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Roland Emmerich

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December 10, 1995 | Robert W. Welkos, Robert W. Welkos is a Times staff writer. and
Roland Emmerich was promoting his 1994 hit science-fiction movie "Stargate" when a reporter posed a question: Did he believe in space aliens? When the easygoing German director answered that he did not, the reporter became indignant. "How can you make a movie like 'Stargate' and not believe in aliens?" he asked. "I believe in fantasy," Emmerich replied. "I believe in the great 'What if?' What if aliens showed up?
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
Big spectacle, often of the comic-book variety, has been working at the U.S. multiplex this season. “Man of Steel” was the biggest June opening in history. “Iron Man 3” just hit $400 million in the U.S. So where does that leave a little old-school action? That's the question Sony is asking for “White House Down,” the throwback blow-em-up from “Independence Day" and all-around pyrotechnics maestro Roland Emmerich. PHOTOS: Summer Sneaks 2013 You know the drill by now, though you haven't seen it in a while: A-list actor with a Messiah streak + big, explosive special effects + earthshaking threat + imperiled iconic landmarks = big business (usually)
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
When veteran filmmaker Roland Emmerich was first offered the chance to direct a movie about terrorists taking over the White House, he couldn't believe his luck. "It's such a good idea," Emmerich, the money-minting director of movies such as "2012," said last week at a Culver City editing facility, where he has been holed up polishing his new film, "White House Down. " "I was surprised no one had done it before. " It turns out someone has. Just before. Emmerich's movie, about a wannabe Secret Service agent with a Messiah complex who serendipitously ends up at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. during a fiery terrorist attack, will come out June 28. That's barely three months after the release Friday of Antoine Fuqua's "Olympus Has Fallen" - about a wannabe Secret Service agent with a Messiah complex who serendipitously ends up at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. during a fiery terrorist attack.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2013 | By Daniel Miller
In "White House Down," aspiring Secret Service agent Channing Tatum is tasked with saving the free world -- but he may not fare as well in rescuing the summer box office fortunes of the action movie's distributor, Sony Pictures Entertainment. In what would be a mild upset and Sony's second expensive summer disappointment, "White House Down" is expected to finish behind the weekend's other new release, action comedy "The Heat. " Both films are likely to cede the No. 1 spot to the Walt Disney Co. animated holdover "Monsters University.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2009 | John Horn
There's spirited debate about whether the ancient Maya calendar really predicts much of anything, particularly the world's end in three years. But there's little argument in Hollywood about the accuracy of an even more significant doomsday forecast: "2012" is going to be a blockbuster. Ever since director Roland Emmerich's apocalyptic thriller landed on pre-release audience surveys last Thursday, "2012" and its positive prospects have become a hot topic among movie marketing executives.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2009 | Glenn Whipp
Roland Emmerich has destroyed Los Angeles twice before -- twisters razed the city in "The Day After Tomorrow" and aliens did the honors in "Independence Day" -- but those mondo-destructo efforts pale in comparison to the way Emmerich bids goodbye to Hollywood in his latest apocalyptic nightmare, "2012." Taken from an extremely pessimistic reading of the Mayan calendar, "2012" is a Noah's Ark story that sees the end of the world as we know it, including a 10.9 earthquake that sends Southern California sliding into the sea. There is one shard of hope, though: Apparently, it is possible, if you drive fast enough, to make it from Brentwood to the Santa Monica Airport during the Big One and leave on a jet plane before being swallowed into the earth.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"White House Down" is a hoot and a half, a shameless popcorn entertainment that is preposterous and diverting in just about equal measure. This story of "the worst day this country ever had" - a roughly 12-hour period when an armed paramilitary group blows up the Capitol and takes over the White House - is very much something you get a kick out of against your better judgment. In fact, if the amount of disbelief that needs to be suspended to enjoy this movie could be turned into dollars, it would pay off the national debt with some money left over to buy star Channing Tatum, director Roland Emmerich and screenwriter James Vanderbilt a round of beers.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2009 | By Lily Kuo
"Welcome to the People's Republic of China," declares an officer of the People's Liberation Army as he crisply salutes an American novelist (played by John Cusack) who has just fled the United States, which -- like much of the world -- has been destroyed by an environmental catastrophe. It is a line that has thrilled thousands of Chinese filmgoers who have made writer-director Roland Emmerich's "2012" among the most popular Hollywood films of all time on the Chinese mainland. The plot has helped: In Emmerich's ("Independence Day," "The Day After Tomorrow")
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2004
Film festival: Roland Emmerich, the director of "Independence Day" and "The Day After Tomorrow," will head the jury at the Berlin Film Festival in February.
NEWS
January 24, 2008
Heath Ledger: The caption with a photo of Heath Ledger on Wednesday's front page said that Mel Gibson had directed the actor, and an article inside Section A about Ledger's death stated that Gibson cast him in "The Patriot," suggesting that Gibson had directed the film. The 2000 film was directed by Roland Emmerich, who was responsible for the casting of Ledger. Ledger did not appear in a film directed by Gibson.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"White House Down" is a hoot and a half, a shameless popcorn entertainment that is preposterous and diverting in just about equal measure. This story of "the worst day this country ever had" - a roughly 12-hour period when an armed paramilitary group blows up the Capitol and takes over the White House - is very much something you get a kick out of against your better judgment. In fact, if the amount of disbelief that needs to be suspended to enjoy this movie could be turned into dollars, it would pay off the national debt with some money left over to buy star Channing Tatum, director Roland Emmerich and screenwriter James Vanderbilt a round of beers.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
MONTREAL - On a warm fall day in a scruffy suburb of this Canadian city, some familiar sights appear. French-language road signs note estimated distances in kilometers. Beret-wearing soldiers stand guard. A restaurant offers a poutine special. And then, suddenly, some less familiar ones: large sections of the White House, built to scale and scattered across several neighborhoods of the city. The elegant South Portico, fronted by a lawn big enough for a couple of military helicopters.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
When veteran filmmaker Roland Emmerich was first offered the chance to direct a movie about terrorists taking over the White House, he couldn't believe his luck. "It's such a good idea," Emmerich, the money-minting director of movies such as "2012," said last week at a Culver City editing facility, where he has been holed up polishing his new film, "White House Down. " "I was surprised no one had done it before. " It turns out someone has. Just before. Emmerich's movie, about a wannabe Secret Service agent with a Messiah complex who serendipitously ends up at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. during a fiery terrorist attack, will come out June 28. That's barely three months after the release Friday of Antoine Fuqua's "Olympus Has Fallen" - about a wannabe Secret Service agent with a Messiah complex who serendipitously ends up at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. during a fiery terrorist attack.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik
EXCLUSIVE: Jamie Foxx and Ken Jeong  have both subverted ethnic stereotypes to great comedic effect. Now the two are teaming up. In an unusual, if informal, partnership, Foxx and Jeong have each agreed to star in movies written by the other, says Foxx, the former “In Living Color” star. Foxx has agreed to take a lead role in a new movie Jeong will produce called “After Prom.” The buddy comedy  is about two old high school friends, one “a jock and the other a cool dude,” as Foxx puts it, who must now steer their teenage children through their own prom gantlet.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2011 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
A statue of William Shakespeare in the playwright's hometown of Stratford-Upon-Avon was covered by a sheet Tuesday in protest; a debate enlivened a New York cultural festival; American university campuses have played host to surprisingly prickly encounters between professors and filmmakers. "One professor in Berkeley called us 'characters,'" said Roland Emmerich, the movie director at the center of the controversy. Emmerich's film, "Anonymous," depicts Shakespeare, played by Rafe Spall, as a barely literate actor providing a front for a brilliant nobleman, Edward de Vere, the Earl of Oxford (Rhys Ifans)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2009 | By Lily Kuo
"Welcome to the People's Republic of China," declares an officer of the People's Liberation Army as he crisply salutes an American novelist (played by John Cusack) who has just fled the United States, which -- like much of the world -- has been destroyed by an environmental catastrophe. It is a line that has thrilled thousands of Chinese filmgoers who have made writer-director Roland Emmerich's "2012" among the most popular Hollywood films of all time on the Chinese mainland. The plot has helped: In Emmerich's ("Independence Day," "The Day After Tomorrow")
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik
EXCLUSIVE: Jamie Foxx and Ken Jeong  have both subverted ethnic stereotypes to great comedic effect. Now the two are teaming up. In an unusual, if informal, partnership, Foxx and Jeong have each agreed to star in movies written by the other, says Foxx, the former “In Living Color” star. Foxx has agreed to take a lead role in a new movie Jeong will produce called “After Prom.” The buddy comedy  is about two old high school friends, one “a jock and the other a cool dude,” as Foxx puts it, who must now steer their teenage children through their own prom gantlet.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2004 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
Have we lost our appetite for cinematic destruction -- for watching our world shatter into smithereens? I ask because in two of his previous films, "Independence Day" and "Godzilla," Roland Emmerich laid waste to the world -- leveling its great cities and zapping the White House -- with the unbounded glee of a rampaging puppy.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2009 | Glenn Whipp
Roland Emmerich has destroyed Los Angeles twice before -- twisters razed the city in "The Day After Tomorrow" and aliens did the honors in "Independence Day" -- but those mondo-destructo efforts pale in comparison to the way Emmerich bids goodbye to Hollywood in his latest apocalyptic nightmare, "2012." Taken from an extremely pessimistic reading of the Mayan calendar, "2012" is a Noah's Ark story that sees the end of the world as we know it, including a 10.9 earthquake that sends Southern California sliding into the sea. There is one shard of hope, though: Apparently, it is possible, if you drive fast enough, to make it from Brentwood to the Santa Monica Airport during the Big One and leave on a jet plane before being swallowed into the earth.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2009 | John Horn
There's spirited debate about whether the ancient Maya calendar really predicts much of anything, particularly the world's end in three years. But there's little argument in Hollywood about the accuracy of an even more significant doomsday forecast: "2012" is going to be a blockbuster. Ever since director Roland Emmerich's apocalyptic thriller landed on pre-release audience surveys last Thursday, "2012" and its positive prospects have become a hot topic among movie marketing executives.
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