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Roland Clarkson

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1998 | TRACY JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's longer than a 400-page novel and if written out it would stretch for more than a mile. The largest known prime number is so big that Roland Clarkson, the 19-year-old Cal State Dominguez Hills student who found it after secretly running a computer program in the campus computer lab over winter vacation, would need 277 hours to say it. Never mind what the number is--it's 909,526 digits long.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1998 | TRACY JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's longer than a 400-page novel and if written out it would stretch for more than a mile. The largest known prime number is so big that Roland Clarkson, the 19-year-old Cal State Dominguez Hills student who found it after secretly running a computer program in the campus computer lab over winter vacation, would need 277 hours to say it. Never mind what the number is--it's 909,526 digits long.
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March 11, 1998 | K.C. COLE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
In the movie "Good Will Hunting," an impoverished South Boston kid who scrapes by mopping floors at MIT astonishes prize-winning professors with his ability to solve--at a glance--math problems that have stumped the experts. How likely is this scenario? Could a person with no specialized education instantaneously see his way through intellectual thickets impenetrable to the top people in the field? Even if he is a natural-born genius?
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