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Roland Joffe

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1999 | STEVE HOCHMAN
With his fifth film, Roland Joffe, the English director behind "The Killing Fields," "The Mission" and "The Scarlet Letter," turns to a quadruple-indemnity thriller in his new "Goodbye Lover," featuring Patricia Arquette, Don Johnson, Ellen DeGeneres and a Greek chorus in the form of songs from "The Sound of Music." Joffe, 51, is now in Paris shooting "Vatel" with Uma Thurman and Tim Roth. PUBLIC IMAGE: "I cast Don Johnson and people say, 'But we know what Don does.'
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2009 | Associated Press
Roland Joffe knows his latest film will be controversial but says it is not meant as a response to "The Da Vinci Code," whose bad guys were members of the Opus Dei movement of the Roman Catholic Church. Joffe is in Argentina directing a biopic of Opus Dei founder Jose Maria Escriva de Balaguer, who sided with Francisco Franco during the Spanish Civil War and allegedly spoke positively of Adolf Hitler. The church dismissed the controversies before Escriva was canonized as a saint. Opus Dei is financing the film, "There Be Dragons," but Joffe said it isn't a propaganda project.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1989 | SHELLEY LIST, The author is a journalist, novelist, television writer/producer and a member of the board of Operation California, a medical relief group. She was supervising producer on "Cagney and Lacey" and most recently co-created with partner Jonathan Estrin the pilot "Sisters" for CBS. and
On Aug. 3, I arrived in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, as a member of a delegation that showed "The Killing Fields" to the very people whose suffering is depicted in the 1984 film. Among those invited were Roland Joffe, the director of the film, and Sydney Schanberg, the former New York Times journalist who was the protagonist of the story. Joffe had never been here, having shot the film in Thailand, and Schanberg was returning for the first time since he was evacuated in 1975.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On April 10, 1671, according to the beginning of Roland Joffe's sumptuous yet scathing "Vatel," the Prince de Conde received a letter from a key aide to Louis XIV stating that the Sun King would accept an invitation for a visit to his estate, Chantilly--that "he wants no fuss, merely the simple pleasures of life in the country. In other words, if you value His Majesty's favor you will set no limit to the extravagance and ingenuity of the festivities."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1999
Film director Roland Joffe breaks new ground on MTV with a 30-part series called "Undressed." Theme: sexual experiences of all variety.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2009 | Associated Press
Roland Joffe knows his latest film will be controversial but says it is not meant as a response to "The Da Vinci Code," whose bad guys were members of the Opus Dei movement of the Roman Catholic Church. Joffe is in Argentina directing a biopic of Opus Dei founder Jose Maria Escriva de Balaguer, who sided with Francisco Franco during the Spanish Civil War and allegedly spoke positively of Adolf Hitler. The church dismissed the controversies before Escriva was canonized as a saint. Opus Dei is financing the film, "There Be Dragons," but Joffe said it isn't a propaganda project.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1992 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Unlike directors whose films you love to hate, Roland Joffe makes movies you hate not being able to love. While many filmmakers with his kind of access to major-league funding are content turning out mind-numbing pabulum, Joffe functions as a kind of restless cinematic conscience.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1989 | Pat H. Broeske \f7
Whose bomb is it, anyway? And why? "We're sitting here, trying to figure out what went wrong," admitted Roland Joffe, director/co-writer of "Fat Man and Little Boy." Joffe's pic--about the making of the A-bomb--was long considered a prestige project starring Paul Newman as Gen. Leslie R. Groves, whose views collided with those of physicist J. Robert Oppenheimer. Joffe is irked by some critics who thumbs-downed the film. But the public hasn't lined up, either.
NEWS
March 28, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first glance, it seemed like just another Sunday morning in Mir Bahar Ghat, a teeming and gritty cobblestoned market street in the heart of an urban hell. Flanked by the stench of disease and human waste, laborers and children scrubbed themselves in a poisoned well. A dozen filthy pigs nibbled their way through a steaming heap of yesterday's garbage.
NEWS
July 25, 1999 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Since 1984, British director Roland Joffe has made such serious dramatic films as "The Killing Fields," "The Mission," "Fat Man and Little Boy," and "City of Joy." So who knew that underneath all that somberness, the two-time Oscar nominee is really a wild and crazy guy? Joffe gets to reveal his lighter side as the executive producer of MTV's sexy new daily series, "Undressed," which premieres Monday on the cable network.
NEWS
July 25, 1999 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Since 1984, British director Roland Joffe has made such serious dramatic films as "The Killing Fields," "The Mission," "Fat Man and Little Boy," and "City of Joy." So who knew that underneath all that somberness, the two-time Oscar nominee is really a wild and crazy guy? Joffe gets to reveal his lighter side as the executive producer of MTV's sexy new daily series, "Undressed," which premieres Monday on the cable network.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1999
Film director Roland Joffe breaks new ground on MTV with a 30-part series called "Undressed." Theme: sexual experiences of all variety.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1999 | STEVE HOCHMAN
With his fifth film, Roland Joffe, the English director behind "The Killing Fields," "The Mission" and "The Scarlet Letter," turns to a quadruple-indemnity thriller in his new "Goodbye Lover," featuring Patricia Arquette, Don Johnson, Ellen DeGeneres and a Greek chorus in the form of songs from "The Sound of Music." Joffe, 51, is now in Paris shooting "Vatel" with Uma Thurman and Tim Roth. PUBLIC IMAGE: "I cast Don Johnson and people say, 'But we know what Don does.'
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1995 | CHUCK CRISAFULLI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It sounds like a tragic tale of Hollywood hubris--a director gets his hands on a literary classic, and soon a stark rendering of defeated love is pumped into a steamy romance. The novel's dignified heroine is given a nude bathing scene and--gasp!--the ending is changed. And English professors across the land bow their heads and sob. Controversy had already begun to swirl around director Roland Joffe's interpretation of "The Scarlet Letter" well before it opened Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1992 | KRISTINE McKENNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"I want this film to touch people's emotions but some people don't want their emotions touched," says British director Roland Joffe of the difficulties his new film, "City of Joy," may face in finding an audience. Set amidst the brutal squalor of the slums of Calcutta, "City of Joy" is an unabashed celebration of hope and fraternity--sentiments Joffe believes are unfortunately out of vogue.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1992 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Unlike directors whose films you love to hate, Roland Joffe makes movies you hate not being able to love. While many filmmakers with his kind of access to major-league funding are content turning out mind-numbing pabulum, Joffe functions as a kind of restless cinematic conscience.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1992 | KRISTINE McKENNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"I want this film to touch people's emotions but some people don't want their emotions touched," says British director Roland Joffe of the difficulties his new film, "City of Joy," may face in finding an audience. Set amidst the brutal squalor of the slums of Calcutta, "City of Joy" is an unabashed celebration of hope and fraternity--sentiments Joffe believes are unfortunately out of vogue.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On April 10, 1671, according to the beginning of Roland Joffe's sumptuous yet scathing "Vatel," the Prince de Conde received a letter from a key aide to Louis XIV stating that the Sun King would accept an invitation for a visit to his estate, Chantilly--that "he wants no fuss, merely the simple pleasures of life in the country. In other words, if you value His Majesty's favor you will set no limit to the extravagance and ingenuity of the festivities."
NEWS
March 28, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first glance, it seemed like just another Sunday morning in Mir Bahar Ghat, a teeming and gritty cobblestoned market street in the heart of an urban hell. Flanked by the stench of disease and human waste, laborers and children scrubbed themselves in a poisoned well. A dozen filthy pigs nibbled their way through a steaming heap of yesterday's garbage.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1989 | Pat H. Broeske \f7
Whose bomb is it, anyway? And why? "We're sitting here, trying to figure out what went wrong," admitted Roland Joffe, director/co-writer of "Fat Man and Little Boy." Joffe's pic--about the making of the A-bomb--was long considered a prestige project starring Paul Newman as Gen. Leslie R. Groves, whose views collided with those of physicist J. Robert Oppenheimer. Joffe is irked by some critics who thumbs-downed the film. But the public hasn't lined up, either.
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