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NEWS
December 3, 1990 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Cummings, the perennially youthful bachelor photographer of the 1950s television series "The Bob Cummings Show," died Sunday at the Motion Picture and Television Hospital in Woodland Hills. Cummings, 80, died of kidney failure and complications of pneumonia, hospital spokeswoman Louella Benson said. The actor, who also was in advanced stages of Parkinson's Disease, was admitted to the hospital Nov. 18.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
April 27, 2014 | Eric Sondheimer
Ever since Granada Hills Kennedy opened in 1971, it has been known to produce lots of baseball-playing brothers. Tagliaferri, Serr, Miranda, Avlas, Kane, Pinto, Ramirez, Sanchez, Bourne - they are just a few of the families that helped propel Kennedy to seven City Section championships. But no brother combination comes close to pulling off what Nick and Estevan Rodriguez did this month in a home game against Granada Hills. Batting third and fourth in the starting lineup, Nick, a senior shortstop, and Estevan, a junior first baseman, hit back-to-back inside-the-park home runs.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2013 | By Reed Johnson
Edgar Quintero swears that he doesn't really know any swaggering narco kingpins. He just impersonates them in his songs. With his bandmates in the group BuKnas de Culiacan, Quintero fires up dance halls from El Paso to East L.A. packed with fist-pumping teenagers and twentysomethings. He's a virtuoso of the narcocorrido genre, accordion-driven, blood-lusting ballads that lionize the exploits of Mexico's brutal drug cartels and their bosses. "With an AK-47 and a bazooka on my shoulder / Cross my path and I'll chop your head off / We're bloodthirsty, crazy and we like to kill," goes one typically sanguinary tune.
TRAVEL
April 27, 2014
The inside viewof Hanalei Just a quick note to say Christopher Reynolds did a great job representing Hanalei ["Rooted in Kauai," April 20]. As a born and raised Kauaian (who grew up on Weke Road), I must say I was surprised to open the paper at my current home in California and see my hometown taking over a full spread. Reynolds did a great job representing the island and calling out all the best restaurants and things to do - exactly the list I've sent to friends looking for Kauai recommendations.
NEWS
December 30, 2013 | By Karin Klein
Saturated fat's bad, bad image - the evil ingredient that supposedly makes people fat and keeps them that way, while clogging our blood vessels and raising our cardiovascular risk - has been getting a bit of a makeover. That shouldn't surprise anyone too much. Just a few years ago, anything but a low-fat diet was considered sure to doom people to a life of obesity. Then studies began finding that “good” fats such as those from olives, nuts and some fish were healthful for us and that people on diets high in refined carbohydrates - so-called high-glycemic diets --lost less weight than those on some diets richer in fats, even when the groups ate the same number of calories.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
Jeffrey Tambor is best known for his delightfully offbeat characters, from the fawning sidekick to Garry Shandling's late-night talk show host on "The Larry Sanders Show" to the head of the dysfunctional Bluth family in the recently revived cult favorite "Arrested Development. " For his latest role, Tambor will get in touch with his feminine side. On a recent September afternoon in the Pasadena hills, Tambor sported long, shoulder-length blonde hair, palazzo pants and chunky jewelry over a white blouse -- the wardrobe favored by his character in "Transparent," in which the paterfamilias reveals to his grown children that he is exploring a new identity as "Maura.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling
Amanda Seyfried may have put it best: "I'm just so sick of my part," she said half in jest of her role as Cossette, but as an explanation for why she put "I Dreamed a Dream" into her karaoke machine and sang Fantine's iconic song in her bedroom. "It wasn't as good as yours," she said with a laugh to Anne Hathaway, who plays the role in "Les Miserables," during the Envelope Screening Series. When asked what other parts they would like to sing, both Hathaway and co-star Hugh Jackman said it would be Inspector Javert's "Stars," sung in the film by Russell Crowe.
NEWS
October 5, 2010
How high is too high when it comes to your blood pressure? A reading of 140/90 and up is considered high. About two-thirds of Americans older than 65 have high blood pressure, and more may experience pre-hypertension. There's no quick and easy way to reduce blood pressure, but a combination of exercise and eating right can help. DASH, or Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension , published by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, outlines specific foods and serving sizes for a 2,000-calorie diet that may help bring your numbers down.
NEWS
February 27, 2012 | By Mike DiGiovanna
Bobby Abreu, perhaps placated by assurances he would receive significant playing time this season, seemed to back off his play-me-or-trade-me demand a bit after meeting with Angels Manager Mike Scioscia and General Manager Jerry Dipoto before the team's first full-squad workout Monday . "They said they would find a way to get me about 400 at-bats as a designated hitter, left fielder and right fielder," said Abreu, who turns 38...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014 | Claire Noland
Mary Anderson, a redheaded actress who auditioned for the part of Scarlett O'Hara in the 1939 epic "Gone With the Wind" but wound up playing a supporting role as Maybelle Merriwether, died Sunday. She was 96. A longtime resident of Brentwood, Anderson died under hospice care in Burbank. She had been in declining health and had suffered a series of small strokes, said her longtime friend Betty Landess. Anderson was one of the last surviving cast members of the film adaptation of Margaret Mitchell's Civil War novel.
SPORTS
April 27, 2014 | By Lisa Dillman
He has the beard of a hockey player residing in the first round of the playoffs, not one of a man living for months in the mountains. Kings forward Jeff Carter offered a take on the attitude - and, well, altitude - of a now-compelling playoff series between the Kings and the San Jose Sharks in the Western Conference quarterfinals. "Yeah, we're halfway there. Halfway up the mountain," Carter said Sunday afternoon at the Kings' practice facility in El Segundo. Game 6 is Monday night at Staples Center with the Sharks holding a three-games-to-two series lead.
NATIONAL
April 27, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Justice Antonin Scalia, the Supreme Court's new champion of the 4th Amendment, is likely to play a crucial role Tuesday when the court hears this year's most important search case: whether the police may routinely examine the digital contents of a cellphone confiscated during an arrest. Civil libertarians say the stakes are high because arrests are so common - 13.1 million were made in 2010, according to the FBI - and smartphones hold so much private information. Under current law, officers may search a person under arrest, checking pockets and looking through a wallet or purse.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2014 | By Rebecca Keegan
In the new movie "Hateship Loveship," Kristen Wiig's character, an introverted, thirtysomething housekeeper named Johannna practices kissing herself in the mirror. It's a moment of loneliness that Wiig and director Liza Johnson envisioned as a sad beat in the film. But at a screening last September at the Toronto International Film Festival, Wiig was shocked when audiences laughed at the scene. "I'm so surprised that comes across as funny," she said in a recent interview at a Los Feliz cafe.
HOME & GARDEN
April 23, 2014 | By Carren Jao
After having grown up on the Monterey Peninsula, L.A. architect Polly Osborne couldn't help but take nature into consideration in her work. "It was all around me," Osborne says. So too were pioneers whose ideas would ripple down the history of green architecture. Will Shaw, one of the founders, with Ansel Adams, of Foundation for Environmental Design, was her stepfather. Lawrence Halprin, a revered elder of landscape architecture, and George Brook-Kothlow, architect of handmade houses, were friends of the family.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2014 | By Susan King
Valerie Harper is positively radiant these days. There's a sparkle in her eyes and a genuine warmth in her smile. Why not? She's defied the odds. Early last year, Harper was told she had three months to live. Harper, a non-smoker who had a cancerous tumor removed from her lung in 2009, has a rare form of lung cancer that had spread to areas around her brain.  "I was supposed to be dead a year ago," said Harper, 74. "We are all terminal, let's face it.  I did the shock and grief.
SPORTS
April 14, 2014 | Helene Elliott
Were those tears or drops of sweat rolling down Teemu Selanne's face Sunday as he skated around the Honda Center, absorbing and returning the crowd's love after the final regular-season game of his Hall of Fame career? If he wept, he wasn't alone. Selanne's love for Southern California was mutual from the day he joined the Ducks in February 1996, traded here by the financially strapped Winnipeg Jets. One sunny breakfast under palm trees, and he was home. "This is my kind of place," he recalled thinking.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
Brian Dennehy sat cross-legged on a stool and bent to rub his aching right knee and shin. His day of rehearsing "The Steward of Christendom" would soon be done. But the physical nicks and dings that the former Columbia University football lineman and ex-Marine copes with at age 75 weren't his main concern. He was more worried about getting his head around the part he'd handpicked for himself to play at the Mark Taper Forum, knowing full well that it's a forbidding green monster. Green because it's Irish, Dennehy's favorite flavor by birth.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2009 | Michael Ordona
Bill Nighy's journey to mid-'60s England began in, of all places, mid-'60s England. As a teen, he left home for Paris to write, came back unwritten, then became an actor, later to play a key (imaginary) figure in the very music that transformed him as a youth. But let's start with Bill the Mod. "Mods loved black American music: Stax, Atlantic and Tamla Motown," says the actor in a quiet, cultured voice at a table at L'Ermitage. "You had a half-inch all-over haircut. You wore Ravel loafers and trousers of the cigarette type but slightly too short, and I regret to say this, and I'm embarrassed and ashamed, but with . . . colored socks."
WORLD
April 11, 2014 | By Paul Richter and Ramin Mostaghim
WASHINGTON - The White House will block Iran's choice of United Nations ambassador from entering the United States, officials said Friday, stoking new tension between Tehran and Washington as they approach a critical moment in negotiations over Iran's disputed nuclear program. Facing overwhelming bipartisan pressure from Congress, White House officials said Hamid Aboutalebi would not be granted a U.S. visa. The choice of the veteran diplomat set off an outcry in Washington because of his membership in the radical student group that stormed the U.S. Embassy in Tehran and held U.S. diplomats hostage during Iran's 1979 revolution.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
It's too easy to start with the face or what she wears, how she sits. The color of her earrings. The essence is in the vowels, the way she holds and releases them. The voice drops a register, as if in a conspiracy, and a morning conversation drifts across art, ambition, age and riding camels in the desert. Many roles come to mind when Nicole Kidman speaks: inconsolable mother, suicidal writer, dangerous weather girl, nuclear scientist, gangster lover, top-hatted cabaret singer and Southern femme fatale with an earthy remedy for jellyfish stings.
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