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Rolf Wallenstrom

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NEWS
January 12, 1989 | From United Press International
Rolf Wallenstrom, director of the Pacific Region of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service who raised concerns about offshore oil drilling in California and agricultural pollution at western wildlife refuges, has been fired. Calling himself the target of agency politics, Wallenstrom, 56, confirmed Tuesday that he has been fired effective Friday. He said he is considering an appeal to the federal Merit System Review Board or a lawsuit.
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NEWS
January 12, 1989 | From United Press International
Rolf Wallenstrom, director of the Pacific Region of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service who raised concerns about offshore oil drilling in California and agricultural pollution at western wildlife refuges, has been fired. Calling himself the target of agency politics, Wallenstrom, 56, confirmed Tuesday that he has been fired effective Friday. He said he is considering an appeal to the federal Merit System Review Board or a lawsuit.
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NEWS
December 20, 1987 | Associated Press
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has denied federal protection for the northern spotted owl as a threatened or endangered species. The owl, which weighs less than two pounds, has been embraced by environmentalists as a symbol of the decline of the Pacific Northwest's old-growth forests. Environmentalists say the owl is endangered by its apparent inability to adapt to second-growth forests.
NEWS
July 6, 1988
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Director Frank Dunkle has relieved Pacific regional director Rolf L. Wallenstrom of his duties for at least 30 days in what agency sources say is political punishment. Wallenstrom has been assigned to a new 30-day post in which he will help formulate a plan to address agricultural irrigation drainage water contamination. Fish and Wildlife spokesman Sam Marler denied any political motivation for the move. Agency sources said Wallenstrom, based in Portland, Ore.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1987 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
A federal wildlife inspector was indicted Wednesday, along with three Los Angeles-area residents, on charges that they illegally imported more than 50,000 exotic reptiles listed under international treaty as protected species. Daniel Gus Noether, 38, of Lakewood, is accused of accepting $40,000 in bribes from three Southern California wildlife dealers in what officials said is the first corruption case ever brought against a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service inspector.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1986 | DAVID SMOLLAR, Times Staff Writer
At least one of the three California condors remaining in the wild could be trapped within one week because of a court decision lifting an injunction against their capture, an official of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said Wednesday. But capture of the two other birds probably will await recommendations later this summer from organizations involved in trying to save the endangered species, said Rolf Wallenstrom, western regional director for the wildlife service.
SPORTS
May 8, 1987
The battle between environmentalists and commercial fishermen over the use of gill nets in waters along the California coast apparently will rage for at least another year. An attempt by the Committee to Ban Gill Nets to put a constitutional initiative on the ballot this year failed when it got an insufficient number of signatures to qualify for the ballot, but another attempt is under way for 1988.
NEWS
June 12, 1986 | DAVID SMOLLAR, Times Staff Writer
At least one of three California condors remaining in the wild could be trapped within a week because of a court decision lifting an injunction against their capture, an official of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said Wednesday. But capture of the two other birds will probably await recommendations later this summer from organizations involved in trying to save the endangered condors, said Rolf Wallenstrom, Western regional director for the wildlife service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1989
Even if the federal government had not decided to list the northern spotted owl as a threatened species, the timber industry would have to stop cutting the Northwest's publicly owned ancient forests within about a decade because all the old-growth trees will be gone. So said Rolf L. Wallenstrom, former regional administrator of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Portland, Ore. "The owl has become a scapegoat," Wallenstrom added. As it is, though, the Fish and Wildlife Service finally did the proper thing last week by giving the 14-inch, dapple-brown owl official protection under the Endangered Species Act. The service needed two tries to get it right.
NEWS
August 19, 1987 | RONALD B. TAYLOR, Times Staff Writer
The California Fish and Game Commission cleared the way Tuesday for federal authorities to begin capturing sea otters along the coast and relocating them to San Nicolas Island, 55 miles southwest of Santa Catalina Island. The panel's 3-2 vote came despite vigorous protests registered over the last several months by commercial shell fishermen. It was the final authorization needed by the U.S.
NEWS
July 8, 1987 | LARRY B. STAMMER, Times Staff Writer
The California Coastal Commission on Tuesday approved a controversial plan to establish on San Nicholas Island a new colony for the threatened California sea otter. The 7-5 vote came over the objections of abalone fishermen, who said the otters' voracious appetite would reduce their catch, but it was supported by environmentalists. The commission's approval represented one of the last hurdles before the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service hopes to put its plan into effect in August.
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