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Roger Von Butow

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 2000
In your Oct. 1 editorial "A Step Toward Clean Beaches," you failed to include several missing pieces of the urban runoff puzzle, namely: (1) Waste treatment plants do not have the capacity to handle the total volume of all of the inland cities. Highly developed watersheds preclude all but the coastal communities, meaning over 90% of the low-flow nuisance water flowing year round remains "toxic soup." (2) The detritus and chemical composition of runoff overwhelm treatment plants. These facilities were designed for human waste--the bacteria in their holding chambers are for organic materials.
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OPINION
September 29, 2002
Re "Blowing Smoke," Sept. 22: The Mission Viejo City Council is coming up with new regulations on cigarette smoking in public, and on its Web site boasts that, according to the FBI, it is the "safest city in America." What is obscured is that this city contaminates the Aliso and San Juan creeks with pathogenic bacterial counts equivalent to those found inside a toilet bowl during use, according to Orange County Health Department testing. It has refused to implement new regulations on urban runoff and is spending hundreds of thousands from local coffers to litigate.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2000
Re "Hail Laguna's Taxi Experiment," (Orange County Perspective, Dec. 3): Lagunatics. That's what we call ourselves, and we're proud of it. Living here for almost 30 years, I've come to realize that sometimes it's what Laguna Beach doesn't have that makes it special. Using OCTA funds that could be spent elsewhere is one issue, but encouraging a visual blight like subsidized taxi service will create an ersatz sophistication some of us deem unnecessary. Roving taxis could result in an altered traffic flow, with the taxis cruising and being flagged over in dense traffic a la New York.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2001
Underground and unnoticed, the potential multi-city calamities awaiting California due to rolling blackouts cannot be ignored: namely, the pump stations our waste-water systems rely upon. Every town has a series of these devices, similar to a ship's bilge pump, to assist the millions of gallons of sewage on their way for treatment. Gravity can do only so much, and the city of Laguna Beach provides a shocking example of how little time and money has been invested in anticipation of these energy fluctuations over the years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2001
Underground and unnoticed, the potential multi-city calamities awaiting California due to rolling blackouts cannot be ignored: namely, the pump stations our waste-water systems rely upon. Every town has a series of these devices, similar to a ship's bilge pump, to assist the millions of gallons of sewage on their way for treatment. Gravity can do only so much, and the city of Laguna Beach provides a shocking example of how little time and money has been invested in anticipation of these energy fluctuations over the years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2000
Sharon Stern and Erin Aiello's article on environmental laws (Orange County Voices, Oct. 22) fails to address the realities of implementation. Neither AB 411, nor the unmentioned SB 709 of July 1999, will alter dramatically the behavior of recreational users. These two are not "strong environmental laws," as typified by these researchers. In the case of AB 411, the emphasis is on testing and "right to know" (presence of pollution) concepts that leave the monitoring aspects in the hands of the local health department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2001
The fiasco of major sewage problems in Huntington Beach should be the final clarion call necessary for Orange County residents. People in the areas that have admittedly archaic storm drain and waste water pipes have every right to be alarmed. Older cities with these antiquated and undersized systems, like Laguna Beach, have continuing problems that will demand big amounts of funding to rectify. More citizens have learned what environmentalists already perceived--sewage (waste water)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2001
Re "Beach Without Pier," March 18: The Aliso pier should have never been put there in the first place. It split a perfectly seamless beach in half making it act like more of an eyesore than a recreation center. It also was hazardous to swimmers or surfers who drifted near it. A new pier wouldn't be worth the time, money or effort put into it, not to mention any sequoias that might have to be chopped down to build a new one. I've already grown accustomed to the beach without a pier, and I like it better.
OPINION
September 29, 2002
Re "Blowing Smoke," Sept. 22: The Mission Viejo City Council is coming up with new regulations on cigarette smoking in public, and on its Web site boasts that, according to the FBI, it is the "safest city in America." What is obscured is that this city contaminates the Aliso and San Juan creeks with pathogenic bacterial counts equivalent to those found inside a toilet bowl during use, according to Orange County Health Department testing. It has refused to implement new regulations on urban runoff and is spending hundreds of thousands from local coffers to litigate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2000 | Sue Doyle, (949) 574-4204
Residents interested in learning more about beach contamination are welcome to take a tour of Aliso Creek today, said Roger von Butow, founder of the Clean Water Now! Coalition. Von Butow and representatives from the Clean Aliso Creek Assn. will lead the tour, which begins at 10 a.m. in the parking lot at Aliso and Wood Canyons Wilderness Park, on Alicia Parkway, near Aliso Creek Road. The tour will continue along Aliso Creek through Mission Viejo. Sturdy shoes are recommended.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2001
Re "Beach Without Pier," March 18: The Aliso pier should have never been put there in the first place. It split a perfectly seamless beach in half making it act like more of an eyesore than a recreation center. It also was hazardous to swimmers or surfers who drifted near it. A new pier wouldn't be worth the time, money or effort put into it, not to mention any sequoias that might have to be chopped down to build a new one. I've already grown accustomed to the beach without a pier, and I like it better.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2001
The fiasco of major sewage problems in Huntington Beach should be the final clarion call necessary for Orange County residents. People in the areas that have admittedly archaic storm drain and waste water pipes have every right to be alarmed. Older cities with these antiquated and undersized systems, like Laguna Beach, have continuing problems that will demand big amounts of funding to rectify. More citizens have learned what environmentalists already perceived--sewage (waste water)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 2000
Re "Hail Laguna's Taxi Experiment," (Orange County Perspective, Dec. 3): Lagunatics. That's what we call ourselves, and we're proud of it. Living here for almost 30 years, I've come to realize that sometimes it's what Laguna Beach doesn't have that makes it special. Using OCTA funds that could be spent elsewhere is one issue, but encouraging a visual blight like subsidized taxi service will create an ersatz sophistication some of us deem unnecessary. Roving taxis could result in an altered traffic flow, with the taxis cruising and being flagged over in dense traffic a la New York.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2000
Sharon Stern and Erin Aiello's article on environmental laws (Orange County Voices, Oct. 22) fails to address the realities of implementation. Neither AB 411, nor the unmentioned SB 709 of July 1999, will alter dramatically the behavior of recreational users. These two are not "strong environmental laws," as typified by these researchers. In the case of AB 411, the emphasis is on testing and "right to know" (presence of pollution) concepts that leave the monitoring aspects in the hands of the local health department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 2000
In your Oct. 1 editorial "A Step Toward Clean Beaches," you failed to include several missing pieces of the urban runoff puzzle, namely: (1) Waste treatment plants do not have the capacity to handle the total volume of all of the inland cities. Highly developed watersheds preclude all but the coastal communities, meaning over 90% of the low-flow nuisance water flowing year round remains "toxic soup." (2) The detritus and chemical composition of runoff overwhelm treatment plants. These facilities were designed for human waste--the bacteria in their holding chambers are for organic materials.
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