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Rolandas Paksas

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WORLD
January 6, 2003 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
A flamboyant former prime minister, Rolandas Paksas, upset Lithuania's popular incumbent President Valdas Adamkus in voting Sunday. "I was always saying I would win," Paksas told supporters as early returns showed him with a strong lead. "I know the problems of this country, and I know how to solve them." With votes from nearly all polling stations in the Baltic nation tallied by early today, Paksas, 46, leader of the right-wing Liberal Democrats, had 55%. Adamkus, 76, a former U.S.
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WORLD
April 7, 2004 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
Lithuanian President Rolandas Paksas was removed from office Tuesday for his support of a businessman with alleged links to Russian organized crime, leaving the Baltic republic in political upheaval on the eve of its entry into the European Union. In a close vote, members of Parliament approved the impeachment of the 47-year-old former stunt pilot, who acknowledged "mistakes," but insisted that he was a corruption-fighter and victim of "a system that ... is more powerful than you can imagine."
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WORLD
April 7, 2004 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
Lithuanian President Rolandas Paksas was removed from office Tuesday for his support of a businessman with alleged links to Russian organized crime, leaving the Baltic republic in political upheaval on the eve of its entry into the European Union. In a close vote, members of Parliament approved the impeachment of the 47-year-old former stunt pilot, who acknowledged "mistakes," but insisted that he was a corruption-fighter and victim of "a system that ... is more powerful than you can imagine."
WORLD
January 6, 2003 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
A flamboyant former prime minister, Rolandas Paksas, upset Lithuania's popular incumbent President Valdas Adamkus in voting Sunday. "I was always saying I would win," Paksas told supporters as early returns showed him with a strong lead. "I know the problems of this country, and I know how to solve them." With votes from nearly all polling stations in the Baltic nation tallied by early today, Paksas, 46, leader of the right-wing Liberal Democrats, had 55%. Adamkus, 76, a former U.S.
NEWS
June 21, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Lithuanian Prime Minister Rolandas Paksas resigned after a key member of his year-old coalition government in this ex-Soviet republic withdrew its support. The move was widely expected after the center-left New Union, which formed the core of the government with the premier's center-right Liberal Union, on Monday called on Paksas to resign, saying it opposed his plans to cut taxes and quickly privatize Lithuania's giant utilities.
WORLD
December 5, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Lithuanian President Rolandas Paksas, facing likely impeachment over allegations of links to Russian mobsters, bowed to pressure not to embarrass a key ally by canceling a visit to Washington. Paksas had been due to meet President Bush on Monday. The accusations have rattled Lithuania just months before it joins the European Union and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.
WORLD
December 23, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
President Valdas Adamkus, who guided the former Soviet republic of Lithuania to expected membership in the European Union and NATO, failed to win 50% of the vote in his bid for reelection. Adamkus will face former Prime Minister Rolandas Paksas on Jan. 5. Adamkus, a former U.S. citizen, enjoyed high approval ratings. The 76-year-old helped garner invitations into the EU and North Atlantic Treaty Organization earlier this year but failed to overcome a large field of candidates and low turnout.
WORLD
April 1, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Lithuania's Constitutional Court set the stage for President Rolandas Paksas' impeachment by ruling that he violated the constitution when he arranged citizenship for a native Russian. Paksas, 48, who 14 months ago won a surprise election victory, arranged citizenship for businessman Yuri Borisov, a campaign contributor who police assert is linked to the Russian mafia.
WORLD
December 1, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
As thousands marched in the capital demanding his resignation, Lithuanian President Rolandas Paksas calmly vowed not to quit and rejected accusations that his office has links to Russian mobsters. "I'm calm as a Belgian," a defiant Paksas said at a game of tennis on the outskirts of Vilnius. A secret service report said in October that Paksas' office and some aides were linked to Russian gangsters, touching off a political scandal in the Baltic country.
WORLD
November 23, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Thousands of protesters rallied near President Rolandas Paksas' office in Lithuania's capital, Vilnius, demanding his resignation amid allegations that he has ties with a businessman involved with organized crime. Police kept the crowd of about 4,000 away from about 400 Paksas supporters. No clashes or arrests were reported, and the crowds dispersed peacefully in the evening. A parliamentary commission was established to investigate alleged presidential ties with organized crime.
NEWS
February 15, 2001 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A court convicted a 93-year-old former security police commander Wednesday of taking part in the mass murder of more than 200,000 Jews in Lithuania during World War II. It was the first time since the collapse of the Soviet Union that a local collaborator has been convicted of a Holocaust crime in one of the now-independent former Soviet republics.
WORLD
December 2, 2003 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
A Lithuanian Parliament investigation concluded Monday that President Rolandas Paksas' office has links to organized crime that "menace the national security," prompting new calls for his resignation and a possible impeachment vote. A commission looking into alleged connections between Paksas and the Russian mafia found that the president "has been and is vulnerable" to influence because of his relationships and those of his senior advisors with mobsters.
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