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NEWS
May 10, 1989 | From Times wire services
Fifty-eight California insurance companies, including some major firms, have asked for exemptions from a 20% rate rollback under Proposition 103, the state Department of Insurance said today. The rollback, to rates 20% below November, 1987, levels, was upheld by the state Supreme Court last Thursday. But the court said insurers could get exemptions as needed for a "fair return" on their investment, a standard to be determined by Insurance Commissioner Roxani M. Gillespie. The ruling also allows insurance companies to put their rates into effect once they have filed with the department for an exemption.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
On the eve of contract negotiations with the studios, the Writers Guild of America said employers are seeking big cuts in healthcare benefits and pay. The guild said opening proposals from the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers contained $60 million in "rollbacks for writers," including cuts in the union's health and pension plans, as well as reductions in pay rates for screenplays and TV residuals. "Are you surprised? We were," Chip Johannessen and Billy Ray, co-chairs of the union's negotiating committee, wrote in a letter to members.
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NEWS
May 13, 1989 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
President Bush's speech Friday outlining how his Administration will approach policy toward the Soviet Union recalls U.S. efforts to deal with its primary adversary during the early years of the Cold War. Forty years ago, the United States adopted a policy of "containment" toward an expansionist Soviet Union. In the early 1950s, the Dwight D. Eisenhower Administration went further, calling for a "rollback" of communism that would force the Kremlin to release the East European nations it had subjugated after World War II. The policy of "rollback" died in 1956 when the United States did not help Hungarians who rebelled against Moscow.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2013 | By David Zahniser
A Los Angeles employee relations officer delivered a stinging defeat to the city's labor leaders Thursday, saying that they failed to meet a procedural deadline for challenging a hotly contested rollback in public employee pension benefits. Hearing Officer Luella Nelson recommended that the Employee Relations Board, a five-member panel that decides labor disputes at City Hall, dismiss a challenge to the City Council's decision to cut pension pay for employees hired after July 1. Council members voted to scale back pension benefits and increase the retirement age in October 2012.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1989 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
KABC-TV Channel 7 was first on the air with the Califronia State Supreme Court's verdict on Proposition 103 Thursday, but the station's hurried and unscheduled initial report got it wrong. KABC interrupted its morning talk show, "A.M. Los Angeles," and mistakenly reported that the Supreme Court had "struck down as unconstitutional" the 20% rollback called for by the initiative that was approved by voters last November. After KNBC Channel 4 and KCBS-TV Channel 2 broke into their own regular programs a few minutes later and reported that the Supreme Court had in fact upheld the rollback, KABC reporter Mark Coogan again interrupted the station's usual programming to correct the error--about 20 minutes after his first report.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1988
Re your July 31 editorial on Proposition 13: Your article was well taken except, in my opinion, it should have also focused on the larger tax benefits accruing to the owners of business and commercial property. As I recall, this segment of the taxpaying community received from Proposition 13 a greater rollback of assessments, and it experiences a much slower turnover rate. Your readers ought to be reminded of this situation as well. ALAN P. FRASER Placentia
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1990
The Times' editors have obviously fallen for the Bush Administration's bait and switch routine regarding the rollback of Social Security payroll taxes. The Social Security surplus is being used to operate the government, and as such amounts to deficit spending. Some of these surplus funds coincidentally go to current recipients, but most of the money is intended for the "general purposes of government," as Moynihan said. Depriving the budget-makers of these funds does not threaten those currently receiving Social Security benefits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1988
The day after Proposition 103 passed, I received my insurance bill with a 20% increase, and I've had no tickets or accidents. Included with my bill was a pre-printed letter that explained: "The exchange issues or renews more than 52,000 policies every month and has not yet been able to calculate and apply the rates required by Proposition 103. Moreover, the exchange would be threatened with insolvency if it were forced to provide the reductions required...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1995
How many readers remember that sales tax rates were increased in the past to provide funds for an emergency, the most recent increase being a quarter-cent to provide funds for San Francisco earthquake relief? We were promised in each case that the rates would be rolled back after the need was met. The rollbacks were never initiated. Gov. Pete Wilson now proposes to lower taxes--income taxes, that is (Jan. 10). The most simple and honorable way to reduce taxes would be to review the history of sales tax increases and reduce them by a combined rollback.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1988
As a "working writer," I think the most frustrating aspect of the current writers' strike is that we aren't striking for substantial gains in our contract, but rather to hold on to what we already have. Unfortunately, Michael Cieply's June 30 article and, indeed, most of the press coverage the strike has received thus far, has failed to acknowledge the climate in which the writers' strike is taking place. That is, like virtually every other strike that has occurred in America since the infamous air controllers' strike of 1980, this one is a by-product of the "rollback mentality" that has become so popular during the Reagan Enchantment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2013 | Sandy Banks
Jasmyne Cannick didn't join the folks in West Hollywood celebrating the gay marriage victory handed down by the Supreme Court this week. She was too busy mourning the assault on minorities' voting rights the court unleashed the day before. Cannick is a lesbian. She's also black. "And I didn't feel like dancing for joy," she said. She's not alone in feeling conflicted. For many people, including me, the high court's flurry of recent rulings feels like one big step forward on civil rights, and a whole lot of shuffling back.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2013 | By David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles mayoral candidate Wendy Greuel is pushing to reopen talks with the city's employee unions over a recent decision to reduce public employee pension benefits, sparking alarm from some at City Hall. Looking to differentiate herself from City Councilman Eric Garcetti on labor issues, the city controller has asserted for months that Los Angeles leaders failed to properly negotiate with its unions before hiking the retirement age and rolling back pension benefits for newly hired civilian city workers.
SPORTS
August 18, 2012 | By Helene Elliott
Donald Fehr, executive director of the NHL Players' Assn., said Friday the union remains opposed to the league's proposal that players make significant financial givebacks to promote economic stability among wealthy and have-not franchises in the next collective bargaining agreement and said he can't answer the obvious question of whether a lockout will occur. "I wish I knew the answer to that too. I've got about 750 guys out there that would like to know the answer to that," he said during a conference call after the second of four meetings with players.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2012 | By Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times
Gilbert Robles retired as a state parole agent at age 53, able to collect a $101,195 annual pension — 94% of his final salary. Last year, six months after he retired, the Arcadia resident accepted a political appointment with the same agency that pays an additional six figures. Scott Hallabrin took retirement as the top attorney for the state's ethics agency on June 29, 2009. The next day, he went back to the same post, as he prepared to watch his pension checks roll in on top of a salary.
NATIONAL
October 17, 2011 | By Noam N. Levey, Washington Bureau
Republican activists, increasingly optimistic they can win the White House and Senate next year, are beginning to lay the groundwork for a multi-pronged campaign in 2013 to roll back President Obama's sweeping healthcare overhaul. The push includes an effort to pressure Republican candidates to commit to using every available tool to fully repeal the law, a tactic pioneered by conservative activist Grover Norquist, who made an anti-tax pledge de rigeur for GOP politicians. Other conservative healthcare experts are developing an alternative to the law, an effort that could protect Republicans from past critiques that their healthcare plans left tens of millions of Americans without medical coverage.
NATIONAL
February 16, 2011 | By Lisa Mascaro, Los Angeles Times
Despite the political and economic risks, congressional Republicans are forging ahead with proposals for severe budget cuts this year, even though party leaders acknowledged the reductions could lead to job losses in the name of deficit reduction. Criticism mounted at the start of a House debate as Democrats took aim at GOP plans to maintain tax breaks for oil companies and the wealthy while cutting medical research, community policing and funding for "Sesame Street," calling the proposal a "mindless" exercise that would do little to address the nation's $1.5-trillion deficit.
BUSINESS
May 9, 1989
Amwest Insurance Group, a Woodland Hills insurance concern, filed an application with the California insurance commissioner to maintain its premiums at rates higher than those called for by Proposition 103. The proposition was passed by voters Nov. 8, and the state Supreme Court last week upheld most of its features, including its rollback of premium rates to levels 20% below those in effect Nov. 8, 1987. The proposition covers various kinds of property and casualty insurance. But the court allowed insurers to apply for higher rates if they can show that the rate cut would prevent them from earning a "fair and reasonable" return.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1997
Insurance Commissioner Chuck Quackenbush is socking it to consumers again, this time by his willingness to let a company that mismanaged its earthquake exposure and then withdrew from the homeowners and earthquake insurance market after the 1994 Northridge earthquake to come back in ("20th Century Will Resume Quake Coverage," Dec. 25). 20th Century Insurance Co., a notorious cherry-picker, had over-concentrated its risk in the San Fernando Valley, violating the fundamental tenet of insurance--spreading the risk--and its policyholders paid the price.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2010 | Maeve Reston, Los Angeles Times
Democratic Sen. Barbara Boxer said Friday that rival Carly Fiorina's recent embrace of a November ballot measure that would roll back the state's landmark global warming law was evidence that the Republican was "in the pocket of big oil" and "dirty coal. " With California's unemployment rate at 12.3%, the three-term senator and Democratic gubernatorial candidate Jerry Brown have argued that the state's 2006 global warming law, which would cut greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels over the next decade, will play a crucial role in creating jobs and stimulating the green energy sector in California.
BUSINESS
July 29, 2010 | By Duke Helfand, Los Angeles Times
Despite falling revenue and enrollments, insurance giant WellPoint Inc. on Wednesday reported a 4% increase in profit for the second quarter. The Indianapolis company, the nation's largest health insurer by membership, earned $722.4 million, or $1.71 a share, in the three-month period ended June 30, compared with $693.5 million, or $1.43, for the same period the previous year. For the first half of the year, earnings were up 26% over 2009. WellPoint runs Blue Cross Blue Shield plans in 14 states and is the parent of Anthem Blue Cross of California, the state's largest for-profit health insurer.
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