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WORLD
September 7, 2009 | Kate Connolly
Even if an election was not looming in Germany, the involvement of the nation's military in an airstrike in Afghanistan that left scores dead and wounded would have intensified political debate about the German role in the region. The fact that Friday's attack, which both U.S. and Afghan authorities say killed some civilians as well as militants, occurred three weeks before Germans go to the polls has magnified its effect -- one commentator likened it to a "political fragmentation bomb."
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BUSINESS
April 8, 2014 | By David Pierson and Tiffany Hsu
Come grilling season, expect your sirloin steak to come with a hearty side of sticker shock. Beef prices have reached all-time highs in the U.S. and aren't expected to come down any time soon. Extreme weather has thinned the nation's beef cattle herds to levels last seen in 1951, when there were about half as many mouths to feed in America. "We've seen strong prices before but nothing this extreme," said Dennis Smith, a commodities broker for Archer Financial Services in Chicago.
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NATIONAL
February 14, 2010 | By Richard Fausset
In this Southern city famed for its science and technology, residents are coming to grips with perhaps the most unsettling fact in Friday's campus shooting: The suspect was not a student but a professor. And, it was learned Saturday that she had fatally shot her brother in 1986. Amy Bishop, 45, a neurobiologist and assistant professor at the University of Alabama in Huntsville, was arrested shortly after the incident and charged with capital murder. She is accused of killing three of her colleagues and injuring three more during a faculty meeting.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2014 | By David Ng and Mike Boehm
There's nothing opera buffs like better than a climactic death scene. But the one that San Diego Opera scripted for itself has gone over so badly that its leaders are now trying to write a new ending. Last month's sudden announcement that the opera would shut down just short of its 50th anniversary next year raised an outcry from patrons and company members alike, who said they didn't have any advance warning of the company's escalating financial troubles. A faction of the board, which has close to 60 members, has succeeded in getting the closure postponed by two weeks, to April 29, in hopes that last-ditch pleas for donations can keep the lights on. More than 20,000 people have signed an online petition calling for the opera to be saved.
NATIONAL
August 9, 2010 | By Nicholas Riccardi, Los Angeles Times
A few months ago, Colorado symbolized the GOP's hopes for a tremendously successful November. Its candidates were favorites to take the governor's mansion and a Senate seat in the state where Barack Obama was nominated for president two years ago. Now Colorado may stand for something different for the Republican Party: how its rightward tilt could complicate its ability to win seats this fall. A small-business owner with no political background is poised to upset a former congressman in the GOP's gubernatorial primary Tuesday.
WORLD
April 14, 2010 | By Batsheva Sobelman
Is Anat Kam an Israeli hero or a traitor? She is accused of secretly copying more than 2,000 military documents, many of them classified, while serving mandatory duty as a soldier from 2005 to 2007, and then releasing some to the press. One document appeared to show that the Israeli army tried to circumvent court orders meant to rein in its use of targeted killings. Supporters say the 23-year-old Kam, who is on trial at Tel Aviv District Court, acted according to her conscience.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2011 | By Raja Abdulrahim, Los Angeles Times
On a Friday afternoon in October, men in black security T-shirts and matching cargo pants roamed the parking lot and perimeter of the Islamic Center of Northridge as worshipers arrived for weekly prayers. Several Los Angeles Police Department patrol cars were parked nearby as officers kept a watchful eye on a demonstration out front. About 30 men yelled and held up signs. One waved a small American flag as another denounced the mosque's religious leader as a devil. FOR THE RECORD: Valley mosque: An article in the Jan. 31 LATExtra section about a dispute at a San Fernando Valley mosque identified Manzar Qureshi as a former board member at the mosque, the Islamic Center of Northridge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2010 | By Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
An international investigation of alleged misdeeds by Hewlett-Packard executives while the company was headed by Carly Fiorina is roiling the U.S. Senate race in California, where Fiorina is among the front-runners for the Republican nomination. The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, the U.S. Department of Justice, and German and Russian authorities are investigating whether executives with the company paid nearly $11 million in bribes to win a $47.5-million contract in 2003 to sell computers through a German subsidiary to Russian prosecutors, the Wall Street Journal reported last week.
WORLD
April 11, 2012 | By Jonathan Kaiman, Los Angeles Times
CHONGQING, China — Change has come quickly to this sprawling city of 30 million people since the charismatic local party chief, Bo Xilai, was fired last month by the national Communist Party leadership in China's most high-profile political shake-up in 20 years. Signs in public squares now ban gatherings to sing "red songs," a prominent element of Bo's effort to revitalize Mao-era values. Advertising has replaced propaganda messages on television. Bo's supporters say some old problems — be it the nuisance of unwanted leaflets or a bigger issue like prostitution — are creeping back.
WORLD
January 5, 2011 | By Batsheva Sobelman, Los Angeles Times
Big natural gas fields found recently off Israel's coast could be a game-changer for the small country, pumping billions of dollars into the economy. But the prospect of huge profits is igniting a battle to divide the spoils, long before drilling gets underway. A government committee appointed to review Israel's policy on oil and gas resources recommended late Monday more than doubling the government's take of production profits to as much as 62%. Committee Chairman Eytan Sheshinski, a retired Hebrew University economics professor, said the revised rate, which still must be approved by the parliament, would create a "balance between the companies' profitability and the public.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2014 | By Timothy M. Phelps
WASHINGTON - The first time I talked to Anita Hill, she was teaching commercial law in Oklahoma, living in obscurity in the state where she grew up on an isolated farm with 12 siblings. For roughly a week in 1991, I pressed her to tell me what she had told the Senate Judiciary Committee in confidence about Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas, to no avail. She was a very private person and, I can attest, a reluctant witness. Then, when the story of her allegations of sexual harassment did break based on other sources, she was instantly a celebrity or a demon, her life upended.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
Call it a dark farce, human comedy or wartime satire. But however you slice it, the ill-conceived morality tale "A Farewell to Fools" is a bust. Set in the waning days of World War II, the movie involves a group of Romanian villagers attempting to trick the resident fool, Ipu (Gérard Depardieu in hyper-slob mode), into giving up his life in order to save theirs. Unfortunately, the script by Anusavan Salamanian, based on the novel by Titus Popovici (first filmed as 1972's "Then I Sentenced Them All to Death")
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2014 | By Scott Gold
GUADALUPE, Calif. - As a nearby tractor purred to life, Miguel Villagomez picked up his knife and stepped into a furrow of dirt amid thousands of plump heads of cauliflower ready for cutting. "This," the 19-year-old from Michoacán, Mexico, said with a touch of pride, "is my place. " For decades, the lush soil in this corner of California has been tilled largely by immigrants from Latin America, many returning year after year. But that long-standing relationship has encountered unexpected turbulence in recent weeks.
WORLD
January 13, 2014 | Laura King
In the labyrinthine alleyways of this ancient city's Grand Bazaar, currency dealer Sardar Kaya glanced around before making an impromptu confession: Even those like him, who daily turn volatility into profit, wonder if Turkey's biggest corruption scandal in recent memory has become too jarring a ride. "Sure, a crisis like this is good for business, if you are clever enough," he said, lounging against a column in the sprawling market's informal gold-and-currency trading district, where chaotic scenes unfolded last week as the Turkish lira touched an all-time low. "But you can also fall on the wrong side of it. " Many in Turkey are feeling the same way as they try to sort through the implications of a vast and many-tentacled graft inquiry that has jeopardized Turkey's once-thriving economy and shaken the foundations of state control -- most particularly, the near-absolute power that Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has enjoyed for more than a decade.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2013 | By Scott Gold
SANTA YNEZ, Calif. - The Chumash Indians, first seen by explorers along the California coast in the fall of 1542, did not have running water on their tiny, sickle-shaped reservation until the 1960s. Over time, the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians clawed its way to sustainability, and more. The tribe harnessed Depression-era laws of self-governance, state and federal gambling initiatives. A casino opened in 2003. Healthcare is paid for. The tribe foots the bill for any recognized descendant who wants to go to college.
WORLD
October 30, 2013 | By Janet Stobart
LONDON - A plan to regulate the British press as a result of the country's phone-hacking scandal was signed by Queen Elizabeth II on Wednesday despite the objections of publishers who sought a court order to block such a measure. The royal charter approved by the queen and the nation's major political parties calls for the creation of a watchdog group designed to curb the type of abuses revealed by the scandal. The practices include listening to the voicemails of crime victims, celebrities, royal family members and others, such as employees or relatives of people in the news.
WORLD
July 5, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
For months, Britain's scandal over scoop-hungry reporters hacking into the cellphones of celebrities and politicians drew shrugs from the general public, which viewed the affair as a rarified dispute between the rich and famous and those who write about them. Not anymore. Revulsion swept the nation Tuesday amid allegations that a sensationalist tabloid owned by media baron Rupert Murdoch also intercepted and tampered with voicemails left for a kidnapped 13-year-old girl whose body was later found dumped in the woods.
NEWS
August 10, 1992 | From Associated Press
Environmentalists say it's irresponsible, Christians are calling it sacrilegious and the government has gone to court to ban it. But if all goes according to plan, one day next month a 100-foot steel-framed figure of a man, stuffed with 20,000 loaves of bread, will be towed out into the North Sea and sunk. The "National Gift to the Sea" has caused a furor in this seafaring nation that prides itself on its thrift and environmental conscience.
WORLD
October 23, 2013 | By Richard Fausset
MONTERREY, Mexico - It is one of those small, hopeful signs that this traumatized city may be awakening from the nightmare of Mexico's drug wars: Armando Alanis once again feels safe enough to stop off for a late-night nosh at Tacos Los Quiques, a beloved sidewalk food cart. "We couldn't have done this two years ago," Alanis, a 44-year-old poet, said recently as he chowed down on tacos gringas in the dim glow of inner-city streetlights. "It would be wrong not to recognize what we have regained.
BUSINESS
October 15, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn and Andrew Tangel
SAN FRANCISCO - Twitter Inc. is moving full speed ahead with its initial public offering even as the world braces for the possibility of a U.S. debt default that would roil financial markets and hurt the stock's debut. The micro-blogging service said Tuesday that it would list its shares on the New York Stock Exchange, handing a major victory to the Big Board over its rival, the Nasdaq Stock Market. Also, Twitter could kick off its road show to market the IPO to investors in the last week of October, according to a person with knowledge of the matter who spoke on the condition of anonymity because he is not authorized to discuss it publicly.
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