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Roger Wood

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BUSINESS
September 15, 1989 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
David Sendler, for many years the editor most responsible for the journalistic content of TV Guide, resigned Thursday after what insiders described as a dramatic change in the direction of the magazine since it was acquired last year by Rupert Murdoch. Publicly, Murdoch had made assurances that he would not change TV Guide when he bought it and parent Triangle Publications last November for $3 billion.
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BUSINESS
September 15, 1989 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
David Sendler, for many years the editor most responsible for the journalistic content of TV Guide, resigned Thursday after what insiders described as a dramatic change in the direction of the magazine since it was acquired last year by Rupert Murdoch. Publicly, Murdoch had made assurances that he would not change TV Guide when he bought it and parent Triangle Publications last November for $3 billion.
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BUSINESS
November 25, 1987 | United Press International
For much of the country, holiday preparations have barely started, but at the Aerostar International balloon plant in South Dakota, the seasonal frenzy is in full swing. Aerostar's employees are scrambling to put the finishing touches on the last of four large inflatable figures that will fill the sky as the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade meanders through the skyscrapers along the streets of Manhattan.
NEWS
July 10, 1994 | JOHN CURRAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The freckle-faced kindergarten student reached into a pailful of diamondback terrapins and pulled one out. Gingerly, he stepped to the water's edge in a saltwater marsh and lowered it in, waving goodby as the turtle entered its own habitat for the first time. "It felt like he was going to bite me," 5-year-old Matthew Bridgeman said. "Now he's swimming all the way out there," he said, pointing to the winding river that snakes through the marsh. After him, 24 other children paraded two by two to the same spot, each releasing a turtle and watching it disappear into the blue waters of the marsh.
NEWS
June 14, 1985
Eugenia Chandris, author of "The Venus Syndrome," said goodby to her New York pals the other night at a dinner at Mortimer's co-hosted by friend Iris Love, the archeologist. (Eugenia took off for London and another series of parties soon after.) The pals included Dr. and Mrs. Jonas Salk, food writers Gael Greene and Florence Fabricant, the New York Post's Roger Wood with New Woman magazine's publisher Pat Miller, Peter Getty of the oil-rich Getty clan, the Charles Danas, C.Z. Guest, and D. D.
SPORTS
May 10, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Chicago Cub pitcher Kerry Wood's next scheduled start is Monday against the Arizona Diamondbacks in Phoenix, and all eyes will be on him because he is coming off a record-tying 20-strikeout performance against Houston. Madison Avenue will be paying particular attention. Like fellow Texans Nolan Ryan and Roger Clemens, Wood conveys a quiet earthiness that could play well in all markets.
NATIONAL
September 12, 2009 | Mark Z. Barabak
When President Obama delivered this week's big healthcare speech, Dick Armey watched in his apartment near Capitol Hill. Or, rather, he watched until he "couldn't take it anymore" and went off to work on his wife's balky computer. It's no surprise that Armey tuned out a president he holds in less than high regard. What voter mandate? "He got lucky," the former Republican House leader said. "Anybody with the Democratic nomination was going to win." Nothing Obama said was going to sway him. "He has no understanding nor appreciation for the way a private economy works," said Armey, a free-marketer to set Adam Smith's heart aflutter.
NEWS
September 15, 1985 | ROBERT GILLETTE, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Union on Saturday ordered the expulsion of 25 British Embassy staffers, journalists and businessmen in retaliation for Britain's expulsion two days earlier of 25 Soviet citizens accused of spying.
NEWS
January 8, 2001 | JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With California's unstable electrical system threatening temporary blackouts that could cost them hundreds of millions of dollars in the months ahead, Silicon Valley businesses are resorting to every trick in the book to make sure they stay humming. Companies that make chips or run other firms' Web sites are cutting deals to keep most of their power in times of crisis. Engineers are designing state-funded software to help others drop electricity use on demand.
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