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Rolin Jones

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May 4, 2003 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
Rolin Jones lives in a $400-a-month apartment above a noisy pub in New Haven, Conn. An unpleasant odor of baked potato often rises to his room, and many a night his floorboards throb with the bass line of Warren Zevon's pounding rock song "Lawyers, Guns and Money." But in his nascent career as a playwright, Jones has just landed in the penthouse, via the express elevator.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2003 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
Rolin Jones lives in a $400-a-month apartment above a noisy pub in New Haven, Conn. An unpleasant odor of baked potato often rises to his room, and many a night his floorboards throb with the bass line of Warren Zevon's pounding rock song "Lawyers, Guns and Money." But in his nascent career as a playwright, Jones has just landed in the penthouse, via the express elevator.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2003 | Mike Boehm
Readings of works in progress by Pulitzer Prize winner Donald Margulies ("Dinner With Friends") and Pulitzer finalists Amy Freed ("Freedomland") and Howard Korder ("Boy's Life") will highlight the sixth annual Pacific Playwrights Festival, May 16-18, at South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2003 | Mike Boehm
Rolin Jones, an unknown, L.A.-raised playwright who is still in graduate school, will get a prominent showcase as South Coast Repertory stages the world premiere of his "The Intelligent Design of Jenny Chow," May 2-18 on its Julianne Argyros Stage. The play concerns Jennifer Marcus, a 22-year-old genius who lives as a shut-in because of a psychological disorder. She reaches out to the world via the Internet, forging an alter-ego for herself as she searches for her Chinese birth mother.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2010 | By Yvonne Villarreal, Los Angeles Times
Sometimes a touchdown comes when the clock is winding down. After its fourth — and possibly final season — "Friday Night Lights" finally scored big on Emmy day. The series set against high school football scored four nominations Thursday, including major ones for Connie Britton and Kyle Chandler, who star as Dillon, Texas' all-star couple, for lead actress and lead actor in a drama. "This is not something we had been thinking about this year," Britton said. "I think it's more flattering because we were so used to not being nominated [in the major categories]
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2003 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
Jennifer Marcus sits alone in her Calabasas bedroom, typing and clicking. A 22-year-old wizard in cyberspace, she hardly ever goes anywhere else. Already an obsessive-compulsive, she has also become an agoraphobic. The image of a computerized recluse is a strikingly modern emblem, but can Jennifer carry a play? In theater, people interact with each other in a shared, tangible space. People like Jennifer would never venture into one.
NATIONAL
April 18, 2006 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
Geraldine Brooks' novel "March" won the 2006 Pulitzer Prize for fiction Monday, and the prize for biography went to "American Prometheus: The Triumph and Tragedy of J. Robert Oppenheimer" by historians Kai Bird and Martin J. Sherwin. These and other prize winners in Letters and Music, along with awards for news coverage, were announced by Columbia University. Brooks' second novel, published by Viking, tells the story of Mr.
NEWS
May 27, 2004 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
Bigger isn't always better. But there is something exciting -- at least in the anticipation stage -- about tackling a two-part epic or a whole weekend of theater at one location, as Los Angeles theatergoers discovered during such landmark productions as "Nicholas Nickleby," "The Mahabharata," "The Kentucky Cycle" and "Angels in America." This summer, San Diego is the place to go for that kind of super-size experience.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2006 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
As journalists, novelists, photographers and poets toasted their winners of the 2006 Pulitzer Prizes, playwrights were left with empty champagne glasses Monday when it was announced that the Pulitzer board had selected no recipient in the drama category for the first time since 1997.
NEWS
May 1, 2003
MOVIES Better the second time Twenty-five years after putting down a book that was enthusiastically reviewed by the New York Times but that he couldn't get into, Mark Moskowitz tried to read it again and loved it. His search to track down copies of "The Stones of Summer," by then out of print, and its author, Dow Mossman, have resulted in "Stone Reader," a documentary unraveling a literary mystery. "Stone Reader," unrated, opens Friday exclusively at the Landmark Nuart, 11272 Santa Monica Blvd.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2010 | Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
In the quiet moments, before all the post-Emmy magazine covers and self-congratulatory campaign literature starts piling up, it's important to remember that the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences is an institution. And like all institutions, it likes to send the world messages. Some of these have become fairly standard ("we love Tony Shalhoub!" "There will never be a competive reality show better than ' The Amazing Race'!") and some are more of the moment ("we can't pare this list down to five so we're going to make it six and if that also broadens the Emmy broadcast audience, that's cool too."
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