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Roger Tory Peterson

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NEWS
August 1, 1996 | From Associated Press
Roger Tory Peterson, a modern-day John James Audubon who published internationally popular field guides for bird-watchers, has died at 87. Peterson, who died Sunday after suffering a mild stroke several months ago, combined artistic talent with a lifelong scientific interest in birds. During his 60-year career, he wrote, illustrated and edited 15 easy-to-use birding books that sold millions of copies and were translated into at least 12 languages.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2008 | Sue Horton
Peterson Field Guide to Birds of North America Roger Peterson Houghton Mifflin: 532 pp., $26 -- Smithsonian Field Guide to the Birds of North America Ted Floyd Collins: 512 pp., $24.95 Picking a birding field guide is a little like picking a spouse. You have to find it attractive, of course, but that's just not enough for the long haul. You need something smart, reliable. Something that won't fail you when you need it most. Something compact enough to carry on a long hike but comprehensive enough to help you identify an unfamiliar bird when you're 10 miles out on a trail with nobody to ask for help.
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NEWS
May 9, 1990 | BOB SIPCHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The old bird-watcher approached the young naturalist, and politely asked why he had arranged a dozen buckets of mud on a turnout beside the Back Bay estuary in Newport Beach. The young guy, whose name tag read Orange County Department of Environmental Field Study, explained that, soon, a busload of schoolchildren would arrive. Giggling and gasping, they would explore the black ooze with their fingers and therein learn about the delicate web of life in the salt marsh.
NEWS
August 1, 1996 | From Associated Press
Roger Tory Peterson, a modern-day John James Audubon who published internationally popular field guides for bird-watchers, has died at 87. Peterson, who died Sunday after suffering a mild stroke several months ago, combined artistic talent with a lifelong scientific interest in birds. During his 60-year career, he wrote, illustrated and edited 15 easy-to-use birding books that sold millions of copies and were translated into at least 12 languages.
NEWS
October 27, 1985 | BRYAN BRUMLEY, Associated Press and
A century and a half after they were painted, the birds of John James Audubon still look ready to tweet, quack, gobble, honk or hoot, and fly right off the page. Audubon, born 200 years ago in the Caribbean to a French sea captain and his Creole mistress, spent much of the first quarter of the 19th Century studying and sketching the birds of the newly independent United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2008 | Sue Horton
Peterson Field Guide to Birds of North America Roger Peterson Houghton Mifflin: 532 pp., $26 -- Smithsonian Field Guide to the Birds of North America Ted Floyd Collins: 512 pp., $24.95 Picking a birding field guide is a little like picking a spouse. You have to find it attractive, of course, but that's just not enough for the long haul. You need something smart, reliable. Something that won't fail you when you need it most. Something compact enough to carry on a long hike but comprehensive enough to help you identify an unfamiliar bird when you're 10 miles out on a trail with nobody to ask for help.
NEWS
November 12, 1998 | In the Garden ROBERT SMAUS, TIMES GARDEN EDITOR
You wouldn't think that where you put a birdbath would make all that much difference. When ours was in front, it was tucked under a climbing rose next to a small eucalyptus. It seemed like a good spot and, in fact, looked very good there. A nearly tame scrub jay frequently bathed in it, so vigorously, in fact, that we had to refill it every day, but most of the time the bath just sat there, not attracting birds like it was supposed to.
NEWS
October 30, 1988 | DARREN DOPP, Associated Press
Roger Tory Peterson, artist and bird lover, started a "revolution" 60 years ago in the hilly meadows and woods surrounding this small city in upstate New York. A walk in the woods hasn't been the same since. It was here that Peterson found the inspiration for an epic work, "A Field Guide to the Birds," a book that revolutionized nature study. It took ornithology out of the laboratory and made the feathered world in the treetops more accessible to the common man.
TRAVEL
July 13, 1997 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
KINGBIRD HIGHWAY: The Story of a Natural Obsession That Got a Little Out of Hand by Kenn Kaufman (Houghton Mifflin, $23). WILD AMERICA: The Legendary Story of Two Great Naturalists on the Road by Roger Tory Peterson and James Fisher (Mariner, $14, paperback, illustrated). Here we have yet another way to divide the world into us and them. But before you decide you belong with "them" and turn this page for something else to read, you might bear with "us" for a minute.
NEWS
May 9, 1990 | BOB SIPCHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The old bird-watcher approached the young naturalist, and politely asked why he had arranged a dozen buckets of mud on a turnout beside the Back Bay estuary in Newport Beach. The young guy, whose name tag read Orange County Department of Environmental Field Study, explained that, soon, a busload of schoolchildren would arrive. Giggling and gasping, they would explore the black ooze with their fingers and therein learn about the delicate web of life in the salt marsh.
NEWS
October 27, 1985 | BRYAN BRUMLEY, Associated Press and
A century and a half after they were painted, the birds of John James Audubon still look ready to tweet, quack, gobble, honk or hoot, and fly right off the page. Audubon, born 200 years ago in the Caribbean to a French sea captain and his Creole mistress, spent much of the first quarter of the 19th Century studying and sketching the birds of the newly independent United States.
OPINION
December 25, 2003
Now in its 104th year, the National Audubon Society's Christmas Bird Count is a holiday tradition, its bevy of binoculars as sure a sign of winter as menorahs and wreaths. Between Dec. 14 and Jan. 5, tens of thousands of volunteers, mostly in the United States but also in Canada, Latin America and the Pacific Islands, fan out to assigned areas and count all the birds they see in a single day. What better way to forget a perplexing terror alert?
OPINION
December 25, 1988
The Audubon Society's Christmas bird count in Orange County keeps setting records, and Gerald L. Tolman is not sure whether it is in spite or or because of urbanization. Last year coastal Orange County would have tied Freeport, Tex., with a winning count in the United States of 215 species, but headquarters disallowed a ringneck pheasant on grounds that somebody must have imported the bird.
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