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Roger Tory Peterson

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1990 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Along the 800 block of South Broadway in downtown Los Angeles, opinion was divided last week about the winged creatures that have been swirling around the upper reaches of buildings, cluttering the evening sky in dark fluttering clouds. "They get started about 5:30 and go on 'til late at night, thousands of them," security guard Dwayne Albert said authoritatively. "And they ain't birds." He was certain: They're bats. "They're small.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1990 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The head of the San Diego Natural History Museum has been fired, board members announced Wednesday. Director Hal Mahan, who held the post for 2 1/2 years, had come under fire from his senior staff, many of whom expressed their displeasure in a March letter to the museum board that accused Mahan of incompetence. The letter said that Mahan "acted in a reckless and uninformed manner." Mahan, who lives in Jamul, was unavailable for comment Wednesday.
NEWS
September 3, 1986 | ANN HEROLD
--A record-breaking balloon flight by a Dutch couple and their pilot turned out to be a truly crashing success. Fifty-one hours and 14 minutes after it left St. John's, Newfoundland, the gondola of the Dutch Viking balloon slammed to the ground at 30 m.p.h., bounced and flipped over in a wheat field in Almere, the Netherlands. But the emergency landing was still the successful culmination of a record-breaking transatlantic balloon flight that was 30 hours faster than the previous crossing.
TRAVEL
July 17, 2011
A nice little piece on the Lucille Ball museum ["A World of Funny" by Jay Jones, July 10] but Jones might also have noted that in and about the area is the resort town of Bemus Point on Lake Chautauqua, the Chautauqua Institution itself, across the lake, and the home and museum of Roger Tory Peterson, whose "Birds of North America" is the standard reference book on the subject. I'm not from the area but passed through there a number of years ago and … discovered that there were a number of interesting things besides the Lucy museum, which, by the way, is terrific.
NEWS
November 12, 1998 | In the Garden ROBERT SMAUS, TIMES GARDEN EDITOR
You wouldn't think that where you put a birdbath would make all that much difference. When ours was in front, it was tucked under a climbing rose next to a small eucalyptus. It seemed like a good spot and, in fact, looked very good there. A nearly tame scrub jay frequently bathed in it, so vigorously, in fact, that we had to refill it every day, but most of the time the bath just sat there, not attracting birds like it was supposed to.
NEWS
January 26, 1999 | REGINA MARLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you're stuck in an elevator when the Big One hits, you couldn't do much better than be stranded there with Anne Lamott. In a pinch, even her latest book, a collection of funny, warm and sagacious personal essays that first appeared in the online magazine Salon, could get you through the dark hours.
TRAVEL
January 31, 1988 | JUDITH MORGAN, Morgan, of La Jolla, is a magazine and newspaper writer
"Why Antarctica?" I was asked before I left to spend the holidays down south. My answer was vague. "I planned to go 10 years ago," I began, "but I broke my foot on a ragged stone step in Mexico and had to cancel." "But why Antarctica?" people persisted. "Adventure," I replied, as if life were a quiz show with right answers.
NEWS
April 9, 1996 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
I put a bird feeder in my front yard, and soon had daily presentations outside my window of almost nonstop singing, frantic dancing and fighting. It was as if a stock company of "West Side Story" had moved into my yard. Not having been supplied with a program guide, I had no idea just what cast members of the bird world were paying me a visit.
NEWS
November 20, 1988 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
Sitting down to dinner on Thursday, those giving thanks might remember Sarah Josepha Hale, author of the children's poem "Mary Had a Little Lamb." It was Hale--editor, poet, novelist and one of the most influential women in 19th-Century America--who persuaded Abraham Lincoln that Thanksgiving should be declared a national holiday.
NEWS
January 3, 1989 | LEE DEMBART
Islands in a Far Sea: Nature and Man in Hawaii by John L. Culliney (Sierra Club Books: $24.95; 352 pages, illustrated) It's hard to spend time in Hawaii without falling in love with the place. Even the excesses of tourism and the booboisie cannot obliterate the special character of the islands, which only begins with their climate. Isolation is the hallmark of the islands and the key to their natural history.
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