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August 19, 1992 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Tale of Springtime" (Laemmle's Sunset 5), the latest film by France's 73-year-old master Eric Rohmer, and the start of his new four-film seasonal cycle, has a springlike clarity. But it also seethes with that slightly desperate, boiling unease that can come after the vernal equinox. There's nothing sluggish or sultry about Rohmer's springtime. Outside, the air of Paris or Fountainebleau is crisp and achingly clear.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan
Eric Rohmer, a former film critic who became one of France's most respected filmmakers and was internationally known for movies such as "My Night at Maud's" and "Claire's Knee," died Monday in Paris. He was 89. Rohmer's death was announced by his producer, Margaret Menegoz. Relatives said he was hospitalized a week ago but offered no further explanation, according to Agence France-Presse. French President Nicolas Sarkozy called the writer-director a "great auteur who will continue to speak to us and inspire us for years to come."
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1989 | KEVIN THOMAS
The art of Eric Rohmer is that of inviting us to perceive the universe in a conversation between two people. For more than 25 years, the French writer-director has made films in which people mainly sit around and talk, yet as we listen to their everyday conversations we discover all manner of cosmic implication. This occurs not merely because of what is being said but because we have been beguiled by his people.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2010 | By Glenn Kenny
Despite being almost universally acknowledged as a master of film, the French director Eric Rohmer, who came to prominence as a member of the so-called New Wave of the late '50s and early '60s (although he was about 10 years older than many of its most famous members, Jean-Luc Godard and François Truffaut among them) arguably stands as one of the most misunderstood of great directors. Rohmer, who died Monday in Paris at age 89, came to international prominence with the films he made under the rubric "Six Moral Tales" between 1962 and 1972.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1988 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
To be content with the doings of the bright, earnest and infinitely self-involved young lovers whom Eric Rohmer so obviously loves in his "Boyfriends and Girlfriends" (Westside Pavilion), you must adjust yourself to an exquisitely calibrated surface with not a great deal beneath. It's like the world's most civilized reflecting pool, and Rohmer's trick is that he never breaks the surface tension, never once allows his characters to get in over their depth.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1986 | Associated Press
"Summer," a film by French director Eric Rohmer about a young woman's isolation, Wednesday won the Golden Lion prize at the film festival here. "Summer" (a review of the film is on Page 2) also won a separate award from the International Catholic Film Organization. An Italian and a Soviet entry tied for second place.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2010 | By Glenn Kenny
Despite being almost universally acknowledged as a master of film, the French director Eric Rohmer, who came to prominence as a member of the so-called New Wave of the late '50s and early '60s (although he was about 10 years older than many of its most famous members, Jean-Luc Godard and François Truffaut among them) arguably stands as one of the most misunderstood of great directors. Rohmer, who died Monday in Paris at age 89, came to international prominence with the films he made under the rubric "Six Moral Tales" between 1962 and 1972.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1994 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The French respect the quirky workings of the human heart more than any other people, and among the French filmmakers, the keenest observer may be Eric Rohmer, whose "A Tale of Winter" finds him at his scintillating best, never wiser or funnier. This time out he tackles that eternal question: What do women want from men? In this instance, the second in his current cycle of "Tales of the Four Seasons," the question proves especially thorny.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2008 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
One of the fathers of France's New Wave -- he was editor of the seminal "Cahiers du Cinema" from 1956 to 1963 -- Eric Rohmer made his first film in 1959 and just recently completed a movie at the age of 88. Known for his wry, cerebral comedies dealing with intimate relationships and misunderstandings, Rohmer's films are a feast of clever dialogue and smart acting. The Los Angeles County Museum of Art is paying homage to this master filmmaker beginning Friday with its "The Tale of Eric Rohmer" retrospective.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1999 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 79, director Eric Rohmer ("Claire's Knee," "Pauline at the Beach") is one of the grand old men of the French New Wave. That revolutionary group of intellectual and mostly young cinephiles and film critics (Francois Truffaut, Claude Chabrol, Jean-Luc Godard, et al.) shattered the stale conventions of French filmmaking 40 years ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2009 | BETSY SHARKEY, FILM CRITIC
There is a street in the Pointe Courte neighborhood of Sete, a seaside village in Southern France, that is named for Agnes Varda, the French filmmaker who lived there in the '40s with her mother, brothers and sisters in a sailboat anchored to the quay while her father was off at war. It looks like an ordinary street, and in truth it is. And yet it isn't.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2008 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
One of the fathers of France's New Wave -- he was editor of the seminal "Cahiers du Cinema" from 1956 to 1963 -- Eric Rohmer made his first film in 1959 and just recently completed a movie at the age of 88. Known for his wry, cerebral comedies dealing with intimate relationships and misunderstandings, Rohmer's films are a feast of clever dialogue and smart acting. The Los Angeles County Museum of Art is paying homage to this master filmmaker beginning Friday with its "The Tale of Eric Rohmer" retrospective.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2002 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
How did old master Eric Rohmer come to make the technologically inventive "The Lady and the Duke"? As the 82-year-old writer-director explained to an interviewer, "I like to get out from time to time." Given that Rohmer is one of the grand old men of the French cinema, who's been making films like "My Night at Maud's," "Claire's Knee" and the more recent "Autumn's Tale" for more than half a century, you might think that getting out would involve nothing more taxing than a trip to the local cafe.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1999 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 79, director Eric Rohmer ("Claire's Knee," "Pauline at the Beach") is one of the grand old men of the French New Wave. That revolutionary group of intellectual and mostly young cinephiles and film critics (Francois Truffaut, Claude Chabrol, Jean-Luc Godard, et al.) shattered the stale conventions of French filmmaking 40 years ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1999 | KRISTIN HOHENADEL, Kristin Hohenadel is a regular contributor to Calendar
Eric Rohmer doesn't go to the movies anymore. "When you're young you need to go see a lot of films," says the 79-year-old writer-director. "It helps you to find a style. Now I prefer to go out into the world, to find stories inspired by real life." The prolific, independent-minded auteur has been writing and directing those stories for 40 years, producing dozens of films, including such memorable ones as "Claire's Knee" (1971), "Pauline at the Beach" (1983) and "The Green Ray" (1985).
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1994 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The French respect the quirky workings of the human heart more than any other people, and among the French filmmakers, the keenest observer may be Eric Rohmer, whose "A Tale of Winter" finds him at his scintillating best, never wiser or funnier. This time out he tackles that eternal question: What do women want from men? In this instance, the second in his current cycle of "Tales of the Four Seasons," the question proves especially thorny.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan
Eric Rohmer, a former film critic who became one of France's most respected filmmakers and was internationally known for movies such as "My Night at Maud's" and "Claire's Knee," died Monday in Paris. He was 89. Rohmer's death was announced by his producer, Margaret Menegoz. Relatives said he was hospitalized a week ago but offered no further explanation, according to Agence France-Presse. French President Nicolas Sarkozy called the writer-director a "great auteur who will continue to speak to us and inspire us for years to come."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1992 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
'Tale of Springtime" (Laemmle's Sunset 5), the latest film by France's 73-year-old master Eric Rohmer, and the start of his new four-film seasonal cycle, has a spring-like clarity. But it also seethes with that slightly desperate, boiling unease that can come after the vernal equinox. There's nothing sluggish or sultry about Rohmer's springtime. Outside, the air of Paris or Fountainebleau is crisp and achingly clear.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1992 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Tale of Springtime" (at the Hillcrest Cinemas), the latest film by France's 73-year-old master Eric Rohmer, and the start of his new four-film seasonal cycle, has a springlike clarity. But it also seethes with that slightly desperate, boiling unease that can come after the vernal equinox. There's nothing sluggish or sultry about Rohmer's springtime. Outside, the air of Paris or Fountainebleau is crisp and achingly clear.
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