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May 30, 2009 | Barbara Demick
A few days after Roh Moo-hyun committed suicide, I went digging around in my son's toy chest to find the small plush doll of the former South Korean president I'd bought shortly after he was inaugurated. It was one of many souvenirs for sale at the time -- T-shirts, mugs, clocks, figurines that dangled from cellphones. The one I bought had a suction cup that allowed it to be hung on the inside of a car window. My son, 3 at the time, was delighted to have his first male doll.
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WORLD
May 30, 2009 | Barbara Demick
A few days after Roh Moo-hyun committed suicide, I went digging around in my son's toy chest to find the small plush doll of the former South Korean president I'd bought shortly after he was inaugurated. It was one of many souvenirs for sale at the time -- T-shirts, mugs, clocks, figurines that dangled from cellphones. The one I bought had a suction cup that allowed it to be hung on the inside of a car window. My son, 3 at the time, was delighted to have his first male doll.
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WORLD
December 5, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
For the first time in 49 years, South Korean legislators overrode a presidential veto and voted overwhelmingly for an independent corruption inquiry that President Roh Moo Hyun had tried to block. The allegations involving three former Roh aides already are under investigation by state prosecutors.
WORLD
May 24, 2009 | John M. Glionna
He entered the national stage as Mr. Clean, a tireless crusader in a country rife with high-level corruption.
WORLD
December 15, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
In a political gamble, South Korean President Roh Moo Hyun offered to quit if a probe finds that his campaign accepted large sums of illegal funds. A spokesman said Roh would submit his resignation if the amount taken by his campaign is more than 10% of the sum taken by the opposition Grand National Party, which accepted more than $40 million, mostly from conglomerates. There are ongoing investigations of campaign financing by both parties.
WORLD
March 2, 2003 | From Associated Press
In his first major policy speech since taking office, South Korean President Roh Moo Hyun warned Saturday of a possible "calamity" from the standoff over North Korea's nuclear program if there is no quick and peaceful resolution. His speech came on the same day that 100,000 people jammed a Seoul plaza to condemn Pyongyang and support the U.S. troop presence in the South. The North warned through its KCNA news agency that nuclear war could break out.
WORLD
May 15, 2004 | From Times Wire Services
South Korean President Roh Moo Hyun apologized today for causing a two-month impeachment crisis and pledged to take a back seat in politics. He said he would tackle the country's economic problems without damaging growth. In a live broadcast amid drizzle in front of his Blue House office, Roh said the Constitutional Court may have ruled on Friday to overturn parliament's March 12 impeachment vote, but that this had not absolved him of political and moral responsibility.
WORLD
May 1, 2009 | Ju-min Park and John M. Glionna
South Koreans looked on with curiosity and disgust Thursday as former President Roh Moo-hyun met with federal prosecutors investigating his role in a suspected bribery scandal. People had little choice but to tune in: Roh's every move as he and his aides made a five-hour drive to the capital was captured by news helicopters hovering above the ex-president's motorcade. There were minute-by-minute updates on TV, radio and online.
WORLD
October 13, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
South Korea's beleaguered President Roh Moo Hyun proposed today what would amount to a recall election to be held around Dec. 15 and promised to resign if the public did not give him a vote of confidence. Such a recall is unusual in Korean politics, but political experts said they believed that Roh has the authority as president to call for a special election.
WORLD
December 20, 2002 | Sonni Efron, Times Staff Writer
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration sought Thursday to banish any perceptions that a frowned-upon candidate had won the South Korean presidency, stressing its eagerness to work with President-elect Roh Moo Hyun to improve U.S.-South Korean relations. "The United States continues to have very strong and good relations with the people and the government of South Korea," presidential spokesman Ari Fleischer said. "We're friends and we're allies....
WORLD
May 1, 2009 | Ju-min Park and John M. Glionna
South Koreans looked on with curiosity and disgust Thursday as former President Roh Moo-hyun met with federal prosecutors investigating his role in a suspected bribery scandal. People had little choice but to tune in: Roh's every move as he and his aides made a five-hour drive to the capital was captured by news helicopters hovering above the ex-president's motorcade. There were minute-by-minute updates on TV, radio and online.
WORLD
April 28, 2009 | John M. Glionna
Ex-President Roh Moo-hyun will enter familiar territory for a former South Korean head of state this week when he is grilled by prosecutors over his alleged role in a national bribery scandal. The onetime human rights lawyer and judge is the third South Korean president since 1995 to face a corruption probe after leaving office. He is suspected of soliciting $6 million in bribes from a shoemaking magnate that were allegedly paid to his wife and son.
WORLD
October 2, 2007 | Bruce Wallace, Times Staff Writer
Riding dreams of Korean reunification and hoping to nudge history forward, South Korean President Roh Moo- hyun journeyed to the North Korean capital, Pyongyang, today to open a three-day summit that drew the North's reclusive leader, Kim Jong Il, into a rare appearance before a global audience.
WORLD
November 18, 2006 | James Gerstenzang, Times Staff Writer
President Bush failed this morning to win South Korea's commitment to intercept North Korean vessels as part of the U.S.-led effort to stop Pyongyang's atomic weapons program and prevent the spread of its nuclear technology. But South Korean President Roh Moo-hyun did express support for the effort to counter Pyongyang, and the nation has already agreed to other parts of the plan. U.S.
WORLD
July 14, 2005 | Sonni Efron and Barbara Demick, Times Staff Writers
Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice scored a major victory in recent days when North Korea agreed to return to international negotiations on dismantling its nuclear weapons programs. And so did one of the Bush administration's critics, South Korean President Roh Moo-hyun.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2004 | K. Connie Kang, Times Staff Writer
South Korean President Roh Moo-hyun makes his first trip to Los Angeles today, and his appeal highlights a generation gap in Koreatown. He has few fans among older Korean Americans, who are suspicious of his left-leaning politics and attempts to cultivate diplomatic relations with Communist North Korea. But he has emerged as a hero of sorts among some in the younger generation, who see him as an inspirational figure. In addition to a traditional speech on Korea-U.S.
WORLD
February 26, 2003 | Sonni Efron and Barbara Demick, Times Staff Writers
Secretary of State Colin L. Powell met Tuesday with newly inaugurated South Korean President Roh Moo Hyun in what both sides said was a successful effort to patch up months of tension and misunderstandings between the U.S. and one of its closest allies. Powell said Roh had agreed to the American position that countries most threatened by North Korea's nuclear ambitions should take part in multilateral talks to resolve the problem.
WORLD
November 18, 2006 | James Gerstenzang, Times Staff Writer
President Bush failed this morning to win South Korea's commitment to intercept North Korean vessels as part of the U.S.-led effort to stop Pyongyang's atomic weapons program and prevent the spread of its nuclear technology. But South Korean President Roh Moo-hyun did express support for the effort to counter Pyongyang, and the nation has already agreed to other parts of the plan. U.S.
WORLD
May 15, 2004 | From Times Wire Services
South Korean President Roh Moo Hyun apologized today for causing a two-month impeachment crisis and pledged to take a back seat in politics. He said he would tackle the country's economic problems without damaging growth. In a live broadcast amid drizzle in front of his Blue House office, Roh said the Constitutional Court may have ruled on Friday to overturn parliament's March 12 impeachment vote, but that this had not absolved him of political and moral responsibility.
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