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NEWS
February 26, 1999 | BARBARA THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mary Thompson knew she was pretty, but the compliments she received never veered below the neck. "My eyes were the topic. 'You have beautiful eyes. . . . You have a really pretty face, if you were a little bit thinner,' " recalled the size 14 investment banking assistant from El Cajon. The 32-year-old Thompson didn't fret over the pounds. She entered a model search contest instead.
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NEWS
February 26, 1999 | BARBARA THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mary Thompson knew she was pretty, but the compliments she received never veered below the neck. "My eyes were the topic. 'You have beautiful eyes. . . . You have a really pretty face, if you were a little bit thinner,' " recalled the size 14 investment banking assistant from El Cajon. The 32-year-old Thompson didn't fret over the pounds. She entered a model search contest instead.
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NEWS
July 15, 1992 | DAVE LESHER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
When Linda Moulton-Patterson stepped onto the stage during the opening night of the Democratic National Convention, a million women marched up there with her. In November, 1990, just days after she won her first election to the Huntington Beach City Council, Moulton-Patterson was found to have breast cancer. She was shocked that it came without warning. And she was scared.
NEWS
December 12, 1993 | JODI DUCKETT, THE MORNING CALL
Technically, wrestling celebrity Hulk Hogan's role in the movie "Mr. Nanny" is more that of a bodyguard than a full-fledged nanny, but seeing him cast as the reluctant guy who cares for and protects two motherless, rambunctious youngsters begs the question. So does watching Eldin, the offbeat painter turned nanny for television's career-minded "Murphy Brown." His nurturing instincts are evident as he plays pat-a-cake with Murphy's baby son, Avery.
NEWS
March 4, 1993 | DOUG McCLELLAN, Special to The Times
The scene is a Thousand Oaks classroom: "My name is Maya Angelou," the woman begins. "I was born April 4, 1928, in St. Louis, Mo. When I was 3 years old my parents got a divorce, and so my brother, Bailey, who was 4, and I were sent to live with our grandmother." The students at St. Patrick's Episcopal Day School are entranced by the bold colors and African designs of the woman's long skirt and headwrap.
NEWS
December 12, 1993 | JODI DUCKETT, THE MORNING CALL
Technically, wrestling celebrity Hulk Hogan's role in the movie "Mr. Nanny" is more that of a bodyguard than a full-fledged nanny, but seeing him cast as the reluctant guy who cares for and protects two motherless, rambunctious youngsters begs the question. So does watching Eldin, the offbeat painter turned nanny for television's career-minded "Murphy Brown." His nurturing instincts are evident as he plays pat-a-cake with Murphy's baby son, Avery.
MAGAZINE
October 28, 1990
Streep says "it's quite disturbing" that the movie industry presents whores for role models ("Pretty Women," et cetera). What she needs to begin accepting, no matter how unbelievable, is that these type of movies are what people want to see. Ever since the national awareness of gay men being cast in a negative light, the "macho men" have come back onto our screen in greater proportion along with their fantasy whores. CHERYL BEHUNIN Torrance
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1998 | LESLEY WRIGHT
The largest meeting of professional African American women in the county will meet for the 19th annual Bethune Recognition Luncheon on Saturday to honor the contributions of Lake Forest Councilwoman Kathryn McCullough. The National Council of Negro Women Inc. annually throws the gala to promote education, ethnic pride and cultural support for African American families and communities, sponsors said. Garden Grove resident Beatrice C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1988
As milestones go, this one was almost overlooked: Last week the Boy Scouts of America quietly dropped the organization's 78-year ban on women as scoutmasters and other troop leaders. The announcement, triggered by a lawsuit filed by a Goleta mother, recognized in somewhat tardy fashion the revolutionary changes that have been taking place in the American family, especially the rise in the number of households headed by women.
NEWS
June 2, 1992
Black Women of Achievement will salute four trail-blazing African-Americans at a June 11 luncheon at the Westin Bonaventure Hotel. Guests of honor at the ninth annual luncheon will be former Rep. Barbara Jordan (D-Tex.), singer-actress Diahann Carroll, Spelman College President Johnnetta Cole and Los Angeles attorney Melanie Lomax.
NEWS
March 4, 1993 | DOUG McCLELLAN, Special to The Times
The scene is a Thousand Oaks classroom: "My name is Maya Angelou," the woman begins. "I was born April 4, 1928, in St. Louis, Mo. When I was 3 years old my parents got a divorce, and so my brother, Bailey, who was 4, and I were sent to live with our grandmother." The students at St. Patrick's Episcopal Day School are entranced by the bold colors and African designs of the woman's long skirt and headwrap.
NEWS
July 15, 1992 | DAVE LESHER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
When Linda Moulton-Patterson stepped onto the stage during the opening night of the Democratic National Convention, a million women marched up there with her. In November, 1990, just days after she won her first election to the Huntington Beach City Council, Moulton-Patterson was found to have breast cancer. She was shocked that it came without warning. And she was scared.
NEWS
November 8, 1988 | JEANNINE STEIN, Times Staff Writer
For someone who claims that fear is the story of her life, Jacqueline Piatigorsky seems unintimidated by the incredibly heavy Carrara marble sculpture that needs to be moved. "Don't touch it," says the 77-year-old white-haired woman curtly as she eases her cumbersome, dusty work in progress from one platform to another. "You don't know how to handle it."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1995 | MIMI KO
A coalition of Orange County Latino and Asian community groups, students and educators is forming to urge producers of the new television comedy "House of Buggin' " to stop airing what they call offensive portrayals of ethnic minorities. "The show promotes racism and negative stereotypes," said Javier A. Cortez, a Latino rights advocate who is leading the coalition STAARS (Students, Teachers and Activists Against Racial Stereotypes).
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