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Rohmer

ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1999 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 79, director Eric Rohmer ("Claire's Knee," "Pauline at the Beach") is one of the grand old men of the French New Wave. That revolutionary group of intellectual and mostly young cinephiles and film critics (Francois Truffaut, Claude Chabrol, Jean-Luc Godard, et al.) shattered the stale conventions of French filmmaking 40 years ago.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1999 | KRISTIN HOHENADEL, Kristin Hohenadel is a regular contributor to Calendar
Eric Rohmer doesn't go to the movies anymore. "When you're young you need to go see a lot of films," says the 79-year-old writer-director. "It helps you to find a style. Now I prefer to go out into the world, to find stories inspired by real life." The prolific, independent-minded auteur has been writing and directing those stories for 40 years, producing dozens of films, including such memorable ones as "Claire's Knee" (1971), "Pauline at the Beach" (1983) and "The Green Ray" (1985).
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1992 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
'Tale of Springtime" (Laemmle's Sunset 5), the latest film by France's 73-year-old master Eric Rohmer, and the start of his new four-film seasonal cycle, has a spring-like clarity. But it also seethes with that slightly desperate, boiling unease that can come after the vernal equinox. There's nothing sluggish or sultry about Rohmer's springtime. Outside, the air of Paris or Fountainebleau is crisp and achingly clear.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2009 | BETSY SHARKEY, FILM CRITIC
There is a street in the Pointe Courte neighborhood of Sete, a seaside village in Southern France, that is named for Agnes Varda, the French filmmaker who lived there in the '40s with her mother, brothers and sisters in a sailboat anchored to the quay while her father was off at war. It looks like an ordinary street, and in truth it is. And yet it isn't.
NEWS
September 10, 1986 | Associated Press
"Summer," a film by French director Eric Rohmer about a young woman's isolation, won the Golden Lion prize at the Venice Film Festival today. Rohmer, 66, is one of the founders of France's New Wave cinema and best known for "My Night at Maude's" and "Claire's Knee."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1992 | MARK CHALON SMITH
Golden West College's fall film series: Tonight: "La Femme Infidele" (1969), directed by Claude Chabrol. Oct. 2: "Pauline at the Beach" (1983), directed by Eric Rohmer. Oct. 9: "That Man from Rio" (1964), directed by Philippe De Broca. Oct. 16: "Summer" (1986), directed by Eric Rohmer. All screenings will be at 7:30 p.m. in the Forum II theater on the campus, 15744 Golden West St., Huntington Beach. Tickets: $3 and $3.50. Information: (714) 891-3991.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1996 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 76, France's Eric Rohmer is one of the world's oldest active film directors but remains one of the youngest in spirit. There could be no better proof of this than his beguiling, souffle-light "Rendezvous in Paris." At once fresh and timeless, as romantic as its title yet tempered by Gallic irony, this exquisite trifle takes a bemused look at the roles fate and coincidence play in the affairs of the heart.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1999 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Though you wouldn't know it from Hollywood's kids 'r us obsessions, directors actually can improve as they advance in age. The droll and delicious "Autumn Tale" is the 22nd feature in 79-year-old writer-director Eric Rohmer's four-decade career, and besides being one of his wisest and most enjoyable films, it also has the light-fingered vigor and panache more chronologically youthful directors are not always able to muster.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1988 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
"My Night at Maud's." "Claire's Knee." Media/Cinematheque Collection. $59.95. In the great "Ma Nuit Chez Maud"--the fourth of Eric Rohmer's "Six Moral Tales"--a bachelor (Jean-Louis Trintignant), who is both a devout Catholic and a Don Juan, is torn between two women: the piquant Maud (Francoise Fabian), with whom he has a memorable all-night flirtation, and a haunting woman (Marie-Christine Barrault) whom he glimpses from afar at church.
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