Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRoland Lajoie
IN THE NEWS

Roland Lajoie

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 15, 1988
U.S. and Soviet teams monitoring compliance with the new medium-range missile treaty have detected no violations so far, a U.S. official told reporters at a Pentagon briefing. The inspection program, which began July 1, "has been amazingly free of complications," said Brig. Gen. Roland Lajoie, who directs 200 U.S. inspectors in the American On-Site Inspection Agency. "The (missile) count has been absolutely as advertised."
ARTICLES BY DATE
Advertisement
NEWS
July 24, 1985 | From a Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Union has assured the United States that the ramming of a U.S. military vehicle by a Soviet army truck in East Germany was an accident and not an intentional provocation, a U.S. official said Tuesday. "There are indications that the incident may not have been intentional," Pentagon spokesman Fred Hoffman said. He made it clear that the indications came from discussions with the Soviets. He added, however, that the United States is "still looking into the matter." U.S.
NEWS
July 17, 1985 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
A Soviet army truck rammed a U.S. Army vehicle in East Germany last weekend and injured an American officer, the Pentagon disclosed Tuesday. The incident prompted the second U.S. protest in four months over Soviet abuse of American servicemen in the German Communist state. Pentagon spokesman Fred Hoffman said that Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger "is very disturbed" about the incident, which followed the fatal shooting last March 24 of Maj. Arthur D. Nicholson Jr. by a Soviet sentry.
NEWS
July 16, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
A Soviet army truck rammed a U.S. vehicle carrying three members of the American liaison mission to East Germany, injuring a U.S. officer in the second U.S.-Soviet incident there in four months, the Pentagon said today. The United States "views the matter very seriously" and has protested to Soviet military officials over the weekend incident, Pentagon spokesman Fred Hoffman said. Col.
NEWS
June 14, 1988 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
The newly created U.S. On-Site Inspection Agency, the government body largely responsible for ensuring compliance with the new U.S.-Soviet medium-range missile treaty, Monday conducted an extensive dry run for the first Soviet inspection of an American missile facility.
NEWS
May 22, 1985 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
In a white-washed building that once housed offices of Germany's World War II Luftwaffe, Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger met Tuesday with the widow of slain U.S. Army Maj. Arthur D. Nicholson Jr. and told her that the Soviets "simply don't respond in a way that civilized people do." Weinberger spent 6 1/2 hours in this divided city--his first visit here as secretary. To the dismay of some U.S.
NEWS
March 31, 1985 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
The United States and the Soviet Union agreed Saturday that military commanders from both sides should meet to discuss the killing of an American major by a Soviet sentry in East Germany and to consider ways to prevent such incidents. The agreement was reached at a State Department conference between Secretary of State George P. Shultz and Soviet Ambassador Anatoly F. Dobrynin and was announced three hours before the slain officer, Maj. Arthur D. Nicholson Jr.
NEWS
September 9, 1988 | JOHN BALZAR and NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writers
In a few minutes of fire and smoke, the United States destroyed two Pershing missiles Thursday, marking the start of a three-year process that eventually will eliminate 689 American nuclear rockets under a historic arms control treaty with the Soviet Union. Under the terms of the Intermediate Nuclear Forces treaty signed by President Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev last December, the superpowers will destroy all of their nuclear missiles with ranges between 300 and 3,400 miles.
NEWS
January 26, 1988 | JOHN M. BRODER and ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writers
The Pentagon is establishing a new Defense Inspection Agency as the primary office to assure compliance with the recently signed intermediate nuclear forces treaty with the Soviet Union, Secretary of Defense Frank C. Carlucci said Monday. The agency will spend between $180 million and $200 million this fiscal year to begin the task of carrying out the extensive verification provisions, Carlucci told the Senate Armed Services Committee during a ratification hearing on the treaty.
NEWS
May 28, 1988 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
As the Senate voted to approve the new U.S.-Soviet intermediate-range missile treaty, special teams of American experts were completing their preparations Friday for the unprecedented task of making sure that all the Soviet weapons covered by the landmark pact are destroyed and that no new ones are produced. "I'm about as optimistic as you can be when you're embarking on something that's never been done before," said Army Brig. Gen.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|