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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2001 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roger Snoble, the top executive of the Dallas transit agency, Wednesday was named the new head of Los Angeles County's Metropolitan Transportation Authority and given a salary of $295,000 a year. By all accounts, Snoble, who has run the Dallas Area Rapid Transit since 1994, was the top choice of the MTA governing board from the moment he showed an interest in the job. The biggest question seemed to be whether the 56-year-old executive could agree with the board on pay.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2009 | Steve Hymon
Art Leahy, whose mother and father helped run Los Angeles' celebrated streetcars and who himself once worked as a bus driver, was approved Thursday as the new chief executive of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Leahy, currently the top transit official in Orange County, will soon take the reins of one of the nation's largest transportation agencies, with a $3.4-billion budget, 9,775 full- and part-time employees and nearly 486 million boardings on its buses and trains last year.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2001 | KURT STREETER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roger Snoble, who won praise for turning Dallas' mass-transit agency around, ventures into a more vexing world Monday when he takes over as chief executive of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Snoble, 56, succeeds Julian Burke, the 74-year-old corporate turnaround specialist who ended four years in charge of the MTA last week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 2008 | Steve Hymon
Affable, mellow and mustachioed, Roger Snoble has mostly flown below the radar for the last seven years as chief executive of the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority, one of the nation's largest mass transit operators. Snoble, 63, announced last week his intent to retire after a successor is chosen, most likely in the next few months. That, in effect, creates a vacancy atop an agency that provides more than 1.5 million transit rides each weekday, has an annual $3.
OPINION
April 15, 2008
Re "Nunez wants MTA chief ousted," April 11 The article about Roger Snoble, head of the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority, and Assembly Speaker Fabian Nunez points to the distribution of Proposition 1B transportation funds. The last item mentioned -- which was, to this voter, the most outrageous -- was a disbursement of $97 million to build a railroad bridge on private railroad property. This hocus-pocus is reminiscent of the early days of California, when Sacramento and the Southern Pacific Railroad were almost partners.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2009 | Steve Hymon
Art Leahy, whose mother and father helped run Los Angeles' celebrated streetcars and who himself once worked as a bus driver, was approved Thursday as the new chief executive of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Leahy, currently the top transit official in Orange County, will soon take the reins of one of the nation's largest transportation agencies, with a $3.4-billion budget, 9,775 full- and part-time employees and nearly 486 million boardings on its buses and trains last year.
OPINION
May 1, 2007
Re "Is 86 cents a ride really too much?" Opinion, April 27 Roger Snoble, the chief executive officer of the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority, asserts that county taxpayers have been heavily subsidizing Metro riders. I'm skeptical. This statement ignores many of the indirect costs of individual car use, leaving us with a faulty picture of who's really being subsidized. If we take into account the costs of lack of parking availability, traffic congestion and. most important, air pollution illnesses and global warming, the equation starts to look a little different.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2008 | Patrick McGreevy, Times Staff Writer
Saying Southern California has been shortchanged on money for transportation projects, Assembly Speaker Fabian Nunez called Thursday for the resignation of Roger Snoble as head of the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Nunez, a Democrat from Los Angeles, reacted angrily to a California Transportation Commission decision Thursday to provide five Southern California counties with $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 2008 | Steve Hymon
Affable, mellow and mustachioed, Roger Snoble has mostly flown below the radar for the last seven years as chief executive of the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority, one of the nation's largest mass transit operators. Snoble, 63, announced last week his intent to retire after a successor is chosen, most likely in the next few months. That, in effect, creates a vacancy atop an agency that provides more than 1.5 million transit rides each weekday, has an annual $3.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2003 | Caitlin Liu, Times Staff Writer
On the fifth day of a walkout that has hobbled Los Angeles County's transit system, leaders of the striking mechanics union sat in a hotel conference room watching television as Metropolitan Transportation Authority officials struggled to reach a deal with another union. Leaders of the Amalgamated Transit Union clustered around a small TV set someone had brought from home to pass time during stalled negotiations at the Sheraton Suites Fairplex in Pomona.
OPINION
April 15, 2008
Re "Nunez wants MTA chief ousted," April 11 The article about Roger Snoble, head of the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority, and Assembly Speaker Fabian Nunez points to the distribution of Proposition 1B transportation funds. The last item mentioned -- which was, to this voter, the most outrageous -- was a disbursement of $97 million to build a railroad bridge on private railroad property. This hocus-pocus is reminiscent of the early days of California, when Sacramento and the Southern Pacific Railroad were almost partners.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2008 | Patrick McGreevy, Times Staff Writer
Saying Southern California has been shortchanged on money for transportation projects, Assembly Speaker Fabian Nunez called Thursday for the resignation of Roger Snoble as head of the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Nunez, a Democrat from Los Angeles, reacted angrily to a California Transportation Commission decision Thursday to provide five Southern California counties with $1.
OPINION
May 1, 2007
Re "Is 86 cents a ride really too much?" Opinion, April 27 Roger Snoble, the chief executive officer of the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority, asserts that county taxpayers have been heavily subsidizing Metro riders. I'm skeptical. This statement ignores many of the indirect costs of individual car use, leaving us with a faulty picture of who's really being subsidized. If we take into account the costs of lack of parking availability, traffic congestion and. most important, air pollution illnesses and global warming, the equation starts to look a little different.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2001 | KURT STREETER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roger Snoble, who won praise for turning Dallas' mass-transit agency around, ventures into a more vexing world Monday when he takes over as chief executive of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Snoble, 56, succeeds Julian Burke, the 74-year-old corporate turnaround specialist who ended four years in charge of the MTA last week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2001 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roger Snoble, the top executive of the Dallas transit agency, Wednesday was named the new head of Los Angeles County's Metropolitan Transportation Authority and given a salary of $295,000 a year. By all accounts, Snoble, who has run the Dallas Area Rapid Transit since 1994, was the top choice of the MTA governing board from the moment he showed an interest in the job. The biggest question seemed to be whether the 56-year-old executive could agree with the board on pay.
OPINION
October 1, 2007
Re "The value of pork," editorial, Sept. 23 Increasing the transparency of the congressional earmarking process is a step in the right direction, as the editorial suggests. However, there is an important distinction to be made between narrowly drawn, poorly vetted earmarks pushed by a member of Congress versus projects that have undergone intense scrutiny and evaluation by the federal government through an established process.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2002 | KURT STREETER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The head of a group of officials studying ways for the western San Gabriel Valley to split from the Metropolitan Transportation Authority defected Wednesday, announcing that he is leaving to take a top position with the massive county transit agency. Jack Gabig, for 12 years the head of Montebello Bus Lines, has been a proponent of the breakaway, known as "zoning": an effort to improve bus service by cutting ties with the MTA.
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