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Rolene Otero

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NEWS
December 31, 1989 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seven garment workers who cooperated with a recent federal labor crackdown on Orange County sweatshops now complain that they have been blacklisted, intimidated or forced to give kickbacks to their bosses, prompting a second round of investigations by the U.S. Department of Labor.
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NEWS
December 31, 1989 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seven garment workers who cooperated with a recent federal labor crackdown on Orange County sweatshops now complain that they have been blacklisted, intimidated or forced to give kickbacks to their bosses, prompting a second round of investigations by the U.S. Department of Labor.
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NEWS
December 31, 1989 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seven garment workers who cooperated with a recent federal crackdown on Orange County sweatshops now say they have been blacklisted, intimidated or forced to give kickbacks to their bosses, prompting a second round of investigations by the U.S. Department of Labor.
NEWS
December 31, 1989 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seven garment workers who cooperated with a recent federal crackdown on Orange County sweatshops now say they have been blacklisted, intimidated or forced to give kickbacks to their bosses, prompting a second round of investigations by the U.S. Department of Labor.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1989
On the superficial level I knew the horrors of immigrants here in the U.S. However, the appalling conditions in which so many immigrant workers survive, and are so abused, cheated and demeaned were dramatically portrayed in Sonni Efron's "Mother's Plight Turns a Home Into Sweatshop" (Nov. 27). As if the conditions weren't so horrendous as to have children stripped of their education, the fact that this family has yet to see one cent of their money truly disturbs me.
BUSINESS
February 15, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. Collects Nearly $1 Million for Garment Workers: The Labor Department recovered $997,214 during the government's 1995 fiscal year in back wages for illegally underpaid workers in garment manufacturing shops in the Los Angeles-Orange County area. During the two previous years, authorities collected slightly more than $1 million for garment workers denied minimum wages or overtime pay.
BUSINESS
April 6, 1999 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Sun Valley manufacturer has agreed to pay $107,000 in back wages and $3,000 in penalties to settle a federal complaint that the company submitted misleading information in order to hire three foreign workers and then underpaid them. Rolene Otero, director of the Labor Department's Wage and Hour Division district office in Glendale, said the fines should serve as a warning.
NEWS
November 26, 1989 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever since Jewish immigrants poured into garment shops on New York's Lower East Side at the turn of the century, the "rag trade" has provided entry-level jobs for refugees. Sewing remains equally attractive to new capitalists. It takes only about $20,000 to $30,000 to rent a shop and sewing machines and launch a garment-contracting business. Orange County has at least 400 such shops, the majority owned by Vietnamese refugees who have immigrated within the last five years.
BUSINESS
June 11, 1993 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than one-quarter of the manufacturers in Southern California's apparel industry--including some of the area's biggest names in fashion--have been told by the federal government to stop doing business with contractors violating labor laws, newly released documents show. U.S. Labor Department officials issued the directives to 157 Southland apparel manufacturers in a program launched in 1991 to attack minimum wage, overtime pay and child labor law violations in the abuse-ridden industry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1989 | JEANNE WRIGHT
When Rolene Otero, enforcement director for the U.S. Department of Labor, began a massive crackdown on garment industry sweatshops in Orange County this year, she knew it would be risky. Helping women and children who sew for wages as low as $1.45 an hour has not always been a high priority at the home office in Washington, she said. But, Otero said: "You've got to do what you have to do and let the chips fall.
BUSINESS
May 21, 1996 | STUART SILVERSTEIN and GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a new salvo against labor law abuses in the apparel-manufacturing industry, the Labor Department rebuked several major retailers Monday, including J.C. Penney Co. and Macy's, that have been selling merchandise produced at three alleged sweatshops. One of the three is a south Los Angeles knitwear firm--known alternately as Chums Casual, Chums Knitwear and Stephen K. Corp.--cited by the Labor Department on charges of violating minimum wage and overtime pay laws.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1990 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A tearful Santa Ana garment worker Friday joined union organizers, religious leaders and Assemblyman Tom Hayden in launching a campaign to crack down on sweatshops. "I am here because I want justice," said Juana Valladares, whose 7- and 10-year-old children helped her sew clothes at home for pay that averaged $1.45 an hour. Valladares, who said she still earns less than the minimum $4.
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