been originally written for a small group of intellectuals rather than the public. Its abundant wordplay is heavy with rhymes, puns and references increasingly obscure to current audiences. And finally, unlike his other comedies, it doesn't end with happy weddings for all. Roger Rees, however, has surmounted those obstacles.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1989 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
Axiomatic, my dear Watson: Count on Tom Stoppard to be clever. The first act of Stoppard's "Hapgood," the spy thriller that opened Wednesday at the Doolittle Theatre, is too clever by half--so clever that you never figure out what's going on. His second act is another story. The fog lifts, the sun comes out and all that plot, counterplot, subplot and overplot clear and coalesce--enough, anyway, so the characters at last take shape and we can actually begin to tell the good guys from the bad. Maybe.
NEWS
November 3, 2009
Roger Rees: A Quick Takes item in Saturday's Calendar said that Roger Rees canceled a spring tour of his one-man Shakespeare show, "What You Will." He did cancel appearances in Santa Barbara and Long Beach, as the item noted, but San Diego should not have been included. That engagement is still planned for the Old Globe, May 1 to June 6.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2004 | Don Shirley
Welsh actor and director Roger Rees will succeed Michael Ritchie, Center Theatre Group's next artistic director, in the top job at the Williamstown Theatre Festival in northwestern Massachusetts. Rees has directed four productions at Williamstown since 1997 and will hold the title of artistic director instead of producer, which has been Ritchie's title.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2000 | DON BRAUNAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Modern directors often don't win with "Love's Labour's Lost." It is Shakespeare's first and most verbal comedy, thin on action and plot and believed to have been originally written for a small group of intellectuals rather than the public. Its abundant wordplay is heavy with rhymes, puns and references increasingly obscure to current audiences. And finally, unlike his other comedies, it doesn't end with happy weddings for all. Roger Rees, however, has surmounted those obstacles.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1999 | JAN BRESLAUER
To countless theatergoers, he will always be the title character in "The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby," the landmark 8 1/2-hour Royal Shakespeare Company production of the early 1980s that garnered its star Olivier and Tony awards for best actor, as well as an Emmy nomination. Others know him as Robin Colcord on the TV series "Cheers," or from his many feature films. Yet Roger Rees' greatest role, as his 25 years with the RSC attest, may well be that of team player.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1990 | IRV LETOFSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The producers of "Cheers" set out last summer to search for Rebecca's love interest. A pivotal role. As one gets a great award--an Oscar, a Pulitzer, a Nobel Prize--the highest reward in the legend of "Cheers" is Rebecca, who hasn't had sex in three years! And the winner was . . . not Sam Malone (as played by Ted Danson), who has been in heat for her every Thursday night on NBC since "Backseat Becky" (as played by Kirstie Alley) took over managership of the bar in 1987. No, the real winner was .
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1989 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
Axiomatic, my dear Watson: Count on Tom Stoppard to be clever. The first act of Stoppard's "Hapgood," the spy thriller that opened Wednesday at the Doolittle Theatre, is too clever by half--so clever that you never figure out what's going on. His second act is another story. The fog lifts, the sun comes out and all that plot, counterplot, subplot and overplot clear and coalesce--enough, anyway, so the characters at last take shape and we can actually begin to tell the good guys from the bad. Maybe.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
The Old Globe's new artistic director, Barry Edelstein, is a noted Shakespearean, and its 2013-14 season, the first he's picked, will give extra emphasis to the Bard, beyond the separate summer series that typically offers at least two Shakespeare plays in the outdoor theater that's part of the Old Globe complex in San Diego's Balboa Park. Edelstein will direct “The Winter's Tale” (Feb. 8-March 4, 2014), the first indoor Shakespeare play at the Old Globe since a 2001 staging of “A Midsummer Night's Dream.” And he's giving Shakespeare a new collaborator -- deceased Southern California-raised rocker Jeff Buckley -- in “The Last Goodbye,” (Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Russian playwright Aleksandr Galin has arrived at Florida State University to teach classes and help stage the April 6 English-language premiere of his play, "The Roof." "The Roof" is the first play about contemporary college life in Russia to be performed outside the Soviet Union. Galin follows Broadway producer Joseph Papp and Tony Award-winning British actor Roger Rees as FSU's 1989 Hoffman Eminent Scholar.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 1989
The cast for the American premiere of Tom Stoppard's "Hapgood" has been set. Roger Rees, who will re-create the role he originated in the London production, stars with Simon Jones, Judy Davis, Richard Lawson and James Lancaster. The Ahmanson production will open April 12 at the James A. Doolittle Theatre in Hollywood. Low-priced previews begin April 1. Information: (213) 410-1062.
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